There has long been controversy on whether or not you should use baby powder on your babe's behind. The American Academy of Pediatrics have warned that the teeny tiny particles can get trapped in an infant's small lungs and parents should be very careful with its use. Just last week, a lawsuit discovered that talc is linked to cancer. Pretty scary stuff! The court awarded $72 million to the plaintiff in the lawsuit, making this the first case in history against Johnson & Johnson baby powder. Considering that talc is banned in the European Union and has limited commercial use in Canada (especially in baby ware), it gives one pause in using the product.
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I use this for me. Good price point compared to other non-talc powders and will last a long time. I mainly use a little underneath "the girls" (women will understand that). My Dr. told me, after I brought it up to him, that I tend toward a type of 'yeast' issue there causing itching. Yes, it's possible! This powder is perfect to help that situation; every day and especially hot weather. (fyi-Dr. also suggested using a plain bar of soap-Dial for that particular area) My skin is very sensitive and this powder does not give me any problems. I would think this would be great for a baby's bum.
Traditionally, baby powder was used on babies to keep their bottoms dry to prevent diaper rash. This was especially important before the development of disposable diapers, which lock the moisture away from the skin. As well as being used for babies, many women through the years have also used it to keep themselves feeling dry and fresh through the day, and to prevent chafing.

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In August 2017, a jury in California ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $417 million to a woman who says she developed terminal ovarian cancer. However, a superior court judge overturned the verdict in October and ordered a new trial. In February 2016, a Missouri court ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $72 million in damages to the family of Jackie Fox, a woman who died of ovarian cancer. This verdict was also overturned in Missouri Appeals Court in October 2017.

It is not clear if consumer products containing talcum powder increase cancer risk. Studies of personal use of talcum powder have had mixed results, although there is some suggestion of a possible increase in ovarian cancer risk. There is very little evidence at this time that any other forms of cancer are linked with consumer use of talcum powder.
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Things of My Very Own, Inc.-Crisis Intervention Center, 202 Front Street, Schenectady New York 12305, 518-630-5146. The capital region and down state are covered. So if you live in Albany or New York City you can call for information on diaper assistance programs. Thousands of working poor families with young babies get the free diapers they need from this NYC non-profit.
Perhaps an even more serious danger, the tiny particles of talcum powder have been linked with an increased risk in cancer, particularly ovarian cancer, for women that have used it for feminine hygiene. The size of the particles means that it can easily enter the body and travel through the reproductive system to the ovaries, causing them to become irritated and inflamed. In early 2016 baby powder producer Johnson & Johnson were ordered to pay $51 million to the family of a woman who died of ovarian cancer, believed to have been caused by the company’s talcum powder.
Redhat.......its ok little man. I realise you hate yourself and must demean others to feel better about yourself. But I have to disagree with you. I think Ashley is a very sexy woman. But regardless you dont have to think she is. However the fact you went out of your way to spread hate makes it clear you also hate yourself. I hope your figure out your own issues. Maybe you'll enjoy life more
The charity type agencies listed below receive donations of diapers (or the money to pay for them) from local businesses, civic groups, community businesses, schools and faith-based organizations. Free samples can also be provided to some clients. The goal is to help ensure children and their parents have diapers, wipes, and other personal cleaning supplies to ensure that the child is healthy. Find a listing of resources by state below.
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