Available in many states and most of Canada, a goody box of coupons and samples is available for those that attend a free baby class that covers pregnancy, baby care and health and safety issues. Taking this class could be in addition to or in place of hospital maternity classes (which also hand out a bag of goodies once you complete it). But even just signing up puts you on a list for promotions.
I’m seconding the concern about starches as body powders. As a nurse, I know that starches do feed yeasts that can thrive on moist skin: along any sweaty crease like the groin, under breasts, under yer butt cheeks, etc. Hospitals once used talc, then starch-based powders, now mostly neither. I’m not being a nay-sayer. Just offering a word of caution. If ya get yeasty, maybe don’t put starch there. Can’t speak to powder combos with baking soda or whatever though.
Did you know that when you sign up for a free magazine it puts your name on a list that says that you probably have young children? And you know who would like to send you promotional items (and maybe coupons) because you have small children? Diaper companies! Diaper companies buy marketing lists so that they can send you advertisements to win you over. Plus, lots of times the FREE Magazine Subscriptions I receive come with bonus coupons inside! Randomly I will see Huggies, Pampers or Luvs coupons.
Johnson & Johnson said in a statement that the company will appeal this latest verdict, and cites a National Cancer Institute report from April that found the weight of evidence “does not support an association between perineal talc exposure and an increased risk of ovarian cancer.” (However, the New York Times reports, the report takes a different tone in another section, noting that “it is not clear” whether talc is a risk factor for cancer.)
Prosecutors say Johnson & Johnson knew about the risk since the early 1980s and did not protect its customers. In fact, the first study conducted on talc powder use on female genitalia found a 92 percent increased risk for ovarian cancer with women who reported genital talc use. But still, other doctors disagree. "Several decades of medical research do not support the hypothesis that use of talcum powder causes ovarian cancer," said Dr. Hal Lawrence, chief executive officer of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
Dried Herbs – Dried herbs are also a fabulous addition, and may be a better option for very young babies. They can be ground into a powder in a coffee/spice grinder, and can be used in lieu of, or in addition to, essential oils. Some herbs are great for deodorizing, while others are nice for their skin-soothing benefits. Note: Be sure to thoroughly sift your dried herbs after grinding to catch any pieces that were not finely ground into a powder or it could be rough and irritating to baby’s skin.
Sometimes, a written letter or email telling a diaper company about your baby’s birth (especially if you have multiples) asking for a product to sample can result in some free diapers. I wouldn’t really recommend going the “sob story” route too strong, but companies want to know you, their customer. If you ever have faulty diapers, be sure to contact them as most have a guarantee and will replace your defective diapers for free.
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There has long been controversy on whether or not you should use baby powder on your babe's behind. The American Academy of Pediatrics have warned that the teeny tiny particles can get trapped in an infant's small lungs and parents should be very careful with its use. Just last week, a lawsuit discovered that talc is linked to cancer. Pretty scary stuff! The court awarded $72 million to the plaintiff in the lawsuit, making this the first case in history against Johnson & Johnson baby powder. Considering that talc is banned in the European Union and has limited commercial use in Canada (especially in baby ware), it gives one pause in using the product.
I’m seconding the concern about starches as body powders. As a nurse, I know that starches do feed yeasts that can thrive on moist skin: along any sweaty crease like the groin, under breasts, under yer butt cheeks, etc. Hospitals once used talc, then starch-based powders, now mostly neither. I’m not being a nay-sayer. Just offering a word of caution. If ya get yeasty, maybe don’t put starch there. Can’t speak to powder combos with baking soda or whatever though.
Simply put your clay into a ceramic or glass mixing bowl, disperse the essential oil over the surface of the powder and mix with a spoon until thoroughly incorporated. Once mixed you can put into a powder shaker and you're ready to go! You can easily make your own container by drilling holes into the lid of a vitamin bottle, or repurpose an empty spice jar. 

One of my first projects when our baby was small was a natural homemade baby powder. His tiny little delicate rolls were difficult to keep dry with so many diaper changes during the day. I had so much fun concocting the perfect gentle, soothing baby powder that could be used on him, and it smelled so wonderful I ended up adding it to my own post-shower routine!
To help support new and expecting moms, Target is giving away a free Welcome Kit when you set up a baby registry.  The kit includes $50+ worth of coupons and free diapers. After creating your registry, visit the Target service desk to pick up your free Welcome Kit. Items may vary by stores, but may include: Munchkin bottle, Lansinoh samples, MAM Newborn pacifier, Honest Wipes, and Diapers sample pack, Baby Bag and much more!
Destiny Diaper Bank covers the entire southwest Florida area. The non-profit almost 700,000 diapers a year to the low income and needy. They may also provide free samples or coupons to buy them. They have five sites throughout southwest Florida that they distribute diapers from, and also partner with local social service agencies. The group is run by volunteers. Cape Coral, Florida. Call (239)-549-2130.
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