Babytime! Silky Powder soaks up extra moisture while supporting the skin's natural probiotic ecosystem, which makes it great for babies or to use down there.  The powder is enriched with sweet wild rose and probiotics for a soft touch and subtle fragrant smell. It's 95% organic, fragrance free, gluten free, and talc free body powder. The powder is made with organic tapioca startch, organic corn starch, organic marshmallow root extract, organic aloe leaf extract, organic calendula flower extract, organic rose hip fruit oil, organic rose flower oil, organic rosemary leaf oil, lactobacillus ferment lysate filtrate, allantoin, and kaolin clay. 
Children's Council provides free diaper supply monthly to families utilizing CalWORKs in San Francisco. If you have an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card, you can bring your card to one of 15 locations and you'll receive six packs of diapers each month per child under the age of three. Also, try Googling "Diaper Bank" plus your city name - there are many programs around the country and they usually use the phrase diaper bank to describe their offering.
Seattle area residents can contact WestSide Baby for free diapers. The non-profit organization is mostly run by volunteers from the community. They currently distribute almost 300,000 diapers to the low income, unemployed, and working poor in Washington. They also partner with numerous local organizations, including more than 100 social service agencies and charities. People can not only get free diapers from the organization, but they can also get toys, clothing, and baby equipment like cribs and car seats. Call (206) 767-1662
It is not clear if consumer products containing talcum powder increase cancer risk. Studies of personal use of talcum powder have had mixed results, although there is some suggestion of a possible increase in ovarian cancer risk. There is very little evidence at this time that any other forms of cancer are linked with consumer use of talcum powder.
Many studies in women have looked at the possible link between talcum powder and cancer of the ovary. Findings have been mixed, with some studies reporting a slightly increased risk and some reporting no increase. Many case-control studies have found a small increase in risk. But these types of studies can be biased because they often rely on a person’s memory of talc use many years earlier.  One prospective cohort study, which would not have the same type of potential bias, has not found an increased risk. A second found a modest increase in risk of one type of ovarian cancer.
There are several different organizations around the country that distribute free diapers to needy and low income families. Many of these are charities or churches, with some government programs also assisting. There are programs for single mothers, teenage moms, and families living in poverty. Anyone that needs free or low cost diapers near where they live, and that meets qualifications, may apply.
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