If you can’t afford diapers right now, then I want to mention that there are loads of places that give out FREE Diapers to those in need. They are called “Diaper Banks” and they are on a mission to make up for the diaper “gap” in order for every baby to have clean diapers. If you have extra diapers, BabyCycle in St. Pete and HereWeGrow in Dunedin are both in desperate need of your diapers.
Nature's Baby Organics Silky Dusting Powder is safe and gentle enough for all infants, even newborns. It is made out of nothing but USDA certified organic ingredients, including tapioca starch, and organic extracts, including matricaria flower extract, echinacea angustifolia extract, and goldenseal extract to further soothe and calm irritated skin. Simply dust it over baby’s bottom to absorb wetness and relieve chaffing.

Lab studies: In studies done in the lab, animals are exposed to a substance (often in very large doses) to see if it causes tumors or other health problems. Researchers might also expose normal cells in a lab dish to the substance to see if it causes the types of changes that are seen in cancer cells. It’s not always clear if the results from these types of studies will apply to humans, but lab studies are a good way to find out if a substance might possibly cause cancer.


There has long been controversy on whether or not you should use baby powder on your babe's behind. The American Academy of Pediatrics have warned that the teeny tiny particles can get trapped in an infant's small lungs and parents should be very careful with its use. Just last week, a lawsuit discovered that talc is linked to cancer. Pretty scary stuff! The court awarded $72 million to the plaintiff in the lawsuit, making this the first case in history against Johnson & Johnson baby powder. Considering that talc is banned in the European Union and has limited commercial use in Canada (especially in baby ware), it gives one pause in using the product.
Erica, I was very happy to see that you noted that the science on a talc/ ovarian cancer risk is inconclusive at best. It might be nice to move it closer to the start of this article. It’s important, because “evidence based science” is increasingly getting kicked to the curb and that’s a bad thing (don’t vaccinate your kids because one disproved study said they were linked and now people have died from measles). That said, J &J started making cornstarch baby powder years ago, it’s what we use.
She’s talking about the sling, pillow, leggings, etc post. They charge like $15 shipping… which is basically the price of one of those items on amazon. I did find out that if you leave the site after seeing that the shipping is ridiculous, they’ll text you saying they’ll drop it a few dollars… I finally went ahead and got the nursing pillow because they’re pretty expensive everywhere else, it was still a decent deal…. however, some of the other stuff, not so much.
Children's Council provides free diaper supply monthly to families utilizing CalWORKs in San Francisco. If you have an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card, you can bring your card to one of 15 locations and you'll receive six packs of diapers each month per child under the age of three. Also, try Googling "Diaper Bank" plus your city name - there are many programs around the country and they usually use the phrase diaper bank to describe their offering.

In laboratory studies, exposure of rats, mice, and hamsters to asbestos-free talc resulted in mixed findings, with tumor formation in some studies. Findings from studies in women that examined the possible link between talcum powder and ovarian cancer were mixed, with some studies showing a slightly increased risk. A small increase in risk was seen in many case-control studies. No increased risk was seen in one prospective cohort study, while a modestly increased risk was seen in a second study. Increased risk of lung cancer and other respiratory diseases has been seen in some studies of talc miners and millers. Lung cancer risk was not increased with reports of cosmetic talcum powder use. One study suggested increased risk of endometrial cancer with genital talcum powder use.


Inspire a love for reading at a young age. All you need to do is to sign up for Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library (see if the program is available in your area). From there, you’ll receive one free age-appropriate book each month from the time your child is born through age 5. If the Imagination Library isn’t currently in your area, you can assist in launching a program.
When you buy Huggies Diapers (and remember, you can use coupons when you do), you will find little stickers inside the box/bag that have a code to enter for the Huggies Rewards Program. Essentially you enter those into your Huggies Account and when you acquire 500 points, you can get a FREE Jumbo pack. I made a diaper cake and had 10 codes lickety split… so those bad boys add up FAST.
Sometimes, a written letter or email telling a diaper company about your baby’s birth (especially if you have multiples) asking for a product to sample can result in some free diapers. I wouldn’t really recommend going the “sob story” route too strong, but companies want to know you, their customer. If you ever have faulty diapers, be sure to contact them as most have a guarantee and will replace your defective diapers for free.

Studies in people: Another type of study looks at cancer rates in different groups of people. Such a study might compare the cancer rate in a group exposed to a substance to the rate in a group not exposed to it, or compare it to what the expected cancer rate would be in the general population. But sometimes it can be hard to know what the results of these studies mean, because many other factors might affect the results.
Many studies in women have looked at the possible link between talcum powder and cancer of the ovary. Findings have been mixed, with some studies reporting a slightly increased risk and some reporting no increase. Many case-control studies have found a small increase in risk. But these types of studies can be biased because they often rely on a person’s memory of talc use many years earlier.  One prospective cohort study, which would not have the same type of potential bias, has not found an increased risk. A second found a modest increase in risk of one type of ovarian cancer.
This isn't the first time the company has been involved in a lawsuit over its popular powder—and it will likely face hundreds more cases in the future, according to Reuters. In May, a Missouri jury awarded $110 million to a Virginia woman who alleged that her cancer was caused by baby powder, and last October, a Missouri woman was awarded more than $70 million.
This is moisture absorbing enough to be used as a light deodorant powder, and has tea tree oil for added antibacterial stink-fighting. Smooth it on underarms, back of knees, feet – any place that tends to get sweaty. Just use good judgement before powdering up your more sensitive areas – do a small patch test to ensure this powder won’t irritate your skin.
Many of these groups work with companies such as Huggies and their Every Little Bottom program. They may also have partnerships in place with Pampers and other diaper manufacturers so that samples can be given out to parents that request them. These are just a few of the non-profits and charities that distribute free diapers, but each state will also have clothing closets that can be contacted.
Baking soda. You thought sodium bicarbonate, otherwise known as baking soda, only had 100 uses. Well, here's one more: This common pantry item can be used in place of baby powder. Some people even use it as deodorant, applying some to their underarms each morning. It can also deodorize the air. As a matter of fact, I keep one container in my pantry, one under my sink, one in my laundry room and one in the bathroom.
Destiny Diaper Bank covers the entire southwest Florida area. The non-profit almost 700,000 diapers a year to the low income and needy. They may also provide free samples or coupons to buy them. They have five sites throughout southwest Florida that they distribute diapers from, and also partner with local social service agencies. The group is run by volunteers. Cape Coral, Florida. Call (239)-549-2130.
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