Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
Seventh Generation – Get a free trial of Seventh Generation diapers and wipes from Grove Collaborative. The trial kit includes a full-size pack of diapers (36 count) and a pack of travel wipes (30 count). It’s a $16.98 value! The kit is free, you just pay $4.99 shipping. Plus, they have a refer-a-friend program. Send a friend $10 and you’ll get a $10 credit too. Win-win!
To help support new and expecting moms, Target is giving away a free Welcome Kit when you set up a baby registry.  The kit includes $50+ worth of coupons and free diapers. After creating your registry, visit the Target service desk to pick up your free Welcome Kit. Items may vary by stores, but may include: Munchkin bottle, Lansinoh samples, MAM Newborn pacifier, Honest Wipes, and Diapers sample pack, Baby Bag and much more!
Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]
Baby companies give out a ton of free baby samples but only if they know you're out there and have a baby. If there's a company that makes a baby product you'd like to try, you should visit their website and register your information with them. This way when the baby companies decide to send out free baby samples, they'll automatically send one out to you.

Sometimes, a written letter or email telling a diaper company about your baby’s birth (especially if you have multiples) asking for a product to sample can result in some free diapers. I wouldn’t really recommend going the “sob story” route too strong, but companies want to know you, their customer. If you ever have faulty diapers, be sure to contact them as most have a guarantee and will replace your defective diapers for free.
All those diaper expenses add up. In its first year, a baby can go through 2,500 to 3,000 diapers, costing parents between $500 and $1,000, said Jen Dicks Burg, blogger at the The Suburban Mom and mother to three girls. BabyCenter, an online media company for parents and expectant parents, estimates that disposable diapers cost $72 per month for the first year (or $864 a year), based on a survey of more than 1,000 new moms.
Free diapers may be available for low-income families with young children, household with elderly and disabled, and other struggling individuals from the Diaper Bank of Northern Indiana. They partner with local social service agencies and companies like Huggies and their Every Little Bottom Program, and diapers are distributed through many of the local non-profit agencies across Indiana. South Bend Indiana. info@diaperbankni.org
Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
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