Cloth diapers are reusable and can be made from natural fibers, synthetic materials, or a combination of both.[21] They are often made from industrial cotton which may be bleached white or left the fiber's natural color. Other natural fiber cloth materials include wool, bamboo, and unbleached hemp. Man-made materials such as an internal absorbent layer of microfiber toweling or an external waterproof layer of polyurethane laminate (PUL) may be used. Polyester fleece and faux suedecloth are often used inside cloth diapers as a "stay-dry" wicking liner because of the non-absorbent properties of those synthetic fibers.
If your goal is to get a trash can to conceal the smell, there are three that parents favor: the Baby Trend Diaper Champ ($34, pictured left) is an inexpensive pail that uses regular tall kitchen trash bags (yay!). Simply place the diaper in the opening, then pull the handle so it drops down into the can. So easy and best of all, no squishing a poop-filled mess through a narrow slot, like with the Diaper Genie (yuck!), although I will admit you can still smell poop with this one.
The decision on how to diaper your baby need not be complicated – with so many modern options it's easy to browse and compare to see what's right for your family. Fans of cloth diapers can choose from flatfold cotton diapers, organic cotton prefolded diapers, snap closure diapering systems, diaper inserts, hybrid diapers and more. Make a splash with full–coverage, lightweight reusable swim diapers – they are perfect for fun at the beach, pool or back yard water play; compare disposable swim pants and reusable diapers to get the perfect fit. Your little one will be in baby diapers for at least a year or more, so take the time to research the many diapering solutions available today. Our selection of disposable diapers includes newborn diapers, diapers for sensitive skin, ultra–absorbent diapers, hypoallergenic and fragrance–free diapers, chlorine–free unbleached diapers and more. Discover the freedom of baby diaper covers and inserts too.
The early 1990s also saw the introduction of gender-specific diapers in the Pampers brand; the product returned to unisex diapers towards the end of the decade. In 1993, Pampers introduced training pants, but the Pampers Trainers were a short lived product. Pampers did not sell training pants again until the introduction of Easy Up.[3] In 1996, P&G acquired Baby Fresh wipes from Kimberly-Clark; Kimberly-Clark had recently acquired Baby Fresh owner Scott Paper Company and was ordered to sell the wipes business.[4] In 1998, Procter & Gamble introduced its largest diaper at the time, Pampers Baby-Dry Size 6. It was promoted in an advertising campaign featuring pediatrician and child development expert Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, who said to let the child decide when the time is right to potty train. The size 6 diapers were billed for growing toddlers. Huggies also introduced a size 6 diaper at this time.[5]
Cloth diapers are reusable and can be made from natural fibers, synthetic materials, or a combination of both.[21] They are often made from industrial cotton which may be bleached white or left the fiber's natural color. Other natural fiber cloth materials include wool, bamboo, and unbleached hemp. Man-made materials such as an internal absorbent layer of microfiber toweling or an external waterproof layer of polyurethane laminate (PUL) may be used. Polyester fleece and faux suedecloth are often used inside cloth diapers as a "stay-dry" wicking liner because of the non-absorbent properties of those synthetic fibers.
There are several different organizations around the country that distribute free diapers to needy and low income families. Many of these are charities or churches, with some government programs also assisting. There are programs for single mothers, teenage moms, and families living in poverty. Anyone that needs free or low cost diapers near where they live, and that meets qualifications, may apply.
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