Disclaimer: While we work to ensure that product information is correct, on occasion manufacturers may alter their ingredient lists. Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and/or different information than that shown on our Web site. We recommend that you do not solely rely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. For additional information about a product, please contact the manufacturer. Content on this site is for reference purposes and is not intended to substitute for advice given by a physician, pharmacist, or other licensed health-care professional. You should not use this information as self-diagnosis or for treating a health problem or disease. Contact your health-care provider immediately if you suspect that you have a medical problem. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or health condition. Amazon.com assumes no liability for inaccuracies or misstatements about products.
A diaper (American English) or a nappy (Australian English and British English) is a type of underwear that allows the wearer to defecate or urinate without the use of a toilet, by absorbing or containing waste products to prevent soiling of outer clothing or the external environment. When diapers become soiled, they require changing, generally by a second person such as a parent or caregiver. Failure to change a diaper on a sufficiently regular basis can result in skin problems around the area covered by the diaper.
In October 2008, "An updated lifecycle assessment study for disposable and reusable nappies" by the UK Environment Agency and Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs stated that reusable diapers can cause significantly less (up to 40 per cent) or significantly more damage to the environment than disposable ones, depending mostly on how parents wash and dry them. The "baseline scenario" showed that the difference in green-house emissions was insignificant (in fact, disposables even scored slightly better). However, much better results (emission cuts of up to 40 per cent) could be achieved by using reusable diapers more rationally. "The report shows that, in contrast to the use of disposable nappies, it is consumers' behaviour after purchase that determines most of the impacts from reusable nappies. Cloth nappy users can reduce their environmental impacts by:
As of 2018, name-brand, mid-range disposable diapers in the U.S., such as Huggies and Pampers, were sold at an average cost of approximately US $0.20 to $0.30 cents each, and their manufacturers earned about two cents in profit from each diaper sold.[44] Premium brands had eco-friendly features, and sold for approximately twice that price.[44] Generic disposable diapers cost less per diaper, at an average price of $0.15 cents each, and the typical manufacturer's profit was about one cent per diaper.[44] However, the low-cost diapers needed to be changed more frequently, so the total cost savings was limited, as the lower cost per diaper was offset by the need to buy more diapers.[44]

Kelly – yes they are encouraging breastfeeding – but there are many of our visitors who are receiving the free diaper bags. Enfamil has a new diaper bag that contains bottles for pumped (expressed) milk, milk storage bags, and other samples for breastfeeding included with the free formula. You may want to call Enfamil, Similac, and Gerber directly to request free samples. 🙂
Cost — A quick calculation: unless you are using a clean-at-home cloth diaper system, you will be spending *roughly* $40/month on diapers. Some diapers are cheaper, like store brands. Some are more expensive. You may decide, after getting pooped on multiple times, that a higher quality diaper is worth the extra money. Or maybe you’re into it (hard for me to say, we just met). According to Consumer Reports, the average family spends about $2,500 on diapers per child. If you opt for eco-friendly (more pricey) diapers –  good for you, btw –  that number is even higher: $3,500.
Another favorite is the Munchkin Step Diaper Pail ($64), which wins the odor control contest. This pail requires special bags and uses a baking soda dispenser (which you also have to refill) to control odor. It does require a bit of diaper-squishing, but not nearly as much as the Diaper Genie. If odor control is a top priority and you don’t mind buying special bags, this is your go-to.
Do you want free diaper samples, wipes, plus more free baby stuff? To save you time and money, I’ve created a list of 11 Free Diaper Resources below. Browse the list and click on the blue links of any offer(s) you’re interested in. You will be taken to a website to fill out a request form. Complete the form and then the manufacturer will mail the freebies to you. That’s it! 🙂
In the 20th century, the disposable diaper was conceived. In the 1930s, Robinsons of Chesterfield had what were labeled "Destroyable Babies Napkins" listed in their catalogue for the wholesale market.[5] In 1944, Hugo Drangel of the Swedish paper company Pauliström suggested a conceptual design which would entail the placing of sheets of paper tissue (cellulose wadding) inside the cloth diaper and rubber pants. However, cellulose wadding was rough against the skin and crumbled into balls when exposed to moisture.
A diaper bank known as Happy Bottoms serves people in the Kansas City area. The organization is a partnership of Cornerstones of Care and Healthy Families of Kansas City. The goal is to coordinate free diaper drives that will then go ahead and support local agencies serving low income families in the community. They also offer information on WIC and government benefits. Provides free diapers to Kansas City area agencies and social service groups.

Diapers and diaperlike products are sometimes used on pets, laboratory animals, or working animals. This is often due to the animal not being housebroken, or for older, sick, or injured pets who have become incontinent. In some cases, these are simply baby diapers with holes cut for the tails to fit through. In other cases, they are diaperlike waste collection devices.
With our 1st child we relayed on swaddlers as much as possible. She was a skinny baby and they fit her around the lags and waist the best of all brands. We moved to another brand as she got older and more active because of the need for the extra fastening support none of the pampers have, but the swddlers always fit her the best and we had never had a blow out. Now on baby #2 and saddly this chunky child makes the waist fit a bit too tight. Swaddlers worked much better for our 1st child than it os for our second. Baby #2 has had the mesh liner stick to her when she her diapers comes off, it would not be so great to peel that off her if she had a rash. Sizing up makes the legs too big so we are using up our stock and moving to another brand for our 2nd baby. But for our 1st we still buy pampers when we can its just a hair more affordable. Overall swaddlers are a good diaper for a skinnier child than a chunky baby from my experience, i only wish they would find a way so the mesh didn't stick to your child as that happened all the time with both children.
To help support new and expecting moms, Target is giving away a free Welcome Kit when you set up a baby registry.  The kit includes $50+ worth of coupons and free diapers. After creating your registry, visit the Target service desk to pick up your free Welcome Kit. Items may vary by stores, but may include: Munchkin bottle, Lansinoh samples, MAM Newborn pacifier, Honest Wipes, and Diapers sample pack, Baby Bag and much more!
Cindy – the formula companies do change their freebie offers from time-to-time. I received a free diaper bag from Enfamil with a cooler pack, 2 free cans of formula, and other baby samples. Similac & Gerber both sent me cans of formula and coupons but not in an actual diaper bag. Some of our visitors have received the free diaper bags at the hospital when they delivered their baby. However, not all hospitals participate.
In October 2008, "An updated lifecycle assessment study for disposable and reusable nappies" by the UK Environment Agency and Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs stated that reusable diapers can cause significantly less (up to 40 per cent) or significantly more damage to the environment than disposable ones, depending mostly on how parents wash and dry them. The "baseline scenario" showed that the difference in green-house emissions was insignificant (in fact, disposables even scored slightly better). However, much better results (emission cuts of up to 40 per cent) could be achieved by using reusable diapers more rationally. "The report shows that, in contrast to the use of disposable nappies, it is consumers' behaviour after purchase that determines most of the impacts from reusable nappies. Cloth nappy users can reduce their environmental impacts by:
The Diaper Bank of Greater Atlanta, 2774 North Cobb Pkwy. Ste. 109-353, Kennesaw, Georgia 30152, phone (404) 910-3242. Both Fulton County low income families and residents of metro Atlanta can receive assistance in the form of free diapers, baby wipes, referrals, and meals. There is also help for DeKalb County families. More free diapers in Atlanta.
×