A nationwide network of clothing closets can be used. While some of them sell low cost goods, others will provide the essentials that a new, low income parent needs at no cost to them. Some struggling families may be given help for a newborn, or free diapers may be offered in an emergency. They also provide referrals. Find sources of free clothes and household items.
Baby companies give out a ton of free baby samples but only if they know you're out there and have a baby. If there's a company that makes a baby product you'd like to try, you should visit their website and register your information with them. This way when the baby companies decide to send out free baby samples, they'll automatically send one out to you.
I agree to be a Huggies Club Member. By being a member, I agree that Kimberly-Clark Singapore Pte Ltd and its parent companies and related entities ("K-C") and K-C's agents may collect, use and store all the personal data provided for marketing, survey, promotional and research purposes, including sending you information about K-C products and promotions.
There are resources available to you if you need them, though. Also, don't discount cloth diapers if you have the means to launder them. They're often easier to get at free or reduced cost, not to mention they're way better for the environment, and you can be super smug about that. (Unrelated, but once you're done diapering your baby, those diapers really make the best dusting cloths and glass cleaners.)
The first disposable diaper was invented in 1946 by Marion Donovan, a professional-turned-housewife who wanted to ensure her children's cloth diapers remained dry while they slept.[16] Donovan patented her design (called 'Boaters') in 1951. She also invented the first paper diapers, but executives did not invest in this idea and it was consequently scrapped for over ten years, until Procter & Gamble used Donovan's design ideas to create Pampers.

As of 2018, name-brand, mid-range disposable diapers in the U.S., such as Huggies and Pampers, were sold at an average cost of approximately US $0.20 to $0.30 cents each, and their manufacturers earned about two cents in profit from each diaper sold.[44] Premium brands had eco-friendly features, and sold for approximately twice that price.[44] Generic disposable diapers cost less per diaper, at an average price of $0.15 cents each, and the typical manufacturer's profit was about one cent per diaper.[44] However, the low-cost diapers needed to be changed more frequently, so the total cost savings was limited, as the lower cost per diaper was offset by the need to buy more diapers.[44]


In addition to the other two baby Registries, Babies R Us will PAY YOU 10% in reward dollars for anything purchased on your registry! WHAT?! Yes, that means you can use the money (via a gift card) to buy more items (aka get Diapers for FREE!), and remember, Babies R Us (or Toys R Us) take coupons. And, you can also use a manufacturer coupon on those diapers to get even more for your money!
In October 2008, "An updated lifecycle assessment study for disposable and reusable nappies" by the UK Environment Agency and Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs stated that reusable diapers can cause significantly less (up to 40 per cent) or significantly more damage to the environment than disposable ones, depending mostly on how parents wash and dry them. The "baseline scenario" showed that the difference in green-house emissions was insignificant (in fact, disposables even scored slightly better). However, much better results (emission cuts of up to 40 per cent) could be achieved by using reusable diapers more rationally. "The report shows that, in contrast to the use of disposable nappies, it is consumers' behaviour after purchase that determines most of the impacts from reusable nappies. Cloth nappy users can reduce their environmental impacts by:

These are the thinnest diapers I have ever seen, and we have had one or more kids in diapers for the past 5 years. Huggies has been our preferred brand as we had not had any issues.... until now. When I first opened this box of diapers I thought that Huggies had a new design. Did not give it any further thought until I checked on my 18 month old and found her diaper had leaked. Thats when I had a closer look at the new Higgies diaper and compared it to one of the same brand from an earlier box(from Costco). The new diaper in addition to the design change is lighter and thinner. I guess its time to switch to another brand.


I once calculated how much I'd spent in diapers between my children. The price was staggering. In the beginning, I bought the crunchiest disposable diapers available. After that messy lesson, I switched to a popular brand that cost nearly as much. I never really thought about what I would do if I couldn't pay for them, but where can you get free diapers for your baby? It makes sense to wonder — it cost me thousands of dollars to hold my baby's crap.

During the 1950s, companies such as Johnson and Johnson, Kendall, Parke-Davis, Playtex, and Molnlycke entered the disposable diaper market, and in 1956, Procter & Gamble began researching disposable diapers. Victor Mills, along with his project group including William Dehaas (both men who worked for the company) invented what would be trademarked "Pampers". Although Pampers were conceptualized in 1959, the diapers themselves were not launched into the market until 1961.[11] Pampers now accounts for more than $10 billion in annual revenue at Procter & Gamble.[12]


As of 2018, name-brand, mid-range disposable diapers in the U.S., such as Huggies and Pampers, were sold at an average cost of approximately US $0.20 to $0.30 cents each, and their manufacturers earned about two cents in profit from each diaper sold.[44] Premium brands had eco-friendly features, and sold for approximately twice that price.[44] Generic disposable diapers cost less per diaper, at an average price of $0.15 cents each, and the typical manufacturer's profit was about one cent per diaper.[44] However, the low-cost diapers needed to be changed more frequently, so the total cost savings was limited, as the lower cost per diaper was offset by the need to buy more diapers.[44]
Infant Crisis Services, Inc. helps families who are experiencing a crisis. They try to ensure that every toddler and baby gets access to life’s basic necessities. With the help of the members of the community, Infant Crisis Services supplies life-sustaining baby formula and food. In addition, they run a bank that provides free diapers and clothing for both toddlers and babies in times of crisis. Over 1,000 babies and toddlers get help in central Oklahoma and Oklahoma City every month. 405-528-3663
Intro: After five years and three kiddos I have used a variety of diapers including Pampers (Swaddles and Baby Dry), Huggies (Little Snugglers and Snug &Dry), Honest, Target, and Luvs. I personally only bought Honest, Target (Up&Up), Babyganics and Luvs a couple times because I didn’t like the feel (Honest diapers and Babyganics are very stiff and papery) and absorption. That being said, I had found that Pampers and Huggies had ‘premium’ (Pampers Swaddlers and Huggies Little Snugglers) and ‘regular’ (Pampers Baby Dry and Huggies Snug & Dry) classes of diapers. I have compared these four different diapers - all in my current purchasing size (Size 5).

Intraday Data provided by SIX Financial Information and subject to terms of use. Historical and current end-of-day data provided by SIX Financial Information. All quotes are in local exchange time. Real-time last sale data for U.S. stock quotes reflect trades reported through Nasdaq only. Intraday data delayed at least 15 minutes or per exchange requirements.
Seattle area residents can contact WestSide Baby for free diapers. The non-profit organization is mostly run by volunteers from the community. They currently distribute almost 300,000 diapers to the low income, unemployed, and working poor in Washington. They also partner with numerous local organizations, including more than 100 social service agencies and charities. People can not only get free diapers from the organization, but they can also get toys, clothing, and baby equipment like cribs and car seats. Call (206) 767-1662
I called Enfamil and they told me that I should receive the samples around my due date. I also called Gerber they said the only thing they will do is send out email stating samples are available and you would have to proceed through the email. I will keep a watch out for this email. Gerber also mentioned they discontinued the nutrition pack about a year ago.

If your goal is to get a trash can to conceal the smell, there are three that parents favor: the Baby Trend Diaper Champ ($34, pictured left) is an inexpensive pail that uses regular tall kitchen trash bags (yay!). Simply place the diaper in the opening, then pull the handle so it drops down into the can. So easy and best of all, no squishing a poop-filled mess through a narrow slot, like with the Diaper Genie (yuck!), although I will admit you can still smell poop with this one.
WARINING To avoid risk of choking, do not allow your child to tear the covering. Choking may result from anything children put in their mouths. Discard any torn or unsealed diaper. CAUTION: Like almost any article of clothing, disposable diapers will burn if exposed to flame. Always keep your child away from any source of flame. IMPORTANT: Shake baby soil into toilet. Wrap diaper inside its backsheet before discarding.DO NOT FLUSH DIAPER. PLEASE DO NOT LITTER. Made in the U.S.A. with domestic and imported parts.
Do you have a favorite brand that also makes diapers? I really like the dish soap from Seventh Generation, and they also have baby diapers. Sign up for their “Generation Good” club and you might get selected to receive product samples! Start noticing the companies you use that also make diapers, and reach out to them to see if you can try a sample from them!
Diapers are an essential part of a parent's life and continue to be so until their child is completely potty trained. As your child starts growing older, there are various indications that can tell you that your child is now ready to be potty trained. Let your child set his or her own pace to be potty trained while you encourage your child with positive reinforcements such as training pants.

Modern disposable baby diapers and incontinence products have a layered construction,[19] which allows the transfer and distribution of urine to an absorbent core structure where it is locked in. Basic layers are an outer shell of breathable polyethylene film or a nonwoven and film composite which prevents wetness and soil transfer, an inner absorbent layer of a mixture of air-laid paper and superabsorbent polymers for wetness, and a layer nearest the skin of nonwoven material with a distribution layer directly beneath which transfers wetness to the absorbent layer.
"Good-fitting diapers are important to the healthy growth and development of our smallest patients," said Anjanette Lee, MS, CCC/SLP, NTMTC, an infant development specialist at Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital in Houston, Texas, one of nine Level III and Level IV NICUs that tested the new diaper. "In our experience, we found Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers conformed to the baby's bottom without gapping or limiting leg movement. The thinner fasteners and less material at the waist provided a good fit for baby while still protecting their fragile skin."

Do you want free diaper samples, wipes, plus more free baby stuff? To save you time and money, I’ve created a list of 11 Free Diaper Resources below. Browse the list and click on the blue links of any offer(s) you’re interested in. You will be taken to a website to fill out a request form. Complete the form and then the manufacturer will mail the freebies to you. That’s it! 🙂
The environmental impact of cloth as compared to disposable diapers has been studied several times. In one cradle-to-grave study sponsored by the National Association of Diaper Services (NADS) and conducted by Carl Lehrburger and colleagues, results found that disposable diapers produce seven times more solid waste when discarded and three times more waste in the manufacturing process. In addition, effluents from the plastic, pulp, and paper industries are far more hazardous than those from the cotton-growing and -manufacturing processes. Single-use diapers consume less water than reusables laundered at home, but more than those sent to a commercial diaper service. Washing cloth diapers at home uses 50 to 70 gallons (approx. 189 to 264 litres) of water every three days, which is roughly equivalent to flushing the toilet 15 times a day, unless the user has a high-efficiency washing machine. An average diaper service puts its diapers through an average of 13 water changes, but uses less water and energy per diaper than one laundry load at home.[49]
Ok, these diapers are getting 3 stars because they HAVE held in what they're supposed to hold in. However, I really hate the texture of the diapers. They are "plastic-y". I LOVE the Pampers Swaddlers because they are soft, almost fabric-feeling. I bought a huge box of the Baby Dry kind because they were a few bucks cheaper, and thank God we are almost out of this box because I hate the plastic texture of the diaper. I guess that's just personal preference since they seem to perform just fine, but I prefer to have a soft little baby butt when I hold my little one, not a squishy plastic butt!
At the time the Pampers Size 6 were introduced, there was a debate between a pediatrician, T. Berry Brazelton, and syndicated columnist and best-selling author of books for parents, John Rosemond. The controversy was about the length of time a baby should wear diapers and when to start toilet training. Rosemond believes it is a "slap to the intelligence of a human being that one would allow baby to continue soiling and wetting him/herself past age 2."[20] While Rosemond concedes that Brazelton has been giving the same advice for decades, he criticized the pediatrician for serving as a consultant to Pampers, a division of Procter & Gamble, and for appearing in Pampers commercials.[21]
Ok, these diapers are getting 3 stars because they HAVE held in what they're supposed to hold in. However, I really hate the texture of the diapers. They are "plastic-y". I LOVE the Pampers Swaddlers because they are soft, almost fabric-feeling. I bought a huge box of the Baby Dry kind because they were a few bucks cheaper, and thank God we are almost out of this box because I hate the plastic texture of the diaper. I guess that's just personal preference since they seem to perform just fine, but I prefer to have a soft little baby butt when I hold my little one, not a squishy plastic butt!
Wrap your baby in Pampers Swaddlers diapers, our most trusted comfort and protection and the #1 Choice of US Hospitals.* Our Blankie Soft diaper with a unique Absorb Away Liner pulls wetness and mess away from baby's skin to help keep your baby comfortable. It also has a color-changing wetness indicator that tells you when your baby might need a change. Finally, we make sure your baby's delicate belly is protected with the contoured umbilical notch.**

*Based on sales of the newborn hospital diaper. **Available in sizes NB-2.

The age at which children should cease regularly wearing diapers and toilet training should begin is a subject of debate. Proponents of baby-led potty training and Elimination Communication argue that potty training can begin at birth with multiple benefits, with diapers only used as a back up. Keeping children in diapers beyond infancy can be controversial, with family psychologist John Rosemond claiming it is a "slap to the intelligence of a human being that one would allow baby to continue soiling and wetting himself past age two."[26] Pediatrician T. Berry Brazelton, however, believes that toilet training is the child's choice and has encouraged this view in various commercials for Pampers Size 6, a diaper for older children.[26] Brazelton warns that enforced toilet training can cause serious longterm problems, and that it is the child's decision when to stop wearing diapers, not the parents'.[26][27]

“At the Diaper Bank of Central Arizona, we collect money, diapers, and wipes from the public and then we partner with around 30 non-profits around the Phoenix metro area whom we give our diapers to. They then go on to hand those diapers out in one of two ways. 1.) Our partners give out emergency supplies of diapers that last usually around 2 days. 2.) Other agencies we work with take on families as part of their normal case management, and they provide diapers for a longer period of time so long as that family is in their program.”


In the hospital, Pampers Swaddlers will (probably) be the first diaper to hit your baby’s bottom. I am very happy with the performance of Pampers; they are soft, fit well, and contain leaks. Pampers Swaddlers are incredibly soft and have an umbilical cord notch for newbies. They also have a line that changes color to indicate wetness (Swaddlers also come in a Sensitive version).
Luvs makes a much cheaper diaper and you get what you pay for. It’s a decent diaper, although not very well made. Coincidentally, Luvs and Pampers are both made by Procter & Gamble, Pampers being the premium brand and Luvs being the economy brand. If you’re on a tight budget, I would instead recommend a chlorine-free store brand, such as Target’s up & up, which runs about 13 cents per diaper.
For the design-conscious, an awesome yet pricier diaper pail is the Ubbi Steel Diaper Pail (right). At $69, this sleek diaper pail comes in dozens of different colors, is made of odor-blocking steel, AND doesn’t require special bags–  it’s the top selling diaper pail on Amazon. If you have the money, the Ubbi is as good as it gets. And really? This is a worthwhile place to spend a little extra. If you have more than one kid, you could be using this for years.
I have really enjoyed using Pampers diapers, along with Pampers wipes (which seem to be the only wipes that don’t bother my newborn). The diapers have a yellow line on the, which changes colors when your little one has wet the diaper. I didn’t realize how useful this was until I used honest diapers, which don’t have this feature and it made it difficult to always know if an immediate change was necessary. I have found that the fit of the diaper makes it so a blow out is less likely as well. I have noticed that the diaper can hold a lot of poop and fluid. The only other diaper brands I have used are Kirkland signature and Huggies, both of which were also fine. We will continue to use Pampers diapers because they have a high quality product and particularly the Pampers wipes, which we really like. We received some free diapers in exchange for this review, however, we had already been using the Pampers products and will continue to.
If you’re spending that much, and you’re in the market for something with a few more bells and whistles, I also like the Hatch Baby Grow ($129), an integrated baby scale and changing pad in one. The scale allows you to track weight gain, milk intake and other such things that are typically only ascertained by a visit to a pediatrician’s office. I would especially recommend this for parents who are the “need to know” type (those who like to have lots of data) or if you have any reason to expect a preemie (you are pregnant with multiples, high risk, etc.).

DO NOT BUY THESE! These are not the same Huggies I've used for years. We went up a size and these ones are paper thin, cut oddly and there are hard clumps of dried powder of some sort and they don't bend. I'm attaching a photo to the clump. They are in different parts of each diaper. These seem like knock off Huggies. And Amazon will NOT let me return them. I'm sending a letter to Huggies.
Usually I don't like store brand diapers I've been accustomed to buying huggies, pampers, or sometimes luvs. On occasion when there's sales or I'm on the go and on my last diaper I've tried a few store brands that were horrible quality. Thanks to this sample I now know that walgreens well beginnings diapers are awesome, I will definitely keep purchasing these!
I called gerber today and they don’t send out the bags or do the nutrition kits. I called inquiring explaining I’m doing a home birth so instead there gonna send a pregnancy kit but that’s it. Enfamil is making the exception to send me the diaper bag they do for the hospitals since I’m having a home birth. Still have to call similac their closed so have to wait til Monday.
The PENNY HOARDER℠, ℠, and  ℠ are service marks of Taylor Media Corp. Other marks contained on this website are the property of their respective owners. Taylor Media Corp. is not licensed by or affiliated with any third-party marks on its website and they do not endorse, authorize, or sponsor our content except as noted herein. Please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.
×