WETNES INDICATOR: These both have the wetness indicator line (shown in yellow) which turn blue when the diaper is wet. This is not a necessary diaper function, but can be slightly helpful when doing a quick diaper check. Although, the line tends to almost immediately turn blue once the diaper is applied - but not necessarily enough to change the diaper.
Another favorite is the Munchkin Step Diaper Pail ($64), which wins the odor control contest. This pail requires special bags and uses a baking soda dispenser (which you also have to refill) to control odor. It does require a bit of diaper-squishing, but not nearly as much as the Diaper Genie. If odor control is a top priority and you don’t mind buying special bags, this is your go-to.
Did you know that when you sign up for a free magazine it puts your name on a list that says that you probably have young children? And you know who would like to send you promotional items (and maybe coupons) because you have small children? Diaper companies! Diaper companies buy marketing lists so that they can send you advertisements to win you over. Plus, lots of times the FREE Magazine Subscriptions I receive come with bonus coupons inside! Randomly I will see Huggies, Pampers or Luvs coupons.
HUGGIES Size Two Snug & Dry Diapers give your baby great protection at a great value. Four layers of protection absorb moisture quickly to help stop leaks for up to 12 hours, and a quilted liner helps to keep your baby dry and comfortable. Plus, Snug & Dry disposable baby diapers have a wetness indicator stripe on the outside that changes from yellow to blue when wet, which helps take the guesswork out of diaper changes. Featuring fun Disney Mickey Mouse designs, Snug & Dry Diapers are available in sizes Newborn (up to 10 lb.), 1 (8-14 lb.), 2 (12-18 lb.), 3 (16-28 lb.), 4 (22-37 lb.), 5 (27+ lb.) and 6 (35+ lb.). Join HUGGIES Rewards to earn points on every pack of HUGGIES diapers and wipes you buy.
Give your baby the best start with a comfortable, absorbent diaper that provides up to 12 hours of protection. Cuties diapers and wipes are made with love to keep your baby’s skin soft and healthy: both have a hypoallergenic extra soft liner with natural botanicals, Vitamin E and aloe.  The diaper features a stretch waistband and nonwoven back sheet that keeps comfort a priority and the liquid resistant inner leg cuff works to prevent any leaks. The wipes use Tri-Form technology for a fabric with two outer layers to protect baby’s skin, and a durable inner layer prevents tears.
There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
Most hospitals will not give diaper bags anymore. I just had my little girl 3 weeks ago and nothing and my Sil just had her baby in California and didn’t get one. I did call.similac and enfamil because my daughter has been throwing up alot and they’re both sending me diaper bags and.separate formula samples for upset tummies. It’s best to call them and ask for the Diaper bags.especially if your hospital does not participate because they’re baby friendly breast feeding hospitals.a
In the 20th century, the disposable diaper was conceived. In the 1930s, Robinsons of Chesterfield had what were labeled "Destroyable Babies Napkins" listed in their catalogue for the wholesale market.[5] In 1944, Hugo Drangel of the Swedish paper company Pauliström suggested a conceptual design which would entail the placing of sheets of paper tissue (cellulose wadding) inside the cloth diaper and rubber pants. However, cellulose wadding was rough against the skin and crumbled into balls when exposed to moisture.
In addition to the other two baby Registries, Babies R Us will PAY YOU 10% in reward dollars for anything purchased on your registry! WHAT?! Yes, that means you can use the money (via a gift card) to buy more items (aka get Diapers for FREE!), and remember, Babies R Us (or Toys R Us) take coupons. And, you can also use a manufacturer coupon on those diapers to get even more for your money!

In 1956, P&G researcher Victor Mills disliked changing the cloth diapers of his newborn grandchild. So he assigned fellow researchers in P&G's Exploratory Division in Miami Valley, Ohio to look into making a better disposable diaper. Pampers were introduced in 1961. They were created by researchers at P&G including Vic Mills and Norma Lueders Baker. The name "Pampers" was coined by Alfred Goldman, Creative Director at Benton & Bowles, the first ad agency for the account.


The decision on how to diaper your baby need not be complicated – with so many modern options it's easy to browse and compare to see what's right for your family. Fans of cloth diapers can choose from flatfold cotton diapers, organic cotton prefolded diapers, snap closure diapering systems, diaper inserts, hybrid diapers and more. Make a splash with full–coverage, lightweight reusable swim diapers – they are perfect for fun at the beach, pool or back yard water play; compare disposable swim pants and reusable diapers to get the perfect fit. Your little one will be in baby diapers for at least a year or more, so take the time to research the many diapering solutions available today. Our selection of disposable diapers includes newborn diapers, diapers for sensitive skin, ultra–absorbent diapers, hypoallergenic and fragrance–free diapers, chlorine–free unbleached diapers and more. Discover the freedom of baby diaper covers and inserts too.

I was always a Pampers user with my first kid 4 years ago and just had my second. I was given Pampers again at the hospital when he was born and loved them again from the start. I love the wetness indicator so I know when to change him, they hold everything in well, and fit great. I'll keep relying only on Pampers for this baby like I did for my first!
The baby and children section here at Walgreens.com includes supplies for feeding, clothing and bathing. You can gently wash your baby with baby wash, no tears shampoo and baby conditioner. For infants, browse bottle feeding supplies that include bottles, nipples and burp cloths. If you have older kids, there's children's nutrition options such as puddings, shakes and other drinks.

In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]
Ok, these diapers are getting 3 stars because they HAVE held in what they're supposed to hold in. However, I really hate the texture of the diapers. They are "plastic-y". I LOVE the Pampers Swaddlers because they are soft, almost fabric-feeling. I bought a huge box of the Baby Dry kind because they were a few bucks cheaper, and thank God we are almost out of this box because I hate the plastic texture of the diaper. I guess that's just personal preference since they seem to perform just fine, but I prefer to have a soft little baby butt when I hold my little one, not a squishy plastic butt!

For your other diaper changing needs, you'll find changing pads and disposable diaper bags that can have different scents. A variety of colors, sizes and styles of diaper bags can help simplify taking everything on the go. Soothe and cleanse your baby's skin with diaper rash cream, baby lotion and baby wipes. If you use cloth diapers, you can stock up on diaper liners. For different occasions and stages of development, there are training pants and swim diapers.
The early 1990s also saw the introduction of gender-specific diapers in the Pampers brand; the product returned to unisex diapers towards the end of the decade. In 1993, Pampers introduced training pants, but the Pampers Trainers were a short lived product. Pampers did not sell training pants again until the introduction of Easy Up.[3] In 1996, P&G acquired Baby Fresh wipes from Kimberly-Clark; Kimberly-Clark had recently acquired Baby Fresh owner Scott Paper Company and was ordered to sell the wipes business.[4] In 1998, Procter & Gamble introduced its largest diaper at the time, Pampers Baby-Dry Size 6. It was promoted in an advertising campaign featuring pediatrician and child development expert Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, who said to let the child decide when the time is right to potty train. The size 6 diapers were billed for growing toddlers. Huggies also introduced a size 6 diaper at this time.[5]
Seattle area residents can contact WestSide Baby for free diapers. The non-profit organization is mostly run by volunteers from the community. They currently distribute almost 300,000 diapers to the low income, unemployed, and working poor in Washington. They also partner with numerous local organizations, including more than 100 social service agencies and charities. People can not only get free diapers from the organization, but they can also get toys, clothing, and baby equipment like cribs and car seats. Call (206) 767-1662

WETNES INDICATOR: These both have the wetness indicator line (shown in yellow) which turn blue when the diaper is wet. This is not a necessary diaper function, but can be slightly helpful when doing a quick diaper check. Although, the line tends to almost immediately turn blue once the diaper is applied - but not necessarily enough to change the diaper.
In the first couple of months, you may find yourself changing diapers up to 10 times in 24 hours. Diapers should be changed whenever they are wet or soiled. Your baby will often (but not always) let you know. With a super-absorbent diaper like Pampers diapers, you can tell if it's wet by feeling for lumps in the absorbent material. Here are some common times for changing diapers:

Another favorite is the Munchkin Step Diaper Pail ($64), which wins the odor control contest. This pail requires special bags and uses a baking soda dispenser (which you also have to refill) to control odor. It does require a bit of diaper-squishing, but not nearly as much as the Diaper Genie. If odor control is a top priority and you don’t mind buying special bags, this is your go-to.
For the design-conscious, an awesome yet pricier diaper pail is the Ubbi Steel Diaper Pail (right). At $69, this sleek diaper pail comes in dozens of different colors, is made of odor-blocking steel, AND doesn’t require special bags–  it’s the top selling diaper pail on Amazon. If you have the money, the Ubbi is as good as it gets. And really? This is a worthwhile place to spend a little extra. If you have more than one kid, you could be using this for years.
An average child will go through several thousand diapers in their life.[45] Since disposable diapers are discarded after a single use, usage of disposable diapers increases the burden on landfill sites, and increased environmental awareness has led to a growth in campaigns for parents to use reusable alternatives such as cloth or hybrid diapers.[46] An estimated 27.4 billion disposable diapers are used each year in the US, resulting in a possible 3.4 million tons of used diapers adding to landfills each year.[47] A discarded disposable diaper takes up to 450 years to decompose.[48]
In addition to the other two baby Registries, Babies R Us will PAY YOU 10% in reward dollars for anything purchased on your registry! WHAT?! Yes, that means you can use the money (via a gift card) to buy more items (aka get Diapers for FREE!), and remember, Babies R Us (or Toys R Us) take coupons. And, you can also use a manufacturer coupon on those diapers to get even more for your money!

There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
Babies may have their diapers changed five or more times a day.[23] Parents and other primary child care givers often carry spare diapers and necessities for diaper changing in a specialized diaper bag. Diapering may possibly serve as a good bonding experience for parent and child.[24] Children who wear diapers may experience skin irritation, commonly referred to as diaper rash, due to continual contact with fecal matter, as feces contains urease which catalyzes the conversion of the urea in urine to ammonia which can irritate the skin and can cause painful redness.[25]
Wrap your baby in Pampers Swaddlers diapers, our most trusted comfort and protection and the #1 choice of US hospitals.* Our Blankie Soft™ diaper with a unique Absorb Away Liner™ pulls wetness and mess away from baby's skin to help keep your baby comfortable. It also has a color-changing wetness indicator that tells you when your baby might need a change. And we make sure your baby's delicate belly is protected with the contoured umbilical notch.**
The Middle English word diaper originally referred to a type of cloth rather than the use thereof; "diaper" was the term for a pattern of repeated, rhombic shapes, and later came to describe a white cotton or linen fabric with this pattern.[2] The first cloth diapers consisted of a specific type of soft tissue sheet, cut into geometric shapes. This type of pattern was called diapering and eventually gave its name to the cloth used to make diapers and then to the diaper itself, which was traced back to 1590s England.[3] This usage stuck in the United States and Canada following the British colonization of North America, but in the United Kingdom the word "nappy" took its place. Most sources believe nappy is a diminutive form of the word napkin, which itself was originally a diminutive.[4]
The charity type agencies listed below receive donations of diapers (or the money to pay for them) from local businesses, civic groups, community businesses, schools and faith-based organizations. Free samples can also be provided to some clients. The goal is to help ensure children and their parents have diapers, wipes, and other personal cleaning supplies to ensure that the child is healthy. Find a listing of resources by state below.
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