Intraday Data provided by SIX Financial Information and subject to terms of use. Historical and current end-of-day data provided by SIX Financial Information. All quotes are in local exchange time. Real-time last sale data for U.S. stock quotes reflect trades reported through Nasdaq only. Intraday data delayed at least 15 minutes or per exchange requirements.
The early 1990s also saw the introduction of gender-specific diapers in the Pampers brand; the product returned to unisex diapers towards the end of the decade. In 1993, Pampers introduced training pants, but the Pampers Trainers were a short lived product. Pampers did not sell training pants again until the introduction of Easy Up.[3] In 1996, P&G acquired Baby Fresh wipes from Kimberly-Clark; Kimberly-Clark had recently acquired Baby Fresh owner Scott Paper Company and was ordered to sell the wipes business.[4] In 1998, Procter & Gamble introduced its largest diaper at the time, Pampers Baby-Dry Size 6. It was promoted in an advertising campaign featuring pediatrician and child development expert Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, who said to let the child decide when the time is right to potty train. The size 6 diapers were billed for growing toddlers. Huggies also introduced a size 6 diaper at this time.[5]
Sometimes, a written letter or email telling a diaper company about your baby’s birth (especially if you have multiples) asking for a product to sample can result in some free diapers. I wouldn’t really recommend going the “sob story” route too strong, but companies want to know you, their customer. If you ever have faulty diapers, be sure to contact them as most have a guarantee and will replace your defective diapers for free.
This diaper is very economical and does what it needs to do. It doesn't have the wetness indicator but you can feel or smell for yourself if the diaper is wet. Because of its thinness, you can also see clearly when your baby poops. I prefer the diapers with the wetness indicator. This one does what it needs to do; there's nothing fancy about it. If your baby has a sensitive bottom, though, I would recommend using another type of diaper. There's a reason this one is cheaper than the others.

If you can’t afford diapers right now, then I want to mention that there are loads of places that give out FREE Diapers to those in need. They are called “Diaper Banks” and they are on a mission to make up for the diaper “gap” in order for every baby to have clean diapers. If you have extra diapers, BabyCycle in St. Pete and HereWeGrow in Dunedin are both in desperate need of your diapers.


Huggies Rewards follows the same model — download the app, earn points (here, you do get 500 just for signing up), and then shop the Huggies rewards marketplace. Again, it requires a heck of a lot of diaper purchases to accumulate enough points to get a free pack, but Huggies does offer additional ways to earn points — like participating in surveys, sharing on social media, and reading articles.

[Aside: Look, every time I throw a diaper in the trash can, I feel bad, okay? I am otherwise a very good citizen of the earth: I recycle and compost, I take mass transit every day instead of driving, I [used to] make baby food instead of buying it in the jar… but when it came to scooping poop from a diaper into the toilet, then washing a bunch of poop-stained diapers in the washing machine (for which I had to use COINS because we rented an apartment in the City), my head started to explode. I’m sorry, Mother Earth. I hope you’ll find it in your earthy heart to forgive me. I still love you.]
If your goal is to get a trash can to conceal the smell, there are three that parents favor: the Baby Trend Diaper Champ ($34, pictured left) is an inexpensive pail that uses regular tall kitchen trash bags (yay!). Simply place the diaper in the opening, then pull the handle so it drops down into the can. So easy and best of all, no squishing a poop-filled mess through a narrow slot, like with the Diaper Genie (yuck!), although I will admit you can still smell poop with this one.

DALLAS, Feb. 1, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Huggies, the fastest growing diaper brand in U.S. hospitals, is launching a new diaper for the smallest babies – Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers. These diapers are made explicitly for babies weighing less than two pounds (900 grams), and specially-designed to protect the delicate skin of premature babies, while promoting healthy growth and development. The new diaper is part of No Baby Unhugged, Huggies promise to ensure babies get the hugs they need to thrive. 

Medical institutions such as the doctor’s offices and hospitals frequently get free samples of diapers from manufacturers to distribute to patients. Since those samples are usually samples of new products, there is no guarantee of what types or sizes are available, but if you call local doctors and hospitals in your area, you can find out what’s currently available.
The only thing you get is some coupons and sample packs of infant formula from enfamil. Oh, and a bunch of spam emails from the companies they sell your email address too. Not worth the hundreds of questions you have to answer and other offers you have to sign up for. Your hospital will give you a bag with a can of formula and sometimes coupons from some companies they use (Johnson and Johnson) and that’s about it. When I had my daughter in December all I got was a bag and my nurses were wonderful and gave us extra diapers, wipes, wash and lotion but it came from the hospitals stash and nothing that Gerber gives to them to give each new mom like they did in 20012 and 2005 when I had my other kids.
In the 20th century, the disposable diaper was conceived. In the 1930s, Robinsons of Chesterfield had what were labeled "Destroyable Babies Napkins" listed in their catalogue for the wholesale market.[5] In 1944, Hugo Drangel of the Swedish paper company Pauliström suggested a conceptual design which would entail the placing of sheets of paper tissue (cellulose wadding) inside the cloth diaper and rubber pants. However, cellulose wadding was rough against the skin and crumbled into balls when exposed to moisture.
We got these diapers because the price was unbeatable with the Amazon Mom subscription. We cloth diaper but use disposables at night and on long outings. These diapers have been great on her little bum and can get her through a six or seven hour stretch no problem. They do smell though- its a baby powder scent that's a bit on the chemical side. We've gotten used to it.
We got these diapers because the price was unbeatable with the Amazon Mom subscription. We cloth diaper but use disposables at night and on long outings. These diapers have been great on her little bum and can get her through a six or seven hour stretch no problem. They do smell though- its a baby powder scent that's a bit on the chemical side. We've gotten used to it.
The early 1990s also saw the introduction of gender-specific diapers in the Pampers brand; the product returned to unisex diapers towards the end of the decade. In 1993, Pampers introduced training pants, but the Pampers Trainers were a short lived product. Pampers did not sell training pants again until the introduction of Easy Up.[3] In 1996, P&G acquired Baby Fresh wipes from Kimberly-Clark; Kimberly-Clark had recently acquired Baby Fresh owner Scott Paper Company and was ordered to sell the wipes business.[4] In 1998, Procter & Gamble introduced its largest diaper at the time, Pampers Baby-Dry Size 6. It was promoted in an advertising campaign featuring pediatrician and child development expert Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, who said to let the child decide when the time is right to potty train. The size 6 diapers were billed for growing toddlers. Huggies also introduced a size 6 diaper at this time.[5]
HUGGIES Size Two Snug & Dry Diapers give your baby great protection at a great value. Four layers of protection absorb moisture quickly to help stop leaks for up to 12 hours, and a quilted liner helps to keep your baby dry and comfortable. Plus, Snug & Dry disposable baby diapers have a wetness indicator stripe on the outside that changes from yellow to blue when wet, which helps take the guesswork out of diaper changes. Featuring fun Disney Mickey Mouse designs, Snug & Dry Diapers are available in sizes Newborn (up to 10 lb.), 1 (8-14 lb.), 2 (12-18 lb.), 3 (16-28 lb.), 4 (22-37 lb.), 5 (27+ lb.) and 6 (35+ lb.). Join HUGGIES Rewards to earn points on every pack of HUGGIES diapers and wipes you buy.
The first disposable diaper was invented in 1946 by Marion Donovan, a professional-turned-housewife who wanted to ensure her children's cloth diapers remained dry while they slept.[16] Donovan patented her design (called 'Boaters') in 1951. She also invented the first paper diapers, but executives did not invest in this idea and it was consequently scrapped for over ten years, until Procter & Gamble used Donovan's design ideas to create Pampers.

Otherwise, another great option to save money on diapers is signing up for Amazon Family. You have to become an Amazon Prime Member (which means paying $99/year, however you can Try Amazon Prime with their 30-Day Free Trial first!) but you will get free two-day shipping on millions of items and unlimited music and video streaming along with your awesome diaper savings of 20% off diaper subscriptions! Plus, you can get a 15% Amazon Baby Registry completion discount. The diaper boxes from Amazon are also bigger and will cost less per diaper often than your local stores, plus you won’t have to spend gas to go pick it up!
These are my favorite diapers and a favorite among eco-moms. They are hypoallergenic, chlorine-free, affordable, and perform exceptionally well. IMO, these diapers are the best combo of eco-friendly and absorbent. All of that, and they cost about the same as Pampers or Huggies. Some users say they run smaller than these mainstream brands, just FYI.
Sometimes, a written letter or email telling a diaper company about your baby’s birth (especially if you have multiples) asking for a product to sample can result in some free diapers. I wouldn’t really recommend going the “sob story” route too strong, but companies want to know you, their customer. If you ever have faulty diapers, be sure to contact them as most have a guarantee and will replace your defective diapers for free.
Like many other reviewers on here, we tried Baby Dry diapers as an alternative to Swaddlers and were sorry that we did. On a baby who is still on breast milk, the diapers resulted in feces going up their back and stomach, which soaked clothing, blankets and whatever else she happen to be touching. Our daughter's onesie was completely saturated in fecal matter, so we had to cut it off of her as to not get it on her face while trying to pull it over her head. So we lost $50 and a onesie, had to wash the bouncer, blanket, and my clothing, but we gained 276 useless diapers. It seems like you'd be better off using a handkerchief instead of Baby Dry diapers. I could only imagine the damage if she were on solid foods. Now that we're out diapers that work, we have to run to Babies-R-Us to get Swaddlers until the ones from Amazon arrive.
As parents ourselves, we can vividly remember the feelings of fear, anxiousness, and excitement that come along with the first little bundle of joy! Knowing that we've been able to offer a trustworthy diapers that have worked wonderfully for your family brings us so much joy, and we want to thank you for sharing this with us. Our number is (800)726-7377, reach out to us any time if you ever have any questions!

This diaper is very economical and does what it needs to do. It doesn't have the wetness indicator but you can feel or smell for yourself if the diaper is wet. Because of its thinness, you can also see clearly when your baby poops. I prefer the diapers with the wetness indicator. This one does what it needs to do; there's nothing fancy about it. If your baby has a sensitive bottom, though, I would recommend using another type of diaper. There's a reason this one is cheaper than the others.
I noticed something different about these diapers, 1. was the character print which I liked. 2. was the quilted pattern on the inside of the diaper and 3. the blue strip liner. I also unfortunately noticed that these diapers consistently leaked at night. I at first thought that I hadn't pulled the side tabs snug enough but after having my baby waking up wet night after night I knew it was not user error but that these diapers suck. These diapers may absorb more but they leak out some of the moisture that they've absorbed. I have some of the older version of snug and dry left over that I use at night but these "new" version I will only use during the day. I also noticed that these new diapers cause itchiness on my sons private parts I have to apply a bit more diaper cream to prevent him from having irritation. I don't like these new diapers and wish I could get some sort of refund otherwise I may have to switch back to using pampers. They cost a tad bit more but pampers in this case is a better product. I have Huggies on amazon prime auto-shipment but will stop any future shipment.
First Coast Women's Services. The mailing address is 11215 San Jose Boulevard, Jacksonville, Florida 32223. The non-profit supports lower income women in Duval County. Diapers, referrals, and other aid is provided to those that qualify. Call (904) 262-6300, or try another non-profit known as Emergency Pregnancy Services at (904) 308-7510. More diaper programs in Duval County.
×