Talcum powder has been making headlines lately, but it's not a new ingredient. It's been used for centuries and can be found in a slew of consumer products, from dry shampoo and blush to baby powder. But what is talc, exactly? It's a mineral that is made up of silicon, oxygen, and magnesium and is meant to absorb moisture (therefore preventing rashes). In its natural state, talc can contain asbestos, which is a known carcinogen — but according to the American Cancer Society, commercial products containing talc have been asbestos-free since the 1970s.


Perhaps an even more serious danger, the tiny particles of talcum powder have been linked with an increased risk in cancer, particularly ovarian cancer, for women that have used it for feminine hygiene. The size of the particles means that it can easily enter the body and travel through the reproductive system to the ovaries, causing them to become irritated and inflamed. In early 2016 baby powder producer Johnson & Johnson were ordered to pay $51 million to the family of a woman who died of ovarian cancer, believed to have been caused by the company’s talcum powder.
Moody Sisters Dry Shampoo is one I love, and the brand that turned me onto using dry shampoo. It’s perfect for the times when your hair doesn’t quite need to be washed again, but could look a little less greasy. The puff applicator makes it so easy to apply and blend into your scalp without any mess. It’s handmade with organic arrowroot powder, non GMO cornstarch, lemon peel powder, organic witch hazel, and aluminum free baking soda. It’s also vegan and cruelty-free.

This one requires a little more strategy. Sign up at The Honest Company for a free trial or two. (We recommend the latter to make the most of the $5.95 shipping cost.) You can opt into a diapers and wipes bundle as well as an essentials package, which contains lotions, surface cleaners and hand soap. Just make sure to cancel your membership within seven days, or else you’ll be charged for a monthly subscription.
Destiny Diaper Bank covers the entire southwest Florida area. The non-profit almost 700,000 diapers a year to the low income and needy. They may also provide free samples or coupons to buy them. They have five sites throughout southwest Florida that they distribute diapers from, and also partner with local social service agencies. The group is run by volunteers. Cape Coral, Florida. Call (239)-549-2130.
Children's Council provides free diaper supply monthly to families utilizing CalWORKs in San Francisco. If you have an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card, you can bring your card to one of 15 locations and you'll receive six packs of diapers each month per child under the age of three. Also, try Googling "Diaper Bank" plus your city name - there are many programs around the country and they usually use the phrase diaper bank to describe their offering.
Do you have a favorite brand that also makes diapers? I really like the dish soap from Seventh Generation, and they also have baby diapers. Sign up for their “Generation Good” club and you might get selected to receive product samples! Start noticing the companies you use that also make diapers, and reach out to them to see if you can try a sample from them!
Just as we mentioned above with regards to magazines, baby product companies are often very eager to give out free samples. They know that new parents have to be very choosy and they want to get some positive word-of-mouth, so they’re often more than happy to send out free products in the mail. Try registering on company websites or simply contacting them about samples; you’ll strike gold in no time.

This isn't the first time the company has been involved in a lawsuit over its popular powder—and it will likely face hundreds more cases in the future, according to Reuters. In May, a Missouri jury awarded $110 million to a Virginia woman who alleged that her cancer was caused by baby powder, and last October, a Missouri woman was awarded more than $70 million.


Talcum powder is made from talc, a mineral made up mainly of the elements magnesium, silicon, and oxygen. As a powder, it absorbs moisture well and helps cut down on friction, making it useful for keeping skin dry and helping to prevent rashes. It is widely used in cosmetic products such as baby powder and adult body and facial powders, as well as in a number of other consumer products.

But Johnson & Johnson insists a correlation between talc powder and ovarian cancer has not been proven. In a lawsuit settled in March 2017, the jury ruled in favor of Johnson & Johnson, Reuters reports. The plaintiff was Tennessee resident Nora Daniels, who alleged that she used their baby powder for 36 years and was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2013.


Erica, I was very happy to see that you noted that the science on a talc/ ovarian cancer risk is inconclusive at best. It might be nice to move it closer to the start of this article. It’s important, because “evidence based science” is increasingly getting kicked to the curb and that’s a bad thing (don’t vaccinate your kids because one disproved study said they were linked and now people have died from measles). That said, J &J started making cornstarch baby powder years ago, it’s what we use.

Johnson & Johnson said in a statement that the company will appeal this latest verdict, and cites a National Cancer Institute report from April that found the weight of evidence “does not support an association between perineal talc exposure and an increased risk of ovarian cancer.” (However, the New York Times reports, the report takes a different tone in another section, noting that “it is not clear” whether talc is a risk factor for cancer.)
When I was expecting my first child, someone gave me a huge supply of diapers at my baby shower. I thought it was nice, but it also wasn't the giant stuffed giraffe I thought I "needed" for the nursery. Diapers were... practical. Fast-forward to now, when I have not one, but two kids, in diapers and I want to go back and kiss the feet of that mama who had the foresight to get me diapers. Diapers are expensive AF. So for everyone wondering how to get free diapers, here are some helpful pointers.
If you buy Huggies or Pampers diapers, both of them offer rewards for entering codes found on packages, or special promo codes you find online. You can also earn points for doing other things like watching their videos, leaving reviews, or reading their articles. Your points can add up over time and equal coupons for free diapers (or other rewards). Signup for Pampers Rewards HERE and/or the Huggies Rewards HERE.
Perhaps an even more serious danger, the tiny particles of talcum powder have been linked with an increased risk in cancer, particularly ovarian cancer, for women that have used it for feminine hygiene. The size of the particles means that it can easily enter the body and travel through the reproductive system to the ovaries, causing them to become irritated and inflamed. In early 2016 baby powder producer Johnson & Johnson were ordered to pay $51 million to the family of a woman who died of ovarian cancer, believed to have been caused by the company’s talcum powder.
A diaper bank known as Happy Bottoms serves people in the Kansas City area. The organization is a partnership of Cornerstones of Care and Healthy Families of Kansas City. The goal is to coordinate free diaper drives that will then go ahead and support local agencies serving low income families in the community. They also offer information on WIC and government benefits. Provides free diapers to Kansas City area agencies and social service groups.
×