WARINING To avoid risk of choking, do not allow your child to tear the covering. Choking may result from anything children put in their mouths. Discard any torn or unsealed diaper. CAUTION: Like almost any article of clothing, disposable diapers will burn if exposed to flame. Always keep your child away from any source of flame. IMPORTANT: Shake baby soil into toilet. Wrap diaper inside its backsheet before discarding.DO NOT FLUSH DIAPER. PLEASE DO NOT LITTER. Made in the U.S.A. with domestic and imported parts.

In the first couple of months, you may find yourself changing diapers up to 10 times in 24 hours. Diapers should be changed whenever they are wet or soiled. Your baby will often (but not always) let you know. With a super-absorbent diaper like Pampers diapers, you can tell if it's wet by feeling for lumps in the absorbent material. Here are some common times for changing diapers:

Otherwise, another great option to save money on diapers is signing up for Amazon Family. You have to become an Amazon Prime Member (which means paying $99/year, however you can Try Amazon Prime with their 30-Day Free Trial first!) but you will get free two-day shipping on millions of items and unlimited music and video streaming along with your awesome diaper savings of 20% off diaper subscriptions! Plus, you can get a 15% Amazon Baby Registry completion discount. The diaper boxes from Amazon are also bigger and will cost less per diaper often than your local stores, plus you won’t have to spend gas to go pick it up!
Diapers have been worn throughout human history. They are made of cloth or synthetic disposable materials. Cloth diapers are composed of layers of fabric such as cotton, hemp, bamboo, microfiber, or even plastic fibers such as PLA, and can be washed and reused multiple times. Disposable diapers contain absorbent chemicals and are thrown away after use. Plastic pants can be worn over diapers to avoid leaks, but with modern cloth diapers, this is no longer necessary.[citation needed]
The first disposable diaper was invented in 1946 by Marion Donovan, a professional-turned-housewife who wanted to ensure her children's cloth diapers remained dry while they slept.[16] Donovan patented her design (called 'Boaters') in 1951. She also invented the first paper diapers, but executives did not invest in this idea and it was consequently scrapped for over ten years, until Procter & Gamble used Donovan's design ideas to create Pampers.
Do you want free diaper samples, wipes, plus more free baby stuff? To save you time and money, I’ve created a list of 11 Free Diaper Resources below. Browse the list and click on the blue links of any offer(s) you’re interested in. You will be taken to a website to fill out a request form. Complete the form and then the manufacturer will mail the freebies to you. That’s it! 🙂

Otherwise, another great option to save money on diapers is signing up for Amazon Family. You have to become an Amazon Prime Member (which means paying $99/year, however you can Try Amazon Prime with their 30-Day Free Trial first!) but you will get free two-day shipping on millions of items and unlimited music and video streaming along with your awesome diaper savings of 20% off diaper subscriptions! Plus, you can get a 15% Amazon Baby Registry completion discount. The diaper boxes from Amazon are also bigger and will cost less per diaper often than your local stores, plus you won’t have to spend gas to go pick it up!

These early diapers were bulky, heavy products composed of fluff pulp with a rayon topsheet, polyethylene backsheet. In 1966, Pampers launched a 'wingfold' design and by 1969 started a "third size". By this time, Pampers had become a national brand in the United States.[citation needed] Procter and Gamble replaced the pin-on design with tapes in 1971. Toddler and Premature Infant sizes were also introduced. In 1973, P&G developed elasticized single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas to aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which had not been absorbed. In fact, the first patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper was in 1973 by P&G.[1] In 1982, Pampers introduced an elasticized wingfold diaper with elastic leg gathers and refastenable tapes which was a cross between the early 1960s design and the modern hourglass shape, a feature that was first introduced on Luvs in 1976 and evolved into an industry standard in 1985.[citation needed] In 1986, thin diapers made with absorbent gelling material were released. This made the average weight of a typical medium size diaper decrease by 50%.[2] In 1987, Pampers and Huggies both introduced frontal tape systems which allow repositioning of the lateral tape without tearing the diaper. In the 1990s Pampers introduced a thinner diaper known as Ultra Dry Thins.
In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]
I agree to be a Huggies Club Member. By being a member, I agree that Kimberly-Clark Singapore Pte Ltd and its parent companies and related entities ("K-C") and K-C's agents may collect, use and store all the personal data provided for marketing, survey, promotional and research purposes, including sending you information about K-C products and promotions.
The eco-factor — The sad truth is that 3.5 million tons of diapers end up in landfills every year. While cloth diapers don’t end up in the landfill, they do require lots of water and power to launder. Some say the carbon footprint of cloth and other eco diapers may not be that much less, in reality. (You can reduce the carbon footprint of cloth diapers by washing them in cold water and hanging them to dry.) What about disposable diapers? We recommend fragrance-free diapers, as toxic chemicals can be lumped in with a “fragrance” so they don’t have to be disclosed on the list of ingredients (due to “trade secret” laws). We also prefer chlorine-free diapers if they’re available to you.
If you can’t afford diapers right now, then I want to mention that there are loads of places that give out FREE Diapers to those in need. They are called “Diaper Banks” and they are on a mission to make up for the diaper “gap” in order for every baby to have clean diapers. If you have extra diapers, BabyCycle in St. Pete and HereWeGrow in Dunedin are both in desperate need of your diapers.
Earlier this month, Procter & Gamble PG, +0.82%  Pampers’ parent company, announced this week that prices for Pampers products will increase by an average of 4%, though it depends on the size and type of diaper as well as the retailer. Target TGT, -2.09% sells a 100-count pack of Pampers Swaddlers diapers for $24.99, which, with the increase, would rise to almost $26.
Nice old, soft bits of good Turkish towelling, properly washed, will make the softest of diaper coverings, inside which specially absorbent napkins (diapers), see below at 1A, soft, light, and easily washed, are contained. These should rarely be soiled once regular habits have been inculcated, especially during the night period in which it is most important to prevent habit formation
But honestly, cloth diapers, as I mentioned earlier, have the most robust free diaper programs and they're the easiest to access. Groups like Giving Diapers, Giving Hope and The Rebecca Foundation's Cloth Diaper Closet offer free cloth diapers to those in need. Alternatively, you can get free or very cheap cloth diapers from online forums like Diaper Swappers that specialize in recycled (highly laundered) cloth diapers. Change-Diapers.com is a great resource with a link every Friday for cloth diaper giveaways they've found online, too.
BEWARE!!! Just because the box looks like Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max Diapers, these are NOT the same. My son is now 5 mo. old and we've been using Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max diapers since he was born (you know, with the blue wetness indicator on the front). However, these are NOT Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max. These are thinner, do not have the woven material inside the diaper and are not nearly as absorbent as the Swaddlers. My son has leaked out of his diaper the last 5 nights... these diapers simply are not absorbent enough to contain a night's worth of pee. We rarely had this problem with Dry Max. I won't be buying these again- they simply aren't worth the very little cost savings.

Before I dive into some of the awesome ways you can access free diapers, I think it's important to acknowledge that we're a diverse community of mamas here, and all of our needs are different. While every parent in the world could appreciate free diapers now and then, many moms are dealing with financial hardships that make the prospect of getting free diapers essential. One in three American families do not have enough diapers to keep their baby clean, dry and healthy, according to the National Diaper Bank Network.
Do you want free diaper samples, wipes, plus more free baby stuff? To save you time and money, I’ve created a list of 11 Free Diaper Resources below. Browse the list and click on the blue links of any offer(s) you’re interested in. You will be taken to a website to fill out a request form. Complete the form and then the manufacturer will mail the freebies to you. That’s it! 🙂

You’ll also need 2 or 3 changing pad covers (roughly $10 a piece). They get soiled pretty quickly so you’ll need more than one. On top of the changing pad cover, you will also need a whole bunch of waterproof pads (the white pad) as an added layer of protection — these are much easier to wash than the covers, and run $13 for a 3 pack. Get a whole bunch; you’ll be washing them all the time.
"We're passionate about helping all babies thrive, especially the smallest and most fragile. This Huggies diaper reflects our ongoing commitment to deliver innovative solutions for the NICU," said Eleonora Daireaux, Vice President, Huggies North America. "After hearing of the need for a diaper that meets the special requirements of these babies, our expert teams in skin science, research, product safety and manufacturing were inspired. Knowing every second counts for these babies, the team acted quickly to bring Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers from concept to launch in hospitals in just six months."
The only thing you get is some coupons and sample packs of infant formula from enfamil. Oh, and a bunch of spam emails from the companies they sell your email address too. Not worth the hundreds of questions you have to answer and other offers you have to sign up for. Your hospital will give you a bag with a can of formula and sometimes coupons from some companies they use (Johnson and Johnson) and that’s about it. When I had my daughter in December all I got was a bag and my nurses were wonderful and gave us extra diapers, wipes, wash and lotion but it came from the hospitals stash and nothing that Gerber gives to them to give each new mom like they did in 20012 and 2005 when I had my other kids.

Never underestimate the love and charity of your family and friends. Some friends have diapers their child outgrew too fast and have stowed away in their closet, begging to be used to assist you. Your parents may be willing to set up a subscribe and save subscription for you through Amazon and pay for your diapers monthly as a little gift for you. Or they may love buying diapers for you from a store. You never know unless you ask.
Give your baby the best start with a comfortable, absorbent diaper that provides up to 12 hours of protection. Cuties diapers and wipes are made with love to keep your baby’s skin soft and healthy: both have a hypoallergenic extra soft liner with natural botanicals, Vitamin E and aloe.  The diaper features a stretch waistband and nonwoven back sheet that keeps comfort a priority and the liquid resistant inner leg cuff works to prevent any leaks. The wipes use Tri-Form technology for a fabric with two outer layers to protect baby’s skin, and a durable inner layer prevents tears.
This diaper is very economical and does what it needs to do. It doesn't have the wetness indicator but you can feel or smell for yourself if the diaper is wet. Because of its thinness, you can also see clearly when your baby poops. I prefer the diapers with the wetness indicator. This one does what it needs to do; there's nothing fancy about it. If your baby has a sensitive bottom, though, I would recommend using another type of diaper. There's a reason this one is cheaper than the others.
During the 1950s, companies such as Johnson and Johnson, Kendall, Parke-Davis, Playtex, and Molnlycke entered the disposable diaper market, and in 1956, Procter & Gamble began researching disposable diapers. Victor Mills, along with his project group including William Dehaas (both men who worked for the company) invented what would be trademarked "Pampers". Although Pampers were conceptualized in 1959, the diapers themselves were not launched into the market until 1961.[11] Pampers now accounts for more than $10 billion in annual revenue at Procter & Gamble.[12]

I noticed something different about these diapers, 1. was the character print which I liked. 2. was the quilted pattern on the inside of the diaper and 3. the blue strip liner. I also unfortunately noticed that these diapers consistently leaked at night. I at first thought that I hadn't pulled the side tabs snug enough but after having my baby waking up wet night after night I knew it was not user error but that these diapers suck. These diapers may absorb more but they leak out some of the moisture that they've absorbed. I have some of the older version of snug and dry left over that I use at night but these "new" version I will only use during the day. I also noticed that these new diapers cause itchiness on my sons private parts I have to apply a bit more diaper cream to prevent him from having irritation. I don't like these new diapers and wish I could get some sort of refund otherwise I may have to switch back to using pampers. They cost a tad bit more but pampers in this case is a better product. I have Huggies on amazon prime auto-shipment but will stop any future shipment.


These are my favorite diapers and a favorite among eco-moms. They are hypoallergenic, chlorine-free, affordable, and perform exceptionally well. IMO, these diapers are the best combo of eco-friendly and absorbent. All of that, and they cost about the same as Pampers or Huggies. Some users say they run smaller than these mainstream brands, just FYI.
Earlier this month, Procter & Gamble PG, +0.82%  Pampers’ parent company, announced this week that prices for Pampers products will increase by an average of 4%, though it depends on the size and type of diaper as well as the retailer. Target TGT, -2.09% sells a 100-count pack of Pampers Swaddlers diapers for $24.99, which, with the increase, would rise to almost $26.
Care for your baby's delicate skin from the very start with HUGGIES Natural Care Baby Wipes. Safe for sensitive skin, Natural Care Wipes contain 99% triple-filtered water for a pure, gentle clean. Plus, they are pH-balanced to help maintain your newborn's natural skin barrier and enriched with aloe and vitamin E to help keep skin healthy and conditioned. The #1 branded wipe*, HUGGIES Wipes are dermatologically tested and hypo-allergenic. In addition, Natural Care sensitive wipes are fragrance-free, alcohol-free and paraben-free, and they contain no phenoxyethanol or MIT. You can feel confident you're giving your baby a safe, gentle clean with every wipe. HUGGIES Natural Care moist wipes come in a wide variety of package sizes and styles, perfect for use at home and on the go: travel pack, flip-top pack, refill pack, reusable pop-up tub and the stylish Clutch 'N' Clean refillable travel pack. Don't get caught without wipes. Order online for convenient delivery right to your doorstep.

As a first time mom it was pretty overwhelming having to decide on what to use for my baby. Everything including baby wash, lotion, laundry detergent, wipes, and diapers come in so many varieties I didn’t know where to start. I was lucky enough to receive sample diapers from about 5 different brands including Pampers Swaddlers. These are the only diapers that never let me down. Super soft, no leaks, ultra absorbent, great fit. Without giving TMI, there have been many moments where I was surprised by how much they contained. And without leaks! I also have peace of mind knowing that my baby can stay in his diaper all night if necessary without any worry of leaks or discomfort. It was also a very smooth transition into bigger sizes. We started off with newborn, then into size 1 and now size 2. When we’re done with our current box then we will most likely purchase size 3 for our 3 1/2 month old baby. I just really love how reliable the Pampers Swaddlers are and intend on using these the entire time our baby’s in diapers.
Seattle area residents can contact WestSide Baby for free diapers. The non-profit organization is mostly run by volunteers from the community. They currently distribute almost 300,000 diapers to the low income, unemployed, and working poor in Washington. They also partner with numerous local organizations, including more than 100 social service agencies and charities. People can not only get free diapers from the organization, but they can also get toys, clothing, and baby equipment like cribs and car seats. Call (206) 767-1662
×