But Johnson & Johnson insists a correlation between talc powder and ovarian cancer has not been proven. In a lawsuit settled in March 2017, the jury ruled in favor of Johnson & Johnson, Reuters reports. The plaintiff was Tennessee resident Nora Daniels, who alleged that she used their baby powder for 36 years and was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2013.
Relating to our last point, we encourage you to use that secondary email address to sign up for all the offers you can. Sometimes you’ll stumble upon fake offers on the internet, and you don’t want those anywhere near your main email address or your personal information. Here at SampleBuddy.com we do an awesome job filtering out fake offers, only posting the legitimate deals that will result in a free product at your door.
Available in many states and most of Canada, a goody box of coupons and samples is available for those that attend a free baby class that covers pregnancy, baby care and health and safety issues. Taking this class could be in addition to or in place of hospital maternity classes (which also hand out a bag of goodies once you complete it). But even just signing up puts you on a list for promotions.
made me think that it might not be a bad idea to look into alternatives. As for cornstarch, it's a great talc replacement as long as your baby doesn't develop a yeast diaper rash (apparently relatively common) in which case you're actually feeding the yeast with the corn starch. Also, the majority of corn starch used in baby powders are going to be from corn that was conventionally grown with pesticide use and is genetically modified.   
Just as we mentioned above with regards to magazines, baby product companies are often very eager to give out free samples. They know that new parents have to be very choosy and they want to get some positive word-of-mouth, so they’re often more than happy to send out free products in the mail. Try registering on company websites or simply contacting them about samples; you’ll strike gold in no time.
But honestly, cloth diapers, as I mentioned earlier, have the most robust free diaper programs and they're the easiest to access. Groups like Giving Diapers, Giving Hope and The Rebecca Foundation's Cloth Diaper Closet offer free cloth diapers to those in need. Alternatively, you can get free or very cheap cloth diapers from online forums like Diaper Swappers that specialize in recycled (highly laundered) cloth diapers. Change-Diapers.com is a great resource with a link every Friday for cloth diaper giveaways they've found online, too.
**Please note: Some people are opposed to using essential oils when caring for children and babies. I've found that most popular natural baby skincare lines use them safely and successfully for their healing and sensory qualities and have chosen to do so as well. This is something for you to research yourself and decide what is best for you and your baby.

Lab studies: In studies done in the lab, animals are exposed to a substance (often in very large doses) to see if it causes tumors or other health problems. Researchers might also expose normal cells in a lab dish to the substance to see if it causes the types of changes that are seen in cancer cells. It’s not always clear if the results from these types of studies will apply to humans, but lab studies are a good way to find out if a substance might possibly cause cancer.
If you can’t afford diapers right now, then I want to mention that there are loads of places that give out FREE Diapers to those in need. They are called “Diaper Banks” and they are on a mission to make up for the diaper “gap” in order for every baby to have clean diapers. If you have extra diapers, BabyCycle in St. Pete and HereWeGrow in Dunedin are both in desperate need of your diapers.
A diaper bank known as Happy Bottoms serves people in the Kansas City area. The organization is a partnership of Cornerstones of Care and Healthy Families of Kansas City. The goal is to coordinate free diaper drives that will then go ahead and support local agencies serving low income families in the community. They also offer information on WIC and government benefits. Provides free diapers to Kansas City area agencies and social service groups.

Things of My Very Own, Inc.-Crisis Intervention Center, 202 Front Street, Schenectady New York 12305, 518-630-5146. The capital region and down state are covered. So if you live in Albany or New York City you can call for information on diaper assistance programs. Thousands of working poor families with young babies get the free diapers they need from this NYC non-profit.
I was recently turned on to dry shampoo as a way to keep my hair from looking oily between shower shampoos. My hair tends to be oily and is dark brown. All of these dry shampoos are great, not only because they are talc free dry shampoos made in the USA, but also because they leave your hair smelling and looking great. There's no grayish hair look from these powders.
Did you know that the average baby goes through 10 to 14 diapers each day? Add this cost up week over week and you realize that you’re spending a small fortune on diapers, often $60 or up each month. For this exact reason, we are always on the look out for great diaper deals and free samples. We aim to bring you diaper products as often as possible, whenever we can. We get diapers for babies of all sizes, from a range of numerous great diaper brands. We’re your eyes and ears out there on the vast web, ready to reel in any and all deals that new parents will find not only useful, but a practical lifesaver. So please feel free to browse our list today and beyond!
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