Do you have a favorite brand that also makes diapers? I really like the dish soap from Seventh Generation, and they also have baby diapers. Sign up for their “Generation Good” club and you might get selected to receive product samples! Start noticing the companies you use that also make diapers, and reach out to them to see if you can try a sample from them!
Give your baby the best start with a comfortable, absorbent diaper that provides up to 12 hours of protection. Cuties diapers and wipes are made with love to keep your baby’s skin soft and healthy: both have a hypoallergenic extra soft liner with natural botanicals, Vitamin E and aloe.  The diaper features a stretch waistband and nonwoven back sheet that keeps comfort a priority and the liquid resistant inner leg cuff works to prevent any leaks. The wipes use Tri-Form technology for a fabric with two outer layers to protect baby’s skin, and a durable inner layer prevents tears.

Luvs makes a much cheaper diaper and you get what you pay for. It’s a decent diaper, although not very well made. Coincidentally, Luvs and Pampers are both made by Procter & Gamble, Pampers being the premium brand and Luvs being the economy brand. If you’re on a tight budget, I would instead recommend a chlorine-free store brand, such as Target’s up & up, which runs about 13 cents per diaper.

Care for your baby's delicate skin from the very start with HUGGIES Natural Care Baby Wipes. Safe for sensitive skin, Natural Care Wipes contain 99% triple-filtered water for a pure, gentle clean. Plus, they are pH-balanced to help maintain your newborn's natural skin barrier and enriched with aloe and vitamin E to help keep skin healthy and conditioned. The #1 branded wipe*, HUGGIES Wipes are dermatologically tested and hypo-allergenic. In addition, Natural Care sensitive wipes are fragrance-free, alcohol-free and paraben-free, and they contain no phenoxyethanol or MIT. You can feel confident you're giving your baby a safe, gentle clean with every wipe. HUGGIES Natural Care moist wipes come in a wide variety of package sizes and styles, perfect for use at home and on the go: travel pack, flip-top pack, refill pack, reusable pop-up tub and the stylish Clutch 'N' Clean refillable travel pack. Don't get caught without wipes. Order online for convenient delivery right to your doorstep.

We have two kiddos and have always been loyal to Pampers diapers. We loved their super soft design and their adorable characters that we know and love. Recently that all changed. The diapers are far less soft and are prone to leakage. As soon as they are wet, the diapers smell immediately. We are so disappointed with the new design and changes recently made. Hoping Pampers will consider returning to their old quality standards so we can continue to be loyal customers. ☹️
In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]
For your other diaper changing needs, you'll find changing pads and disposable diaper bags that can have different scents. A variety of colors, sizes and styles of diaper bags can help simplify taking everything on the go. Soothe and cleanse your baby's skin with diaper rash cream, baby lotion and baby wipes. If you use cloth diapers, you can stock up on diaper liners. For different occasions and stages of development, there are training pants and swim diapers.

Amazon – You can get a FREE Baby Welcome Box worth $35 when you create a baby registry at Amazon. One of my favorite things I received was a large package of sensitive baby wipes. The contents of the box varies, but you’ll definitely get some full-size baby products and lots of samples for Mom and Baby. This offer is available for Amazon Prime members. If you’re not a member yet, get a free 30 day trial here. As a member, you’ll save 20% off diapers and wipes, 20% off household items, and get FREE 2-day shipping so it’s definitely worth a try! Make sure to request your welcome box before your free trial ends. 😉 To be eligible for the free baby box, you’ll need to create a baby registry. For complete details, click here.
An average child will go through several thousand diapers in their life.[45] Since disposable diapers are discarded after a single use, usage of disposable diapers increases the burden on landfill sites, and increased environmental awareness has led to a growth in campaigns for parents to use reusable alternatives such as cloth or hybrid diapers.[46] An estimated 27.4 billion disposable diapers are used each year in the US, resulting in a possible 3.4 million tons of used diapers adding to landfills each year.[47] A discarded disposable diaper takes up to 450 years to decompose.[48]
For more than 50 years, parents have trusted Pampers to care for their babies. Pampers is a part of The Procter & Gamble Company (NYSE:PG) and is the #1-selling diaper worldwide. Every day, more than 25 million babies in 100 countries around the world wear Pampers. Pampers offers a complete range of diapers, wipes and training pants designed to provide protection and comfort for every stage of baby’s development. Visit www.pampers.com to learn more about Pampers products, join the Pampers Rewards program, and find ideas and information to help your baby get the most out of love, sleep and play.
I have really enjoyed using Pampers diapers, along with Pampers wipes (which seem to be the only wipes that don’t bother my newborn). The diapers have a yellow line on the, which changes colors when your little one has wet the diaper. I didn’t realize how useful this was until I used honest diapers, which don’t have this feature and it made it difficult to always know if an immediate change was necessary. I have found that the fit of the diaper makes it so a blow out is less likely as well. I have noticed that the diaper can hold a lot of poop and fluid. The only other diaper brands I have used are Kirkland signature and Huggies, both of which were also fine. We will continue to use Pampers diapers because they have a high quality product and particularly the Pampers wipes, which we really like. We received some free diapers in exchange for this review, however, we had already been using the Pampers products and will continue to.
Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]
[Aside: Look, every time I throw a diaper in the trash can, I feel bad, okay? I am otherwise a very good citizen of the earth: I recycle and compost, I take mass transit every day instead of driving, I [used to] make baby food instead of buying it in the jar… but when it came to scooping poop from a diaper into the toilet, then washing a bunch of poop-stained diapers in the washing machine (for which I had to use COINS because we rented an apartment in the City), my head started to explode. I’m sorry, Mother Earth. I hope you’ll find it in your earthy heart to forgive me. I still love you.]
In the 19th century, the modern diaper began to take shape and mothers in many parts of the world used cotton material, held in place with a fastening—eventually the safety pin. Cloth diapers in the United States were first mass-produced in 1887 by Maria Allen. In the UK, nappies were made out of terry towelling, often with an inner lining made out of soft muslin.
I once calculated how much I'd spent in diapers between my children. The price was staggering. In the beginning, I bought the crunchiest disposable diapers available. After that messy lesson, I switched to a popular brand that cost nearly as much. I never really thought about what I would do if I couldn't pay for them, but where can you get free diapers for your baby? It makes sense to wonder — it cost me thousands of dollars to hold my baby's crap.
10% completion discount for Non-Prime Members and 15% Discount for Prime Members.  A completion discount is a one-time discount on select remaining items (shipped and sold by seller Amazon.com) from your registry and is available to redeem 60 days before your child’s arrival date. The discount can be used once for an order of up to $5000.00 USD (think cheap CRIB or Stroller!).
Modern cloth diapers come in a host of shapes, including preformed cloth diapers, all-in-one diapers with waterproof exteriors, fitted diaper with covers and pocket or "stuffable" diapers, which consist of a water-resistant outer shell sewn with an opening for insertion of absorbent material inserts.[22] Many design features of modern cloth diapers have followed directly from innovations initially developed in disposable diapers, such as the use of the hour glass shape, materials to separate moisture from skin and the use of double gussets, or an inner elastic band for better fit and containment of waste material.[21] Several cloth diaper brands use variations of Procter & Gamble's original 1973 patent use of a double gusset in Pampers.[13]
[Aside: Look, every time I throw a diaper in the trash can, I feel bad, okay? I am otherwise a very good citizen of the earth: I recycle and compost, I take mass transit every day instead of driving, I [used to] make baby food instead of buying it in the jar… but when it came to scooping poop from a diaper into the toilet, then washing a bunch of poop-stained diapers in the washing machine (for which I had to use COINS because we rented an apartment in the City), my head started to explode. I’m sorry, Mother Earth. I hope you’ll find it in your earthy heart to forgive me. I still love you.]
During the 1950s, companies such as Johnson and Johnson, Kendall, Parke-Davis, Playtex, and Molnlycke entered the disposable diaper market, and in 1956, Procter & Gamble began researching disposable diapers. Victor Mills, along with his project group including William Dehaas (both men who worked for the company) invented what would be trademarked "Pampers". Although Pampers were conceptualized in 1959, the diapers themselves were not launched into the market until 1961.[11] Pampers now accounts for more than $10 billion in annual revenue at Procter & Gamble.[12]
Kimberly-Clark (NYSE: KMB) and its well-known global brands are an indispensable part of life for people in more than 175 countries. Every day, nearly a quarter of the world's population trust Kimberly-Clark brands and the solutions they provide to enhance their health, hygiene and well-being. With brands such as Kleenex, Scott, Huggies, Pull-Ups, Kotex and Depend, Kimberly-Clark holds the No.1 or No. 2 share position in 80 countries. To keep up with the latest news and to learn more about the company's 145-year history of innovation, visit www.kimberly-clark.com or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
Basically these are the best diapers around. You look at them and think, “what is that mesh layer for?” Then one night, around 3 am, you discuss with your husband sending gifts to the makers of Pampers, specifically the engineers and designers who made said mesh layer. You have enough to think about as a new parent. Just buys these diapers would ya?

The baby and children section here at Walgreens.com includes supplies for feeding, clothing and bathing. You can gently wash your baby with baby wash, no tears shampoo and baby conditioner. For infants, browse bottle feeding supplies that include bottles, nipples and burp cloths. If you have older kids, there's children's nutrition options such as puddings, shakes and other drinks.
In the 19th century, the modern diaper began to take shape and mothers in many parts of the world used cotton material, held in place with a fastening—eventually the safety pin. Cloth diapers in the United States were first mass-produced in 1887 by Maria Allen. In the UK, nappies were made out of terry towelling, often with an inner lining made out of soft muslin.
Amazon ships these to us automatically which I highly recommend. Pampers are our favorite. They are very soft, well made, and can hold a LOT of pee. Our 5 month old can sleep through the night without waking up for a diaper change in these and only these diapers. The don't sag the way some of the others do. Did I mention how soft they are? I have no idea why some diapers out there are made out of the hardest crunchiest paper ever but these feel like they are made out of fabric. LOVE pampers!

Yes, Honest Company (and others) get a lot of publicity for their celebrity founders and Kardashian product placement, but generally, we are not impressed (to say the least, I’m being kind). They may be super cute, but parents frequently complain that diapers from the Honest Company and Parasol really don’t contain the elements, so to speak…which is the whole point. (Seriously, they have horror stories. And if you end up having to use twice as many diapers to prevent leakage, how much greener can they really be? Plus, who wants to be changing twice as many diapers?)
A nationwide network of clothing closets can be used. While some of them sell low cost goods, others will provide the essentials that a new, low income parent needs at no cost to them. Some struggling families may be given help for a newborn, or free diapers may be offered in an emergency. They also provide referrals. Find sources of free clothes and household items.
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