BEWARE!!! Just because the box looks like Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max Diapers, these are NOT the same. My son is now 5 mo. old and we've been using Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max diapers since he was born (you know, with the blue wetness indicator on the front). However, these are NOT Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max. These are thinner, do not have the woven material inside the diaper and are not nearly as absorbent as the Swaddlers. My son has leaked out of his diaper the last 5 nights... these diapers simply are not absorbent enough to contain a night's worth of pee. We rarely had this problem with Dry Max. I won't be buying these again- they simply aren't worth the very little cost savings.
We have two kiddos and have always been loyal to Pampers diapers. We loved their super soft design and their adorable characters that we know and love. Recently that all changed. The diapers are far less soft and are prone to leakage. As soon as they are wet, the diapers smell immediately. We are so disappointed with the new design and changes recently made. Hoping Pampers will consider returning to their old quality standards so we can continue to be loyal customers. ☹️

In the 20th century, the disposable diaper was conceived. In the 1930s, Robinsons of Chesterfield had what were labeled "Destroyable Babies Napkins" listed in their catalogue for the wholesale market.[5] In 1944, Hugo Drangel of the Swedish paper company Pauliström suggested a conceptual design which would entail the placing of sheets of paper tissue (cellulose wadding) inside the cloth diaper and rubber pants. However, cellulose wadding was rough against the skin and crumbled into balls when exposed to moisture.
Wrap your baby in Pampers Swaddlers diapers, the most trusted comfort and protection and the #1 Choice of US Hospitals. The Blankie Soft diaper with a unique Absorb Away Liner pulls wetness and mess away from baby's skin to help keep your baby comfortable. It also has a color-changing wetness indicator that tells you when your baby might need a change.
In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]
When I was expecting my first child, someone gave me a huge supply of diapers at my baby shower. I thought it was nice, but it also wasn't the giant stuffed giraffe I thought I "needed" for the nursery. Diapers were... practical. Fast-forward to now, when I have not one, but two kids, in diapers and I want to go back and kiss the feet of that mama who had the foresight to get me diapers. Diapers are expensive AF. So for everyone wondering how to get free diapers, here are some helpful pointers.
Modern cloth diapers come in a host of shapes, including preformed cloth diapers, all-in-one diapers with waterproof exteriors, fitted diaper with covers and pocket or "stuffable" diapers, which consist of a water-resistant outer shell sewn with an opening for insertion of absorbent material inserts.[22] Many design features of modern cloth diapers have followed directly from innovations initially developed in disposable diapers, such as the use of the hour glass shape, materials to separate moisture from skin and the use of double gussets, or an inner elastic band for better fit and containment of waste material.[21] Several cloth diaper brands use variations of Procter & Gamble's original 1973 patent use of a double gusset in Pampers.[13]
This diaper is very economical and does what it needs to do. It doesn't have the wetness indicator but you can feel or smell for yourself if the diaper is wet. Because of its thinness, you can also see clearly when your baby poops. I prefer the diapers with the wetness indicator. This one does what it needs to do; there's nothing fancy about it. If your baby has a sensitive bottom, though, I would recommend using another type of diaper. There's a reason this one is cheaper than the others.
Intro: After five years and three kiddos I have used a variety of diapers including Pampers (Swaddles and Baby Dry), Huggies (Little Snugglers and Snug &Dry), Honest, Target, and Luvs. I personally only bought Honest, Target (Up&Up), Babyganics and Luvs a couple times because I didn’t like the feel (Honest diapers and Babyganics are very stiff and papery) and absorption. That being said, I had found that Pampers and Huggies had ‘premium’ (Pampers Swaddlers and Huggies Little Snugglers) and ‘regular’ (Pampers Baby Dry and Huggies Snug & Dry) classes of diapers. I have compared these four different diapers - all in my current purchasing size (Size 5).
We got these diapers because the price was unbeatable with the Amazon Mom subscription. We cloth diaper but use disposables at night and on long outings. These diapers have been great on her little bum and can get her through a six or seven hour stretch no problem. They do smell though- its a baby powder scent that's a bit on the chemical side. We've gotten used to it.
If you buy Huggies or Pampers diapers, both of them offer rewards for entering codes found on packages, or special promo codes you find online. You can also earn points for doing other things like watching their videos, leaving reviews, or reading their articles. Your points can add up over time and equal coupons for free diapers (or other rewards). Signup for Pampers Rewards HERE and/or the Huggies Rewards HERE.
Nice old, soft bits of good Turkish towelling, properly washed, will make the softest of diaper coverings, inside which specially absorbent napkins (diapers), see below at 1A, soft, light, and easily washed, are contained. These should rarely be soiled once regular habits have been inculcated, especially during the night period in which it is most important to prevent habit formation
Sometimes, a written letter or email telling a diaper company about your baby’s birth (especially if you have multiples) asking for a product to sample can result in some free diapers. I wouldn’t really recommend going the “sob story” route too strong, but companies want to know you, their customer. If you ever have faulty diapers, be sure to contact them as most have a guarantee and will replace your defective diapers for free.
In the 20th century, the disposable diaper was conceived. In the 1930s, Robinsons of Chesterfield had what were labeled "Destroyable Babies Napkins" listed in their catalogue for the wholesale market.[5] In 1944, Hugo Drangel of the Swedish paper company Pauliström suggested a conceptual design which would entail the placing of sheets of paper tissue (cellulose wadding) inside the cloth diaper and rubber pants. However, cellulose wadding was rough against the skin and crumbled into balls when exposed to moisture.
To help support new and expecting moms, Target is giving away a free Welcome Kit when you set up a baby registry.  The kit includes $50+ worth of coupons and free diapers. After creating your registry, visit the Target service desk to pick up your free Welcome Kit. Items may vary by stores, but may include: Munchkin bottle, Lansinoh samples, MAM Newborn pacifier, Honest Wipes, and Diapers sample pack, Baby Bag and much more!

As a first time mom it was pretty overwhelming having to decide on what to use for my baby. Everything including baby wash, lotion, laundry detergent, wipes, and diapers come in so many varieties I didn’t know where to start. I was lucky enough to receive sample diapers from about 5 different brands including Pampers Swaddlers. These are the only diapers that never let me down. Super soft, no leaks, ultra absorbent, great fit. Without giving TMI, there have been many moments where I was surprised by how much they contained. And without leaks! I also have peace of mind knowing that my baby can stay in his diaper all night if necessary without any worry of leaks or discomfort. It was also a very smooth transition into bigger sizes. We started off with newborn, then into size 1 and now size 2. When we’re done with our current box then we will most likely purchase size 3 for our 3 1/2 month old baby. I just really love how reliable the Pampers Swaddlers are and intend on using these the entire time our baby’s in diapers.


As a first time mom, I started off using the brand given to me in the hospital, but quickly noticed it was irritating my newborns skin.. i tried some other brands with no succwss until tried huggies and i will never go back, they are super absorbant and soft inside for comfort. I have some pregnant friends and make sure to tell everyone how great huggies are!! The snug and dry are the best diapers ive ever used! 10 out of 10.

The Atlanta Community Food Bank provides free diapers in partnership with local charities and national businesses such as Pampers and Huggies Every Little Bottom Program assistance. Many of the cloth or disposable diapers distributed are available to low income because the box may have been damaged by the retailer, but the products themselves are in great condition. Some may refer to them as salvaged. Atlanta Georgia (404) 892-3333.
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