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Infant Crisis Services, Inc. helps families who are experiencing a crisis. They try to ensure that every toddler and baby gets access to life’s basic necessities. With the help of the members of the community, Infant Crisis Services supplies life-sustaining baby formula and food. In addition, they run a bank that provides free diapers and clothing for both toddlers and babies in times of crisis. Over 1,000 babies and toddlers get help in central Oklahoma and Oklahoma City every month. 405-528-3663


Seattle area residents can contact WestSide Baby for free diapers. The non-profit organization is mostly run by volunteers from the community. They currently distribute almost 300,000 diapers to the low income, unemployed, and working poor in Washington. They also partner with numerous local organizations, including more than 100 social service agencies and charities. People can not only get free diapers from the organization, but they can also get toys, clothing, and baby equipment like cribs and car seats. Call (206) 767-1662
Fantastic! My son has had some pretty big messy diapers but not once have we had a leak!! Very happy with Pampers Baby Dry diapers. We went from Pampers Swaddlers Newborn to Baby Dry size 1. With the cost savings I wanted to give them a try and they work great... Good gathers around the legs and the are snug at the waist, especially the backside. There have been some 'oh boy' moments - anticipating a leak but NOPE! My only wish is if they could have the color line indicator for wetness but I can actually tell by looking for that telltale yellow front or back (he's breastfed). It's easy to see through the outside plastic and see if you have a full diaper. Two thumbs up!! I will definitely reorder. We are 3/4 through a case and have been using them for a month.
Sometimes, a written letter or email telling a diaper company about your baby’s birth (especially if you have multiples) asking for a product to sample can result in some free diapers. I wouldn’t really recommend going the “sob story” route too strong, but companies want to know you, their customer. If you ever have faulty diapers, be sure to contact them as most have a guarantee and will replace your defective diapers for free.

I was always a Pampers user with my first kid 4 years ago and just had my second. I was given Pampers again at the hospital when he was born and loved them again from the start. I love the wetness indicator so I know when to change him, they hold everything in well, and fit great. I'll keep relying only on Pampers for this baby like I did for my first!
Modern cloth diapers come in a host of shapes, including preformed cloth diapers, all-in-one diapers with waterproof exteriors, fitted diaper with covers and pocket or "stuffable" diapers, which consist of a water-resistant outer shell sewn with an opening for insertion of absorbent material inserts.[22] Many design features of modern cloth diapers have followed directly from innovations initially developed in disposable diapers, such as the use of the hour glass shape, materials to separate moisture from skin and the use of double gussets, or an inner elastic band for better fit and containment of waste material.[21] Several cloth diaper brands use variations of Procter & Gamble's original 1973 patent use of a double gusset in Pampers.[13]

As parents ourselves, we never want your little one uncomfortable. While irritation can occur for a variety of reasons, we'd like to learn more and see how we can help. When you have a moment, please connect with us online at http://bit.ly/2IumGnR or by phone at 1-877-648-2484 anytime Monday-Friday, 7:30AM-7PM CT. One of our specialists will be happy to help since we expect nothing but the best from our products and want the same for you and your baby. We look forward to hearing back from you!

In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]

These are the thinnest diapers I have ever seen, and we have had one or more kids in diapers for the past 5 years. Huggies has been our preferred brand as we had not had any issues.... until now. When I first opened this box of diapers I thought that Huggies had a new design. Did not give it any further thought until I checked on my 18 month old and found her diaper had leaked. Thats when I had a closer look at the new Higgies diaper and compared it to one of the same brand from an earlier box(from Costco). The new diaper in addition to the design change is lighter and thinner. I guess its time to switch to another brand.


Other common features of disposable diapers include one or more pairs of either adhesive or mechanical fastening tapes to keep the diaper securely fastened. Some diapers have tapes which are refastenable to allow adjusting of fit or reapplication after inspection. Elasticized fabric single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which has not been absorbed. Some diapers lines now commonly include wetness indicators, in which a chemical included in the fabric of the diaper changes color in the presence of moisture to alert the carer or user that the diaper is wet.[20] A disposable diaper may also include an inner fabric designed to hold moisture against the skin for a brief period before absorption to alert a toilet training or bedwetting user that they have urinated. Most materials in the diaper are held together with the use of a hot-melt adhesive, which is applied in spray form or multi lines, an elastic hot melt is also used to help with pad integrity when the diaper is wet.
Basically these are the best diapers around. You look at them and think, “what is that mesh layer for?” Then one night, around 3 am, you discuss with your husband sending gifts to the makers of Pampers, specifically the engineers and designers who made said mesh layer. You have enough to think about as a new parent. Just buys these diapers would ya?
Women and Children's Center of the Sierras, 3905 Neil Road, Suite 2, Reno Nevada 89509, (775) 825-7395. If you live in Las Vegas or the Clark County region, call this agency or use the following resource for referrals and additional information. Diapers, food stamps applications, and other support for pregnant mothers and low income parents is offered. Find diapers in Clark County and Las Vegas.
In the hospital, Pampers Swaddlers will (probably) be the first diaper to hit your baby’s bottom. I am very happy with the performance of Pampers; they are soft, fit well, and contain leaks. Pampers Swaddlers are incredibly soft and have an umbilical cord notch for newbies. They also have a line that changes color to indicate wetness (Swaddlers also come in a Sensitive version).
If you’re spending that much, and you’re in the market for something with a few more bells and whistles, I also like the Hatch Baby Grow ($129), an integrated baby scale and changing pad in one. The scale allows you to track weight gain, milk intake and other such things that are typically only ascertained by a visit to a pediatrician’s office. I would especially recommend this for parents who are the “need to know” type (those who like to have lots of data) or if you have any reason to expect a preemie (you are pregnant with multiples, high risk, etc.).
All those diaper expenses add up. In its first year, a baby can go through 2,500 to 3,000 diapers, costing parents between $500 and $1,000, said Jen Dicks Burg, blogger at the The Suburban Mom and mother to three girls. BabyCenter, an online media company for parents and expectant parents, estimates that disposable diapers cost $72 per month for the first year (or $864 a year), based on a survey of more than 1,000 new moms.
[Aside: Look, every time I throw a diaper in the trash can, I feel bad, okay? I am otherwise a very good citizen of the earth: I recycle and compost, I take mass transit every day instead of driving, I [used to] make baby food instead of buying it in the jar… but when it came to scooping poop from a diaper into the toilet, then washing a bunch of poop-stained diapers in the washing machine (for which I had to use COINS because we rented an apartment in the City), my head started to explode. I’m sorry, Mother Earth. I hope you’ll find it in your earthy heart to forgive me. I still love you.]
Babies may have their diapers changed five or more times a day.[23] Parents and other primary child care givers often carry spare diapers and necessities for diaper changing in a specialized diaper bag. Diapering may possibly serve as a good bonding experience for parent and child.[24] Children who wear diapers may experience skin irritation, commonly referred to as diaper rash, due to continual contact with fecal matter, as feces contains urease which catalyzes the conversion of the urea in urine to ammonia which can irritate the skin and can cause painful redness.[25]
We have tried almost all other brands including, Target, Luvs and Huggies. Although usually more expensive, Pampers by far have done a better job with diaper rash. We change diapers probably more than usual (approx.) 12-15/day. That said, the other than Pampers diapers left red rashes on bottom. Some of the rashes looked like open wounds. On a hunch, I believed it was from the specific diapers. Sure enough, the Pampers and the mesh lining did away with the rash. I did apply cream to alleviate rash but I usually don't have to use if baby is in Pampers swaddlers. It's true that you get what you pay ft
Pampers Diapers and Huggies have a rewards program. They have unique one time use codes found inside the packages of diapers and some wipes. Save those and enter them on their websites (after making an account-when you sign up for pampers you will get 100 pts) When you have a certain amount of points, you can cash in for Free rewards. There are a ton of different items, and they change them too. When I reached 1,000 points I cashed out for a Dora Potty Seat for my youngest! Yay!

"Good-fitting diapers are important to the healthy growth and development of our smallest patients," said Anjanette Lee, MS, CCC/SLP, NTMTC, an infant development specialist at Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital in Houston, Texas, one of nine Level III and Level IV NICUs that tested the new diaper. "In our experience, we found Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers conformed to the baby's bottom without gapping or limiting leg movement. The thinner fasteners and less material at the waist provided a good fit for baby while still protecting their fragile skin."


Ok, these diapers are getting 3 stars because they HAVE held in what they're supposed to hold in. However, I really hate the texture of the diapers. They are "plastic-y". I LOVE the Pampers Swaddlers because they are soft, almost fabric-feeling. I bought a huge box of the Baby Dry kind because they were a few bucks cheaper, and thank God we are almost out of this box because I hate the plastic texture of the diaper. I guess that's just personal preference since they seem to perform just fine, but I prefer to have a soft little baby butt when I hold my little one, not a squishy plastic butt!
These early diapers were bulky, heavy products composed of fluff pulp with a rayon topsheet, polyethylene backsheet. In 1966, Pampers launched a 'wingfold' design and by 1969 started a "third size". By this time, Pampers had become a national brand in the United States.[citation needed] Procter and Gamble replaced the pin-on design with tapes in 1971. Toddler and Premature Infant sizes were also introduced. In 1973, P&G developed elasticized single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas to aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which had not been absorbed. In fact, the first patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper was in 1973 by P&G.[1] In 1982, Pampers introduced an elasticized wingfold diaper with elastic leg gathers and refastenable tapes which was a cross between the early 1960s design and the modern hourglass shape, a feature that was first introduced on Luvs in 1976 and evolved into an industry standard in 1985.[citation needed] In 1986, thin diapers made with absorbent gelling material were released. This made the average weight of a typical medium size diaper decrease by 50%.[2] In 1987, Pampers and Huggies both introduced frontal tape systems which allow repositioning of the lateral tape without tearing the diaper. In the 1990s Pampers introduced a thinner diaper known as Ultra Dry Thins.
Some disposable diapers include fragrance, lotions or essential oils in order to help mask the scent of a soiled diaper, or to protect the skin. Care of disposable diapers is minimal, and primarily consists of keeping them in a dry place before use, with proper disposal in a garbage receptacle upon soiling. Stool is supposed to be deposited in the toilet, but is generally put in the garbage with the rest of the diaper.

In October 2008, "An updated lifecycle assessment study for disposable and reusable nappies" by the UK Environment Agency and Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs stated that reusable diapers can cause significantly less (up to 40 per cent) or significantly more damage to the environment than disposable ones, depending mostly on how parents wash and dry them. The "baseline scenario" showed that the difference in green-house emissions was insignificant (in fact, disposables even scored slightly better). However, much better results (emission cuts of up to 40 per cent) could be achieved by using reusable diapers more rationally. "The report shows that, in contrast to the use of disposable nappies, it is consumers' behaviour after purchase that determines most of the impacts from reusable nappies. Cloth nappy users can reduce their environmental impacts by:
Don't get me wrong, I was exceedingly grateful for those things. Baby messes are something special, that's for sure. But between diapers, wipes, creams, ointments, new sheets and sleepers, stain remover, and sweat equity, the expense of it all is fairly extreme. It can put a heavy burden on families. No one should ever wonder how they're going to keep their baby clean in 2017, but here we are. In the United States, there is no government program available that pays for diapers. WIC and food stamps only cover nutrition, leaving families in the lurch when it comes to basics like diapers, wipes, and feminine hygiene products. In some states, they're even a taxable good, which seems to be just an insult to injury, but there you have it.
The baby and children section here at Walgreens.com includes supplies for feeding, clothing and bathing. You can gently wash your baby with baby wash, no tears shampoo and baby conditioner. For infants, browse bottle feeding supplies that include bottles, nipples and burp cloths. If you have older kids, there's children's nutrition options such as puddings, shakes and other drinks.
For more than 50 years, parents have trusted Pampers to care for their babies. Pampers is a part of The Procter & Gamble Company (NYSE:PG) and is the #1-selling diaper worldwide. Every day, more than 25 million babies in 100 countries around the world wear Pampers. Pampers offers a complete range of diapers, wipes and training pants designed to provide protection and comfort for every stage of baby’s development. Visit www.pampers.com to learn more about Pampers products, join the Pampers Rewards program, and find ideas and information to help your baby get the most out of love, sleep and play.
Amazon – You can get a FREE Baby Welcome Box worth $35 when you create a baby registry at Amazon. One of my favorite things I received was a large package of sensitive baby wipes. The contents of the box varies, but you’ll definitely get some full-size baby products and lots of samples for Mom and Baby. This offer is available for Amazon Prime members. If you’re not a member yet, get a free 30 day trial here. As a member, you’ll save 20% off diapers and wipes, 20% off household items, and get FREE 2-day shipping so it’s definitely worth a try! Make sure to request your welcome box before your free trial ends. 😉 To be eligible for the free baby box, you’ll need to create a baby registry. For complete details, click here.
Of course, diapers are just one of the many expenses parents incur by raising a child; parents can spend up to $24,000 in the first year alone. Subscription services for diapers can seem convenient, but aren’t the most economical, Burg added. “Those who coupon and deal hunt are able to significantly reduce that number, but that takes dedication,” she said.
The Atlanta Community Food Bank provides free diapers in partnership with local charities and national businesses such as Pampers and Huggies Every Little Bottom Program assistance. Many of the cloth or disposable diapers distributed are available to low income because the box may have been damaged by the retailer, but the products themselves are in great condition. Some may refer to them as salvaged. Atlanta Georgia (404) 892-3333.
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