Diapers are primarily worn by infants, toddlers who are not yet potty trained, and by children who experience bedwetting. They are also used by adults with incontinence, in certain circumstances where access to a toilet is unavailable or for psychological reasons. These can include those of advanced age, patients bed-bound in a hospital, individuals with certain types of physical or mental disability, diaper fetishists, and people working in extreme conditions, such as astronauts. It is not uncommon for people to wear diapers under dry suits.
Luvs makes a much cheaper diaper and you get what you pay for. It’s a decent diaper, although not very well made. Coincidentally, Luvs and Pampers are both made by Procter & Gamble, Pampers being the premium brand and Luvs being the economy brand. If you’re on a tight budget, I would instead recommend a chlorine-free store brand, such as Target’s up & up, which runs about 13 cents per diaper.
"Good-fitting diapers are important to the healthy growth and development of our smallest patients," said Anjanette Lee, MS, CCC/SLP, NTMTC, an infant development specialist at Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital in Houston, Texas, one of nine Level III and Level IV NICUs that tested the new diaper. "In our experience, we found Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers conformed to the baby's bottom without gapping or limiting leg movement. The thinner fasteners and less material at the waist provided a good fit for baby while still protecting their fragile skin."

Another aspect to consider when choosing between disposable diapers and cloth diapers is cost. It is estimated that an average baby will use from $1,500 to $2,000 or more in disposable diapers before being potty-trained.[54] In contrast, cloth diapers, while initially more expensive than disposables, cost as low as $300 for a basic set of cloth diapers, although costs can rise with more expensive options.[55][56] The cost of washing and drying diapers must also be considered. The basic set, if one-sized, can last from birth to potty-training.

Of course, diapers are just one of the many expenses parents incur by raising a child; parents can spend up to $24,000 in the first year alone. Subscription services for diapers can seem convenient, but aren’t the most economical, Burg added. “Those who coupon and deal hunt are able to significantly reduce that number, but that takes dedication,” she said.
Wrap your baby in Pampers Swaddlers diapers, our most trusted comfort and protection and the #1 choice of US hospitals.* Our Blankie Soft™ diaper with a unique Absorb Away Liner™ pulls wetness and mess away from baby's skin to help keep your baby comfortable. It also has a color-changing wetness indicator that tells you when your baby might need a change. And we make sure your baby's delicate belly is protected with the contoured umbilical notch.**
WARINING To avoid risk of choking, do not allow your child to tear the covering. Choking may result from anything children put in their mouths. Discard any torn or unsealed diaper. CAUTION: Like almost any article of clothing, disposable diapers will burn if exposed to flame. Always keep your child away from any source of flame. IMPORTANT: Shake baby soil into toilet. Wrap diaper inside its backsheet before discarding.DO NOT FLUSH DIAPER. PLEASE DO NOT LITTER. Made in the U.S.A. with domestic and imported parts.
Pampers Diapers and Huggies have a rewards program. They have unique one time use codes found inside the packages of diapers and some wipes. Save those and enter them on their websites (after making an account-when you sign up for pampers you will get 100 pts) When you have a certain amount of points, you can cash in for Free rewards. There are a ton of different items, and they change them too. When I reached 1,000 points I cashed out for a Dora Potty Seat for my youngest! Yay!
All those diaper expenses add up. In its first year, a baby can go through 2,500 to 3,000 diapers, costing parents between $500 and $1,000, said Jen Dicks Burg, blogger at the The Suburban Mom and mother to three girls. BabyCenter, an online media company for parents and expectant parents, estimates that disposable diapers cost $72 per month for the first year (or $864 a year), based on a survey of more than 1,000 new moms.
Wool pants, or, once available, rubber pants, were sometimes used over the cloth diaper to prevent leakage. Doctors believed that rubber pants were harmful because they thought the rubber acted as a poultice and damaged the skin of infants.[citation needed] The constant problem to be overcome was diaper rash, and the infection thereof. The concern was that lack of air circulation would worsen this condition. While lack of air circulation is a factor, it was later found that poor hygiene involving inefficiently washed diapers and infrequent changes of diapers, along with allowing the baby to lie for prolonged periods of time with fecal matter in contact with the skin, were the two main causes of these problems.[citation needed]

DO NOT BUY THESE! These are not the same Huggies I've used for years. We went up a size and these ones are paper thin, cut oddly and there are hard clumps of dried powder of some sort and they don't bend. I'm attaching a photo to the clump. They are in different parts of each diaper. These seem like knock off Huggies. And Amazon will NOT let me return them. I'm sending a letter to Huggies.
The only thing you get is some coupons and sample packs of infant formula from enfamil. Oh, and a bunch of spam emails from the companies they sell your email address too. Not worth the hundreds of questions you have to answer and other offers you have to sign up for. Your hospital will give you a bag with a can of formula and sometimes coupons from some companies they use (Johnson and Johnson) and that’s about it. When I had my daughter in December all I got was a bag and my nurses were wonderful and gave us extra diapers, wipes, wash and lotion but it came from the hospitals stash and nothing that Gerber gives to them to give each new mom like they did in 20012 and 2005 when I had my other kids.
In the 20th century, the disposable diaper was conceived. In the 1930s, Robinsons of Chesterfield had what were labeled "Destroyable Babies Napkins" listed in their catalogue for the wholesale market.[5] In 1944, Hugo Drangel of the Swedish paper company Pauliström suggested a conceptual design which would entail the placing of sheets of paper tissue (cellulose wadding) inside the cloth diaper and rubber pants. However, cellulose wadding was rough against the skin and crumbled into balls when exposed to moisture.

Never underestimate the love and charity of your family and friends. Some friends have diapers their child outgrew too fast and have stowed away in their closet, begging to be used to assist you. Your parents may be willing to set up a subscribe and save subscription for you through Amazon and pay for your diapers monthly as a little gift for you. Or they may love buying diapers for you from a store. You never know unless you ask.

I once calculated how much I'd spent in diapers between my children. The price was staggering. In the beginning, I bought the crunchiest disposable diapers available. After that messy lesson, I switched to a popular brand that cost nearly as much. I never really thought about what I would do if I couldn't pay for them, but where can you get free diapers for your baby? It makes sense to wonder — it cost me thousands of dollars to hold my baby's crap.
The early 1990s also saw the introduction of gender-specific diapers in the Pampers brand; the product returned to unisex diapers towards the end of the decade. In 1993, Pampers introduced training pants, but the Pampers Trainers were a short lived product. Pampers did not sell training pants again until the introduction of Easy Up.[3] In 1996, P&G acquired Baby Fresh wipes from Kimberly-Clark; Kimberly-Clark had recently acquired Baby Fresh owner Scott Paper Company and was ordered to sell the wipes business.[4] In 1998, Procter & Gamble introduced its largest diaper at the time, Pampers Baby-Dry Size 6. It was promoted in an advertising campaign featuring pediatrician and child development expert Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, who said to let the child decide when the time is right to potty train. The size 6 diapers were billed for growing toddlers. Huggies also introduced a size 6 diaper at this time.[5]
Children may have problems with bladder control (primarily at night), until eight years or older, and may wear diapers while sleeping to control bedwetting.[31] The Children's Health and Wellness website claims that diapering a child can prolong bedwetting, as it sends a "message of permission" to urinate in their sleep.[32] Dr Anthony Page of the Creative Child Online Magazine claims that children can get used to their diapers and begin to view them as a comfort, and that of the children surveyed, most would rather wear diapers than worry about getting up at night to go to the toilet.[33] In a series of online surveys, Robert A Pretlow, MD, of eHealth International, Inc., cites an identical figure. He argues that if Internet users are representative of society as a whole, these surveys imply that a fetishistic or emotional attraction to diapers may be responsible for these "comfort" cases, and that "these behaviors are a significant cause of enuresis and incontinence." He called for further studies to be done on the topic.[34]
I once calculated how much I'd spent in diapers between my children. The price was staggering. In the beginning, I bought the crunchiest disposable diapers available. After that messy lesson, I switched to a popular brand that cost nearly as much. I never really thought about what I would do if I couldn't pay for them, but where can you get free diapers for your baby? It makes sense to wonder — it cost me thousands of dollars to hold my baby's crap.
Wrap your baby in Pampers Swaddlers diapers, our most trusted comfort and protection and the #1 choice of US hospitals.* Our Blankie Soft™ diaper with a unique Absorb Away Liner™ pulls wetness and mess away from baby's skin to help keep your baby comfortable. It also has a color-changing wetness indicator that tells you when your baby might need a change. And we make sure your baby's delicate belly is protected with the contoured umbilical notch.**

Another favorite is the Munchkin Step Diaper Pail ($64), which wins the odor control contest. This pail requires special bags and uses a baking soda dispenser (which you also have to refill) to control odor. It does require a bit of diaper-squishing, but not nearly as much as the Diaper Genie. If odor control is a top priority and you don’t mind buying special bags, this is your go-to.


Note: The pricing here isn’t static: these are the approximate costs for size 1 diapers bought in bulk (and even those are liable to change frequently online). As you go up in sizing (to size 2, 3, etc.), the price per diaper will increase. And, like anything else, the more you buy, the cheaper diapers are. Thus, buying in bulk saves a fair amount. More on sizing and pricing in a minute….

Infant Crisis Services, Inc. helps families who are experiencing a crisis. They try to ensure that every toddler and baby gets access to life’s basic necessities. With the help of the members of the community, Infant Crisis Services supplies life-sustaining baby formula and food. In addition, they run a bank that provides free diapers and clothing for both toddlers and babies in times of crisis. Over 1,000 babies and toddlers get help in central Oklahoma and Oklahoma City every month. 405-528-3663
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