If you’re spending that much, and you’re in the market for something with a few more bells and whistles, I also like the Hatch Baby Grow ($129), an integrated baby scale and changing pad in one. The scale allows you to track weight gain, milk intake and other such things that are typically only ascertained by a visit to a pediatrician’s office. I would especially recommend this for parents who are the “need to know” type (those who like to have lots of data) or if you have any reason to expect a preemie (you are pregnant with multiples, high risk, etc.).

As a first time mom it was pretty overwhelming having to decide on what to use for my baby. Everything including baby wash, lotion, laundry detergent, wipes, and diapers come in so many varieties I didn’t know where to start. I was lucky enough to receive sample diapers from about 5 different brands including Pampers Swaddlers. These are the only diapers that never let me down. Super soft, no leaks, ultra absorbent, great fit. Without giving TMI, there have been many moments where I was surprised by how much they contained. And without leaks! I also have peace of mind knowing that my baby can stay in his diaper all night if necessary without any worry of leaks or discomfort. It was also a very smooth transition into bigger sizes. We started off with newborn, then into size 1 and now size 2. When we’re done with our current box then we will most likely purchase size 3 for our 3 1/2 month old baby. I just really love how reliable the Pampers Swaddlers are and intend on using these the entire time our baby’s in diapers.
A diaper bank known as Happy Bottoms serves people in the Kansas City area. The organization is a partnership of Cornerstones of Care and Healthy Families of Kansas City. The goal is to coordinate free diaper drives that will then go ahead and support local agencies serving low income families in the community. They also offer information on WIC and government benefits. Provides free diapers to Kansas City area agencies and social service groups.
Diapers are primarily worn by infants, toddlers who are not yet potty trained, and by children who experience bedwetting. They are also used by adults with incontinence, in certain circumstances where access to a toilet is unavailable or for psychological reasons. These can include those of advanced age, patients bed-bound in a hospital, individuals with certain types of physical or mental disability, diaper fetishists, and people working in extreme conditions, such as astronauts. It is not uncommon for people to wear diapers under dry suits.
Yes, Honest Company (and others) get a lot of publicity for their celebrity founders and Kardashian product placement, but generally, we are not impressed (to say the least, I’m being kind). They may be super cute, but parents frequently complain that diapers from the Honest Company and Parasol really don’t contain the elements, so to speak…which is the whole point. (Seriously, they have horror stories. And if you end up having to use twice as many diapers to prevent leakage, how much greener can they really be? Plus, who wants to be changing twice as many diapers?)
The environmental impact of cloth as compared to disposable diapers has been studied several times. In one cradle-to-grave study sponsored by the National Association of Diaper Services (NADS) and conducted by Carl Lehrburger and colleagues, results found that disposable diapers produce seven times more solid waste when discarded and three times more waste in the manufacturing process. In addition, effluents from the plastic, pulp, and paper industries are far more hazardous than those from the cotton-growing and -manufacturing processes. Single-use diapers consume less water than reusables laundered at home, but more than those sent to a commercial diaper service. Washing cloth diapers at home uses 50 to 70 gallons (approx. 189 to 264 litres) of water every three days, which is roughly equivalent to flushing the toilet 15 times a day, unless the user has a high-efficiency washing machine. An average diaper service puts its diapers through an average of 13 water changes, but uses less water and energy per diaper than one laundry load at home.[49]

Target – Did you know you can get this awesome gift bag filled with free baby stuff when you create a Target Baby Registry? The picture above shows what I got; free diaper samples, wipes, bottles, pacifiers, coupons, plus much more. To see a detailed list of what came in my Target gift bag, click here. To get your free gift, just create a baby registry online. You’ll get an email from Target explaining how to pick up your gift bag at a Target store. This is a limited supply offer, so make sure to get yours today! 🙂
These early diapers were bulky, heavy products composed of fluff pulp with a rayon topsheet, polyethylene backsheet. In 1966, Pampers launched a 'wingfold' design and by 1969 started a "third size". By this time, Pampers had become a national brand in the United States.[citation needed] Procter and Gamble replaced the pin-on design with tapes in 1971. Toddler and Premature Infant sizes were also introduced. In 1973, P&G developed elasticized single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas to aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which had not been absorbed. In fact, the first patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper was in 1973 by P&G.[1] In 1982, Pampers introduced an elasticized wingfold diaper with elastic leg gathers and refastenable tapes which was a cross between the early 1960s design and the modern hourglass shape, a feature that was first introduced on Luvs in 1976 and evolved into an industry standard in 1985.[citation needed] In 1986, thin diapers made with absorbent gelling material were released. This made the average weight of a typical medium size diaper decrease by 50%.[2] In 1987, Pampers and Huggies both introduced frontal tape systems which allow repositioning of the lateral tape without tearing the diaper. In the 1990s Pampers introduced a thinner diaper known as Ultra Dry Thins.
There are resources available to you if you need them, though. Also, don't discount cloth diapers if you have the means to launder them. They're often easier to get at free or reduced cost, not to mention they're way better for the environment, and you can be super smug about that. (Unrelated, but once you're done diapering your baby, those diapers really make the best dusting cloths and glass cleaners.)
Destiny Diaper Bank covers the entire southwest Florida area. The non-profit almost 700,000 diapers a year to the low income and needy. They may also provide free samples or coupons to buy them. They have five sites throughout southwest Florida that they distribute diapers from, and also partner with local social service agencies. The group is run by volunteers. Cape Coral, Florida. Call (239)-549-2130.
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