There has long been controversy on whether or not you should use baby powder on your babe's behind. The American Academy of Pediatrics have warned that the teeny tiny particles can get trapped in an infant's small lungs and parents should be very careful with its use. Just last week, a lawsuit discovered that talc is linked to cancer. Pretty scary stuff! The court awarded $72 million to the plaintiff in the lawsuit, making this the first case in history against Johnson & Johnson baby powder. Considering that talc is banned in the European Union and has limited commercial use in Canada (especially in baby ware), it gives one pause in using the product.

Another great expense that many new families absorb is the cost of infant formula. Even those who breastfeed may want to keep formula around just in case – it’s quite the lifesaver! It’s also pricey in the long run. With our help you’ll be able to save a lot of money. We search out companies giving away free formula samples and share the news every time, so that you’ll find exactly what your baby needs, for free, when it’s available. One incredible advantage to free formula samples is that you can try out a number of top brands without making a financial commitment; find the one that’s best for you and your baby!


It is not clear if consumer products containing talcum powder increase cancer risk. Studies of personal use of talcum powder have had mixed results, although there is some suggestion of a possible increase in ovarian cancer risk. There is very little evidence at this time that any other forms of cancer are linked with consumer use of talcum powder.
Erica, I was very happy to see that you noted that the science on a talc/ ovarian cancer risk is inconclusive at best. It might be nice to move it closer to the start of this article. It’s important, because “evidence based science” is increasingly getting kicked to the curb and that’s a bad thing (don’t vaccinate your kids because one disproved study said they were linked and now people have died from measles). That said, J &J started making cornstarch baby powder years ago, it’s what we use.

Redhat.......its ok little man. I realise you hate yourself and must demean others to feel better about yourself. But I have to disagree with you. I think Ashley is a very sexy woman. But regardless you dont have to think she is. However the fact you went out of your way to spread hate makes it clear you also hate yourself. I hope your figure out your own issues. Maybe you'll enjoy life more
If you buy Huggies or Pampers diapers, both of them offer rewards for entering codes found on packages, or special promo codes you find online. You can also earn points for doing other things like watching their videos, leaving reviews, or reading their articles. Your points can add up over time and equal coupons for free diapers (or other rewards). Signup for Pampers Rewards HERE and/or the Huggies Rewards HERE.
But honestly, cloth diapers, as I mentioned earlier, have the most robust free diaper programs and they're the easiest to access. Groups like Giving Diapers, Giving Hope and The Rebecca Foundation's Cloth Diaper Closet offer free cloth diapers to those in need. Alternatively, you can get free or very cheap cloth diapers from online forums like Diaper Swappers that specialize in recycled (highly laundered) cloth diapers. Change-Diapers.com is a great resource with a link every Friday for cloth diaper giveaways they've found online, too.
Zabana Essentials Dry Shampoo Lavender Citrus Mint smells amazing. It's a really fresh scent without being overpowering. All the scents 0f lavender, mint, and lemon come thru when you use it. This shampoo is made with kaolin clay, avena (collodial oatmeal), arrowroot powder, sodium bicarbonate, essential oils,  and bamboo extract. With clay as the first ingredient, I find it's great for hiding greasy hair in between wet shampooing. It's 100% natural and vegan.

Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
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