Like many other reviewers on here, we tried Baby Dry diapers as an alternative to Swaddlers and were sorry that we did. On a baby who is still on breast milk, the diapers resulted in feces going up their back and stomach, which soaked clothing, blankets and whatever else she happen to be touching. Our daughter's onesie was completely saturated in fecal matter, so we had to cut it off of her as to not get it on her face while trying to pull it over her head. So we lost $50 and a onesie, had to wash the bouncer, blanket, and my clothing, but we gained 276 useless diapers. It seems like you'd be better off using a handkerchief instead of Baby Dry diapers. I could only imagine the damage if she were on solid foods. Now that we're out diapers that work, we have to run to Babies-R-Us to get Swaddlers until the ones from Amazon arrive.

There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
Baby diapers come in packages that contain anywhere from 12 to 160 diapers. This way, you can start by trying out smaller packages of different kinds and then stock up once you find your favorite. If you prefer cloth diapers, we carry different colors and sizes from brand gDiapers that are machine washable. You'll also find eco friendly diapers that are chlorine-free and sometimes plastic-free.
I used nothing but Pampers Swaddlers for my twin newborn babies 4 years ago and then switched to Pampers pull ups for them. None of the other brands compare to the comfort for your babies and children because they are so stretchy without any hard velcro-like corners on them like other brands. I was beyond excited when I found the Pampers Pure line for my most recent baby, 9 months now, because I try to buy everything as natural as possible. They’re super cute and better all the way around than any other diaper sold!
Cloth diapers are reusable and can be made from natural fibers, synthetic materials, or a combination of both.[21] They are often made from industrial cotton which may be bleached white or left the fiber's natural color. Other natural fiber cloth materials include wool, bamboo, and unbleached hemp. Man-made materials such as an internal absorbent layer of microfiber toweling or an external waterproof layer of polyurethane laminate (PUL) may be used. Polyester fleece and faux suedecloth are often used inside cloth diapers as a "stay-dry" wicking liner because of the non-absorbent properties of those synthetic fibers.
These are my favorite diapers and a favorite among eco-moms. They are hypoallergenic, chlorine-free, affordable, and perform exceptionally well. IMO, these diapers are the best combo of eco-friendly and absorbent. All of that, and they cost about the same as Pampers or Huggies. Some users say they run smaller than these mainstream brands, just FYI.

Pampers is marketed in various ways, such as print ads and television commercials. Print ads often appear in magazines and other periodicals. Television commercials appear during soap operas co-produced by Procter and Gamble, such as Bold and the Beautiful & Young and the Restless, and during the airing of parenting shows. Another way Pampers is promoted is through product placement. Pampers paid $50,000 to be featured in the film Three Men and a Baby.[citation needed] P&G has also sponsored the program Make Room for Baby on the Discovery Health Channel. Pampers has been promoted in some countries on billboards. Another method that has been used to promote the product is direct marketing program where relevant content is mailed to mothers with babies. These mailings can include Pampers samples or Pampers Coupons.
Fantastic! My son has had some pretty big messy diapers but not once have we had a leak!! Very happy with Pampers Baby Dry diapers. We went from Pampers Swaddlers Newborn to Baby Dry size 1. With the cost savings I wanted to give them a try and they work great... Good gathers around the legs and the are snug at the waist, especially the backside. There have been some 'oh boy' moments - anticipating a leak but NOPE! My only wish is if they could have the color line indicator for wetness but I can actually tell by looking for that telltale yellow front or back (he's breastfed). It's easy to see through the outside plastic and see if you have a full diaper. Two thumbs up!! I will definitely reorder. We are 3/4 through a case and have been using them for a month.
The early 1990s also saw the introduction of gender-specific diapers in the Pampers brand; the product returned to unisex diapers towards the end of the decade. In 1993, Pampers introduced training pants, but the Pampers Trainers were a short lived product. Pampers did not sell training pants again until the introduction of Easy Up.[3] In 1996, P&G acquired Baby Fresh wipes from Kimberly-Clark; Kimberly-Clark had recently acquired Baby Fresh owner Scott Paper Company and was ordered to sell the wipes business.[4] In 1998, Procter & Gamble introduced its largest diaper at the time, Pampers Baby-Dry Size 6. It was promoted in an advertising campaign featuring pediatrician and child development expert Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, who said to let the child decide when the time is right to potty train. The size 6 diapers were billed for growing toddlers. Huggies also introduced a size 6 diaper at this time.[5]
I was always a Pampers user with my first kid 4 years ago and just had my second. I was given Pampers again at the hospital when he was born and loved them again from the start. I love the wetness indicator so I know when to change him, they hold everything in well, and fit great. I'll keep relying only on Pampers for this baby like I did for my first!
Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
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