Wrap your baby in Pampers Swaddlers diapers, our most trusted comfort and protection and the #1 choice of US hospitals.* Our Blankie Soft™ diaper with a unique Absorb Away Liner™ pulls wetness and mess away from baby's skin to help keep your baby comfortable. It also has a color-changing wetness indicator that tells you when your baby might need a change. And we make sure your baby's delicate belly is protected with the contoured umbilical notch.**
San Francisco, San Mateo, San Jose, and Bay area California - The goal of the Bay Area Diaper Bank and other local groups is to distribute free diapers to agencies throughout northern California that serve mothers and children in need. Thousands of families take advantage of the assistance program every month. Find resources in San Francisco and San Mateo County.
These are my favorite diapers and a favorite among eco-moms. They are hypoallergenic, chlorine-free, affordable, and perform exceptionally well. IMO, these diapers are the best combo of eco-friendly and absorbent. All of that, and they cost about the same as Pampers or Huggies. Some users say they run smaller than these mainstream brands, just FYI.
Diapers are an essential part of a parent's life and continue to be so until their child is completely potty trained. As your child starts growing older, there are various indications that can tell you that your child is now ready to be potty trained. Let your child set his or her own pace to be potty trained while you encourage your child with positive reinforcements such as training pants.
Women and Children's Center of the Sierras, 3905 Neil Road, Suite 2, Reno Nevada 89509, (775) 825-7395. If you live in Las Vegas or the Clark County region, call this agency or use the following resource for referrals and additional information. Diapers, food stamps applications, and other support for pregnant mothers and low income parents is offered. Find diapers in Clark County and Las Vegas.
You’ll also need 2 or 3 changing pad covers (roughly $10 a piece). They get soiled pretty quickly so you’ll need more than one. On top of the changing pad cover, you will also need a whole bunch of waterproof pads (the white pad) as an added layer of protection — these are much easier to wash than the covers, and run $13 for a 3 pack. Get a whole bunch; you’ll be washing them all the time.

For the design-conscious, an awesome yet pricier diaper pail is the Ubbi Steel Diaper Pail (right). At $69, this sleek diaper pail comes in dozens of different colors, is made of odor-blocking steel, AND doesn’t require special bags–  it’s the top selling diaper pail on Amazon. If you have the money, the Ubbi is as good as it gets. And really? This is a worthwhile place to spend a little extra. If you have more than one kid, you could be using this for years.
Cindy – the formula companies do change their freebie offers from time-to-time. I received a free diaper bag from Enfamil with a cooler pack, 2 free cans of formula, and other baby samples. Similac & Gerber both sent me cans of formula and coupons but not in an actual diaper bag. Some of our visitors have received the free diaper bags at the hospital when they delivered their baby. However, not all hospitals participate.

If your goal is to get a trash can to conceal the smell, there are three that parents favor: the Baby Trend Diaper Champ ($34, pictured left) is an inexpensive pail that uses regular tall kitchen trash bags (yay!). Simply place the diaper in the opening, then pull the handle so it drops down into the can. So easy and best of all, no squishing a poop-filled mess through a narrow slot, like with the Diaper Genie (yuck!), although I will admit you can still smell poop with this one.

If you’re spending that much, and you’re in the market for something with a few more bells and whistles, I also like the Hatch Baby Grow ($129), an integrated baby scale and changing pad in one. The scale allows you to track weight gain, milk intake and other such things that are typically only ascertained by a visit to a pediatrician’s office. I would especially recommend this for parents who are the “need to know” type (those who like to have lots of data) or if you have any reason to expect a preemie (you are pregnant with multiples, high risk, etc.).
At the time the Pampers Size 6 were introduced, there was a debate between a pediatrician, T. Berry Brazelton, and syndicated columnist and best-selling author of books for parents, John Rosemond. The controversy was about the length of time a baby should wear diapers and when to start toilet training. Rosemond believes it is a "slap to the intelligence of a human being that one would allow baby to continue soiling and wetting him/herself past age 2."[20] While Rosemond concedes that Brazelton has been giving the same advice for decades, he criticized the pediatrician for serving as a consultant to Pampers, a division of Procter & Gamble, and for appearing in Pampers commercials.[21]
Many of these groups work with companies such as Huggies and their Every Little Bottom program. They may also have partnerships in place with Pampers and other diaper manufacturers so that samples can be given out to parents that request them. These are just a few of the non-profits and charities that distribute free diapers, but each state will also have clothing closets that can be contacted.

Although most commonly worn by and associated with babies and children, diapers are also worn by adults for a variety of reasons. In the medical community, they are usually referred to as "adult absorbent briefs" rather than diapers, which are associated with children and may have a negative connotation. The usage of adult diapers can be a source of embarrassment,[35] and products are often marketed under euphemisms such as incontinence pads. The most common adult users of diapers are those with medical conditions which cause them to experience urinary like bed wetting or fecal incontinence, or those who are bedridden or otherwise limited in their mobility.
These are my favorite diapers and a favorite among eco-moms. They are hypoallergenic, chlorine-free, affordable, and perform exceptionally well. IMO, these diapers are the best combo of eco-friendly and absorbent. All of that, and they cost about the same as Pampers or Huggies. Some users say they run smaller than these mainstream brands, just FYI.
An average child will go through several thousand diapers in their life.[45] Since disposable diapers are discarded after a single use, usage of disposable diapers increases the burden on landfill sites, and increased environmental awareness has led to a growth in campaigns for parents to use reusable alternatives such as cloth or hybrid diapers.[46] An estimated 27.4 billion disposable diapers are used each year in the US, resulting in a possible 3.4 million tons of used diapers adding to landfills each year.[47] A discarded disposable diaper takes up to 450 years to decompose.[48]
HUGGIES Size Three Snug & Dry Diapers give your baby great protection at a great value. Four layers of protection absorb moisture quickly to help stop leaks for up to 12 hours, and a quilted liner helps to keep your baby dry and comfortable. Plus, Snug & Dry disposable baby diapers have a wetness indicator stripe on the outside that changes from yellow to blue when wet, which helps take the guesswork out of diaper changes. Featuring fun Disney Mickey Mouse designs, Snug & Dry Diapers are available in sizes Newborn (up to 10 lb.), 1 (8-14 lb.), 2 (12-18 lb.), 3 (16-28 lb.), 4 (22-37 lb.), 5 (27+ lb.) and 6 (35+ lb.). Join HUGGIES Rewards to earn points on every pack of HUGGIES diapers and wipes you buy.
If you can’t afford diapers right now, then I want to mention that there are loads of places that give out FREE Diapers to those in need. They are called “Diaper Banks” and they are on a mission to make up for the diaper “gap” in order for every baby to have clean diapers. If you have extra diapers, BabyCycle in St. Pete and HereWeGrow in Dunedin are both in desperate need of your diapers.
These early diapers were bulky, heavy products composed of fluff pulp with a rayon topsheet, polyethylene backsheet. In 1966, Pampers launched a 'wingfold' design and by 1969 started a "third size". By this time, Pampers had become a national brand in the United States.[citation needed] Procter and Gamble replaced the pin-on design with tapes in 1971. Toddler and Premature Infant sizes were also introduced. In 1973, P&G developed elasticized single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas to aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which had not been absorbed. In fact, the first patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper was in 1973 by P&G.[1] In 1982, Pampers introduced an elasticized wingfold diaper with elastic leg gathers and refastenable tapes which was a cross between the early 1960s design and the modern hourglass shape, a feature that was first introduced on Luvs in 1976 and evolved into an industry standard in 1985.[citation needed] In 1986, thin diapers made with absorbent gelling material were released. This made the average weight of a typical medium size diaper decrease by 50%.[2] In 1987, Pampers and Huggies both introduced frontal tape systems which allow repositioning of the lateral tape without tearing the diaper. In the 1990s Pampers introduced a thinner diaper known as Ultra Dry Thins.
Things of My Very Own, Inc.-Crisis Intervention Center, 202 Front Street, Schenectady New York 12305, 518-630-5146. The capital region and down state are covered. So if you live in Albany or New York City you can call for information on diaper assistance programs. Thousands of working poor families with young babies get the free diapers they need from this NYC non-profit.
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