Another favorite is the Munchkin Step Diaper Pail ($64), which wins the odor control contest. This pail requires special bags and uses a baking soda dispenser (which you also have to refill) to control odor. It does require a bit of diaper-squishing, but not nearly as much as the Diaper Genie. If odor control is a top priority and you don’t mind buying special bags, this is your go-to.

The baby and children section here at Walgreens.com includes supplies for feeding, clothing and bathing. You can gently wash your baby with baby wash, no tears shampoo and baby conditioner. For infants, browse bottle feeding supplies that include bottles, nipples and burp cloths. If you have older kids, there's children's nutrition options such as puddings, shakes and other drinks.
Wrap your baby in a diaper that's 2x softer and the #1 Choice of Hospitals, Nurses and Parents. Its comforting Heart Quilts liner provides breathability and comfort while pulling wetness and mess away from the skin. In addition, Air Channels help distribute moisture evenly, providing up to 12 hours of protection, while a Wetness Indicator tells you when your baby might need a change. For complete comfort, the outer cover is Blankie Soft with a special Umbilical Cord Notch to protect your newborn baby's belly with a perfectly contoured fit (sizes N-2). Hospitals: based on hospital sales data; nurses: vs. other hospital brands, among those with a preference; parents: based on retail sales. vs. the every-day-of-the-year brand
As a first time mom, I started off using the brand given to me in the hospital, but quickly noticed it was irritating my newborns skin.. i tried some other brands with no succwss until tried huggies and i will never go back, they are super absorbant and soft inside for comfort. I have some pregnant friends and make sure to tell everyone how great huggies are!! The snug and dry are the best diapers ive ever used! 10 out of 10.
For the design-conscious, an awesome yet pricier diaper pail is the Ubbi Steel Diaper Pail (right). At $69, this sleek diaper pail comes in dozens of different colors, is made of odor-blocking steel, AND doesn’t require special bags–  it’s the top selling diaper pail on Amazon. If you have the money, the Ubbi is as good as it gets. And really? This is a worthwhile place to spend a little extra. If you have more than one kid, you could be using this for years.

Amazon Family is a program I highly recommend, although it’s not as good as it used to be (formerly known as Amazon Mom). With your Amazon Prime membership ($99 per year with a free 30-day trial), you get free 2-day shipping, PLUS 20% off diapers when ordered with Subscribe & Save. The savings on shipping for last-minute birthday and holidays gifts alone is worth it to me, but if you don’t shop a lot online, it may not make sense.


A baby may need to be changed up to 14 times a day, which makes buying diapers and wipes in bulk a smart and convenient solution. Stock up on baby wipes designed to keep your baby's face, hands and bottom clean and soft. Choose from wipes that feature soothing aloe, are eco-friendly, or fragrance-free for sensitive skin. From preemie to toddler sizes, you can wrap your baby in a diaper that gently hugs their body and offers superb absorbent protection both day and night.
In the hospital, Pampers Swaddlers will (probably) be the first diaper to hit your baby’s bottom. I am very happy with the performance of Pampers; they are soft, fit well, and contain leaks. Pampers Swaddlers are incredibly soft and have an umbilical cord notch for newbies. They also have a line that changes color to indicate wetness (Swaddlers also come in a Sensitive version).
"Good-fitting diapers are important to the healthy growth and development of our smallest patients," said Anjanette Lee, MS, CCC/SLP, NTMTC, an infant development specialist at Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital in Houston, Texas, one of nine Level III and Level IV NICUs that tested the new diaper. "In our experience, we found Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers conformed to the baby's bottom without gapping or limiting leg movement. The thinner fasteners and less material at the waist provided a good fit for baby while still protecting their fragile skin."
There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
Cloth diapers are reusable and can be made from natural fibers, synthetic materials, or a combination of both.[21] They are often made from industrial cotton which may be bleached white or left the fiber's natural color. Other natural fiber cloth materials include wool, bamboo, and unbleached hemp. Man-made materials such as an internal absorbent layer of microfiber toweling or an external waterproof layer of polyurethane laminate (PUL) may be used. Polyester fleece and faux suedecloth are often used inside cloth diapers as a "stay-dry" wicking liner because of the non-absorbent properties of those synthetic fibers.
At the time the Pampers Size 6 were introduced, there was a debate between a pediatrician, T. Berry Brazelton, and syndicated columnist and best-selling author of books for parents, John Rosemond. The controversy was about the length of time a baby should wear diapers and when to start toilet training. Rosemond believes it is a "slap to the intelligence of a human being that one would allow baby to continue soiling and wetting him/herself past age 2."[20] While Rosemond concedes that Brazelton has been giving the same advice for decades, he criticized the pediatrician for serving as a consultant to Pampers, a division of Procter & Gamble, and for appearing in Pampers commercials.[21]
There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
"We're passionate about helping all babies thrive, especially the smallest and most fragile. This Huggies diaper reflects our ongoing commitment to deliver innovative solutions for the NICU," said Eleonora Daireaux, Vice President, Huggies North America. "After hearing of the need for a diaper that meets the special requirements of these babies, our expert teams in skin science, research, product safety and manufacturing were inspired. Knowing every second counts for these babies, the team acted quickly to bring Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers from concept to launch in hospitals in just six months."
Do you have a favorite brand that also makes diapers? I really like the dish soap from Seventh Generation, and they also have baby diapers. Sign up for their “Generation Good” club and you might get selected to receive product samples! Start noticing the companies you use that also make diapers, and reach out to them to see if you can try a sample from them!
Wrap your baby in Pampers Swaddlers diapers, our most trusted comfort and protection and the #1 choice of US hospitals.* Our Blankie Soft™ diaper with a unique Absorb Away Liner™ pulls wetness and mess away from baby's skin to help keep your baby comfortable. It also has a color-changing wetness indicator that tells you when your baby might need a change. And we make sure your baby's delicate belly is protected with the contoured umbilical notch.**

Kimberly-Clark (NYSE: KMB) and its well-known global brands are an indispensable part of life for people in more than 175 countries. Every day, nearly a quarter of the world's population trust Kimberly-Clark brands and the solutions they provide to enhance their health, hygiene and well-being. With brands such as Kleenex, Scott, Huggies, Pull-Ups, Kotex and Depend, Kimberly-Clark holds the No.1 or No. 2 share position in 80 countries. To keep up with the latest news and to learn more about the company's 145-year history of innovation, visit www.kimberly-clark.com or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
Did you know that when you sign up for a free magazine it puts your name on a list that says that you probably have young children? And you know who would like to send you promotional items (and maybe coupons) because you have small children? Diaper companies! Diaper companies buy marketing lists so that they can send you advertisements to win you over. Plus, lots of times the FREE Magazine Subscriptions I receive come with bonus coupons inside! Randomly I will see Huggies, Pampers or Luvs coupons.
All those diaper expenses add up. In its first year, a baby can go through 2,500 to 3,000 diapers, costing parents between $500 and $1,000, said Jen Dicks Burg, blogger at the The Suburban Mom and mother to three girls. BabyCenter, an online media company for parents and expectant parents, estimates that disposable diapers cost $72 per month for the first year (or $864 a year), based on a survey of more than 1,000 new moms.

Most children no longer wear diapers when past two to four years of age, depending on culture, diaper type, parental habits, and the child's personality.[28] However, it is becoming increasingly common for children as old as five to still be wearing diapers because of their parents' neglect or the child's opposition to toilet training. This can pose a number of problems if the child is sent to school wearing diapers, including teasing from classmates and health issues resulting from soiled diapers. Teachers' groups—who are attributing the epidemic to an increase in full-time day care use—are requesting that diapered children be banned from the classroom.[citation needed] The disposable diaper industry has been accused of encouraging this trend by manufacturing diapers in increasingly larger sizes. "[S]uper-comfortable diapers" have also been criticized; the advanced technology in modern diapers wick wetness away from skin, leaving the child oblivious to their accident and when they need to go to the toilet. Paediatric nurse June Rogers claims that the attitude of parents plays a major role in the problem, and that toilet training is simply not a priority for many of them.[29][30]


Like many other reviewers on here, we tried Baby Dry diapers as an alternative to Swaddlers and were sorry that we did. On a baby who is still on breast milk, the diapers resulted in feces going up their back and stomach, which soaked clothing, blankets and whatever else she happen to be touching. Our daughter's onesie was completely saturated in fecal matter, so we had to cut it off of her as to not get it on her face while trying to pull it over her head. So we lost $50 and a onesie, had to wash the bouncer, blanket, and my clothing, but we gained 276 useless diapers. It seems like you'd be better off using a handkerchief instead of Baby Dry diapers. I could only imagine the damage if she were on solid foods. Now that we're out diapers that work, we have to run to Babies-R-Us to get Swaddlers until the ones from Amazon arrive.

Free diapers may be available for low-income families with young children, household with elderly and disabled, and other struggling individuals from the Diaper Bank of Northern Indiana. They partner with local social service agencies and companies like Huggies and their Every Little Bottom Program, and diapers are distributed through many of the local non-profit agencies across Indiana. South Bend Indiana. info@diaperbankni.org
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