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I’m seconding the concern about starches as body powders. As a nurse, I know that starches do feed yeasts that can thrive on moist skin: along any sweaty crease like the groin, under breasts, under yer butt cheeks, etc. Hospitals once used talc, then starch-based powders, now mostly neither. I’m not being a nay-sayer. Just offering a word of caution. If ya get yeasty, maybe don’t put starch there. Can’t speak to powder combos with baking soda or whatever though.

French Girl Organics range of cosmetic products are all at least 80 percent organic, with this particular product containing 95 percent certified organic or wildcrafted ingredients. This powder is based on arrowroot, rather than cornstarch, combined with kaolin white clay. It contains no synthetic fragrances or GMO products and is certified vegan safe.


But Johnson & Johnson insists a correlation between talc powder and ovarian cancer has not been proven. In a lawsuit settled in March 2017, the jury ruled in favor of Johnson & Johnson, Reuters reports. The plaintiff was Tennessee resident Nora Daniels, who alleged that she used their baby powder for 36 years and was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2013.
Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
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