During the 1950s, companies such as Johnson and Johnson, Kendall, Parke-Davis, Playtex, and Molnlycke entered the disposable diaper market, and in 1956, Procter & Gamble began researching disposable diapers. Victor Mills, along with his project group including William Dehaas (both men who worked for the company) invented what would be trademarked "Pampers". Although Pampers were conceptualized in 1959, the diapers themselves were not launched into the market until 1961.[11] Pampers now accounts for more than $10 billion in annual revenue at Procter & Gamble.[12]
WARINING To avoid risk of choking, do not allow your child to tear the covering. Choking may result from anything children put in their mouths. Discard any torn or unsealed diaper. CAUTION: Like almost any article of clothing, disposable diapers will burn if exposed to flame. Always keep your child away from any source of flame. IMPORTANT: Shake baby soil into toilet. Wrap diaper inside its backsheet before discarding.DO NOT FLUSH DIAPER. PLEASE DO NOT LITTER. Made in the U.S.A. with domestic and imported parts.
Sometimes a parent will buy a brand of diapers that gives their child a rash, leaving them stuck with dozens, maybe even hundreds, of diapers that they cannot use for fear of massive diaper rash. These people then take to online groups like Craiglist, FreeCycle, or local Facebook yard sale or freebie groups. Even if they aren’t giving the diapers away, many of them drastically slice the cost of the diapers.
Wrap your baby in Pampers Swaddlers diapers, our most trusted comfort and protection and the #1 choice of US hospitals.* Our Blankie Soft™ diaper with a unique Absorb Away Liner™ pulls wetness and mess away from baby's skin to help keep your baby comfortable. It also has a color-changing wetness indicator that tells you when your baby might need a change. And we make sure your baby's delicate belly is protected with the contoured umbilical notch.**
The environmental impact of cloth as compared to disposable diapers has been studied several times. In one cradle-to-grave study sponsored by the National Association of Diaper Services (NADS) and conducted by Carl Lehrburger and colleagues, results found that disposable diapers produce seven times more solid waste when discarded and three times more waste in the manufacturing process. In addition, effluents from the plastic, pulp, and paper industries are far more hazardous than those from the cotton-growing and -manufacturing processes. Single-use diapers consume less water than reusables laundered at home, but more than those sent to a commercial diaper service. Washing cloth diapers at home uses 50 to 70 gallons (approx. 189 to 264 litres) of water every three days, which is roughly equivalent to flushing the toilet 15 times a day, unless the user has a high-efficiency washing machine. An average diaper service puts its diapers through an average of 13 water changes, but uses less water and energy per diaper than one laundry load at home.[49]

"Good-fitting diapers are important to the healthy growth and development of our smallest patients," said Anjanette Lee, MS, CCC/SLP, NTMTC, an infant development specialist at Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital in Houston, Texas, one of nine Level III and Level IV NICUs that tested the new diaper. "In our experience, we found Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers conformed to the baby's bottom without gapping or limiting leg movement. The thinner fasteners and less material at the waist provided a good fit for baby while still protecting their fragile skin."
I tried Pampers Swadlers for the first time with my baby because those were what the hospital had when she was born. I’ve been impressed by everything about them. They’re super absorbent, great for night time, and they keep my baby dry. Even if she poops and I don’t notice right away, it doesn’t stick on her skin, which makes it a lot easier to wipe and clean up. She hasn’t had any diaper rash since she was born. I also love how soft they are, so I know she’s comfortable. I’m not a huge fan of the baby powder smell, but it’s not so strong that it’s a turn off. These diapers have exceeded my expectations!
Seattle area residents can contact WestSide Baby for free diapers. The non-profit organization is mostly run by volunteers from the community. They currently distribute almost 300,000 diapers to the low income, unemployed, and working poor in Washington. They also partner with numerous local organizations, including more than 100 social service agencies and charities. People can not only get free diapers from the organization, but they can also get toys, clothing, and baby equipment like cribs and car seats. Call (206) 767-1662
Yes, Honest Company (and others) get a lot of publicity for their celebrity founders and Kardashian product placement, but generally, we are not impressed (to say the least, I’m being kind). They may be super cute, but parents frequently complain that diapers from the Honest Company and Parasol really don’t contain the elements, so to speak…which is the whole point. (Seriously, they have horror stories. And if you end up having to use twice as many diapers to prevent leakage, how much greener can they really be? Plus, who wants to be changing twice as many diapers?)
[Aside: Look, every time I throw a diaper in the trash can, I feel bad, okay? I am otherwise a very good citizen of the earth: I recycle and compost, I take mass transit every day instead of driving, I [used to] make baby food instead of buying it in the jar… but when it came to scooping poop from a diaper into the toilet, then washing a bunch of poop-stained diapers in the washing machine (for which I had to use COINS because we rented an apartment in the City), my head started to explode. I’m sorry, Mother Earth. I hope you’ll find it in your earthy heart to forgive me. I still love you.]
As of 2018, name-brand, mid-range disposable diapers in the U.S., such as Huggies and Pampers, were sold at an average cost of approximately US $0.20 to $0.30 cents each, and their manufacturers earned about two cents in profit from each diaper sold.[44] Premium brands had eco-friendly features, and sold for approximately twice that price.[44] Generic disposable diapers cost less per diaper, at an average price of $0.15 cents each, and the typical manufacturer's profit was about one cent per diaper.[44] However, the low-cost diapers needed to be changed more frequently, so the total cost savings was limited, as the lower cost per diaper was offset by the need to buy more diapers.[44]
The early 1990s also saw the introduction of gender-specific diapers in the Pampers brand; the product returned to unisex diapers towards the end of the decade. In 1993, Pampers introduced training pants, but the Pampers Trainers were a short lived product. Pampers did not sell training pants again until the introduction of Easy Up.[3] In 1996, P&G acquired Baby Fresh wipes from Kimberly-Clark; Kimberly-Clark had recently acquired Baby Fresh owner Scott Paper Company and was ordered to sell the wipes business.[4] In 1998, Procter & Gamble introduced its largest diaper at the time, Pampers Baby-Dry Size 6. It was promoted in an advertising campaign featuring pediatrician and child development expert Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, who said to let the child decide when the time is right to potty train. The size 6 diapers were billed for growing toddlers. Huggies also introduced a size 6 diaper at this time.[5]

Usually I don't like store brand diapers I've been accustomed to buying huggies, pampers, or sometimes luvs. On occasion when there's sales or I'm on the go and on my last diaper I've tried a few store brands that were horrible quality. Thanks to this sample I now know that walgreens well beginnings diapers are awesome, I will definitely keep purchasing these!


Although most commonly worn by and associated with babies and children, diapers are also worn by adults for a variety of reasons. In the medical community, they are usually referred to as "adult absorbent briefs" rather than diapers, which are associated with children and may have a negative connotation. The usage of adult diapers can be a source of embarrassment,[35] and products are often marketed under euphemisms such as incontinence pads. The most common adult users of diapers are those with medical conditions which cause them to experience urinary like bed wetting or fecal incontinence, or those who are bedridden or otherwise limited in their mobility.
Another favorite is the Munchkin Step Diaper Pail ($64), which wins the odor control contest. This pail requires special bags and uses a baking soda dispenser (which you also have to refill) to control odor. It does require a bit of diaper-squishing, but not nearly as much as the Diaper Genie. If odor control is a top priority and you don’t mind buying special bags, this is your go-to.
Sometimes, a written letter or email telling a diaper company about your baby’s birth (especially if you have multiples) asking for a product to sample can result in some free diapers. I wouldn’t really recommend going the “sob story” route too strong, but companies want to know you, their customer. If you ever have faulty diapers, be sure to contact them as most have a guarantee and will replace your defective diapers for free.

For more than 50 years, parents have trusted Pampers to care for their babies. Pampers is a part of The Procter & Gamble Company (NYSE:PG) and is the #1-selling diaper worldwide. Every day, more than 25 million babies in 100 countries around the world wear Pampers. Pampers offers a complete range of diapers, wipes and training pants designed to provide protection and comfort for every stage of baby’s development. Visit www.pampers.com to learn more about Pampers products, join the Pampers Rewards program, and find ideas and information to help your baby get the most out of love, sleep and play.
Ok, these diapers are getting 3 stars because they HAVE held in what they're supposed to hold in. However, I really hate the texture of the diapers. They are "plastic-y". I LOVE the Pampers Swaddlers because they are soft, almost fabric-feeling. I bought a huge box of the Baby Dry kind because they were a few bucks cheaper, and thank God we are almost out of this box because I hate the plastic texture of the diaper. I guess that's just personal preference since they seem to perform just fine, but I prefer to have a soft little baby butt when I hold my little one, not a squishy plastic butt!
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Babies may have their diapers changed five or more times a day.[23] Parents and other primary child care givers often carry spare diapers and necessities for diaper changing in a specialized diaper bag. Diapering may possibly serve as a good bonding experience for parent and child.[24] Children who wear diapers may experience skin irritation, commonly referred to as diaper rash, due to continual contact with fecal matter, as feces contains urease which catalyzes the conversion of the urea in urine to ammonia which can irritate the skin and can cause painful redness.[25]
Infant Crisis Services, Inc. helps families who are experiencing a crisis. They try to ensure that every toddler and baby gets access to life’s basic necessities. With the help of the members of the community, Infant Crisis Services supplies life-sustaining baby formula and food. In addition, they run a bank that provides free diapers and clothing for both toddlers and babies in times of crisis. Over 1,000 babies and toddlers get help in central Oklahoma and Oklahoma City every month. 405-528-3663
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