But honestly, cloth diapers, as I mentioned earlier, have the most robust free diaper programs and they're the easiest to access. Groups like Giving Diapers, Giving Hope and The Rebecca Foundation's Cloth Diaper Closet offer free cloth diapers to those in need. Alternatively, you can get free or very cheap cloth diapers from online forums like Diaper Swappers that specialize in recycled (highly laundered) cloth diapers. Change-Diapers.com is a great resource with a link every Friday for cloth diaper giveaways they've found online, too.
There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
The Middle English word diaper originally referred to a type of cloth rather than the use thereof; "diaper" was the term for a pattern of repeated, rhombic shapes, and later came to describe a white cotton or linen fabric with this pattern.[2] The first cloth diapers consisted of a specific type of soft tissue sheet, cut into geometric shapes. This type of pattern was called diapering and eventually gave its name to the cloth used to make diapers and then to the diaper itself, which was traced back to 1590s England.[3] This usage stuck in the United States and Canada following the British colonization of North America, but in the United Kingdom the word "nappy" took its place. Most sources believe nappy is a diminutive form of the word napkin, which itself was originally a diminutive.[4]

Earlier this month, Procter & Gamble PG, +0.82%  Pampers’ parent company, announced this week that prices for Pampers products will increase by an average of 4%, though it depends on the size and type of diaper as well as the retailer. Target TGT, -2.09% sells a 100-count pack of Pampers Swaddlers diapers for $24.99, which, with the increase, would rise to almost $26.


Sometimes when you complete a baby registry you are often given free diapers and other coupons or freebies (like bottles or formula samples). I am not sure which stores offer what exactly, but most will offer you a discount on items left on your registry after your baby’s arrival (and that someone didn’t buy you), often including diapers and wipes! Target Baby Registry offers a free welcome gift for $60 worth of coupons and handpicked samples of their favorite brands. And Amazon Baby Registry‘s Welcome Box is valued at $35 and currently offers a package of baby wipes (among other items). See my full list of 5 Best Baby Registry Stores to see what other sites are offering.
In October 2008, "An updated lifecycle assessment study for disposable and reusable nappies" by the UK Environment Agency and Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs stated that reusable diapers can cause significantly less (up to 40 per cent) or significantly more damage to the environment than disposable ones, depending mostly on how parents wash and dry them. The "baseline scenario" showed that the difference in green-house emissions was insignificant (in fact, disposables even scored slightly better). However, much better results (emission cuts of up to 40 per cent) could be achieved by using reusable diapers more rationally. "The report shows that, in contrast to the use of disposable nappies, it is consumers' behaviour after purchase that determines most of the impacts from reusable nappies. Cloth nappy users can reduce their environmental impacts by:

Usually I don't like store brand diapers I've been accustomed to buying huggies, pampers, or sometimes luvs. On occasion when there's sales or I'm on the go and on my last diaper I've tried a few store brands that were horrible quality. Thanks to this sample I now know that walgreens well beginnings diapers are awesome, I will definitely keep purchasing these!
A diaper bank known as Happy Bottoms serves people in the Kansas City area. The organization is a partnership of Cornerstones of Care and Healthy Families of Kansas City. The goal is to coordinate free diaper drives that will then go ahead and support local agencies serving low income families in the community. They also offer information on WIC and government benefits. Provides free diapers to Kansas City area agencies and social service groups.

If you’re spending that much, and you’re in the market for something with a few more bells and whistles, I also like the Hatch Baby Grow ($129), an integrated baby scale and changing pad in one. The scale allows you to track weight gain, milk intake and other such things that are typically only ascertained by a visit to a pediatrician’s office. I would especially recommend this for parents who are the “need to know” type (those who like to have lots of data) or if you have any reason to expect a preemie (you are pregnant with multiples, high risk, etc.).
I like to use my diaper pail for pee diapers only. For the poopy diapers, buy rolls of Arm and Hammer diaper disposal bags (mentioned above). Put your poopy diapers in the little bag and simply throw it out every night (outside, like in the big garbage can). Is it a pain? Yeah, sort of, but it’s the only real way to keep your nursery from smelling like, well, shit. Or you can just put the poop diapers in there and deal with the smell. Your choice.
Diapers have been worn throughout human history. They are made of cloth or synthetic disposable materials. Cloth diapers are composed of layers of fabric such as cotton, hemp, bamboo, microfiber, or even plastic fibers such as PLA, and can be washed and reused multiple times. Disposable diapers contain absorbent chemicals and are thrown away after use. Plastic pants can be worn over diapers to avoid leaks, but with modern cloth diapers, this is no longer necessary.[citation needed]
[Aside: Look, every time I throw a diaper in the trash can, I feel bad, okay? I am otherwise a very good citizen of the earth: I recycle and compost, I take mass transit every day instead of driving, I [used to] make baby food instead of buying it in the jar… but when it came to scooping poop from a diaper into the toilet, then washing a bunch of poop-stained diapers in the washing machine (for which I had to use COINS because we rented an apartment in the City), my head started to explode. I’m sorry, Mother Earth. I hope you’ll find it in your earthy heart to forgive me. I still love you.]
In 1956, P&G researcher Victor Mills disliked changing the cloth diapers of his newborn grandchild. So he assigned fellow researchers in P&G's Exploratory Division in Miami Valley, Ohio to look into making a better disposable diaper. Pampers were introduced in 1961. They were created by researchers at P&G including Vic Mills and Norma Lueders Baker. The name "Pampers" was coined by Alfred Goldman, Creative Director at Benton & Bowles, the first ad agency for the account.
Infant Crisis Services, Inc. helps families who are experiencing a crisis. They try to ensure that every toddler and baby gets access to life’s basic necessities. With the help of the members of the community, Infant Crisis Services supplies life-sustaining baby formula and food. In addition, they run a bank that provides free diapers and clothing for both toddlers and babies in times of crisis. Over 1,000 babies and toddlers get help in central Oklahoma and Oklahoma City every month. 405-528-3663
A diaper (American English) or a nappy (Australian English and British English) is a type of underwear that allows the wearer to defecate or urinate without the use of a toilet, by absorbing or containing waste products to prevent soiling of outer clothing or the external environment. When diapers become soiled, they require changing, generally by a second person such as a parent or caregiver. Failure to change a diaper on a sufficiently regular basis can result in skin problems around the area covered by the diaper.

Of course, diapers are just one of the many expenses parents incur by raising a child; parents can spend up to $24,000 in the first year alone. Subscription services for diapers can seem convenient, but aren’t the most economical, Burg added. “Those who coupon and deal hunt are able to significantly reduce that number, but that takes dedication,” she said.
Like many other reviewers on here, we tried Baby Dry diapers as an alternative to Swaddlers and were sorry that we did. On a baby who is still on breast milk, the diapers resulted in feces going up their back and stomach, which soaked clothing, blankets and whatever else she happen to be touching. Our daughter's onesie was completely saturated in fecal matter, so we had to cut it off of her as to not get it on her face while trying to pull it over her head. So we lost $50 and a onesie, had to wash the bouncer, blanket, and my clothing, but we gained 276 useless diapers. It seems like you'd be better off using a handkerchief instead of Baby Dry diapers. I could only imagine the damage if she were on solid foods. Now that we're out diapers that work, we have to run to Babies-R-Us to get Swaddlers until the ones from Amazon arrive.
Children may have problems with bladder control (primarily at night), until eight years or older, and may wear diapers while sleeping to control bedwetting.[31] The Children's Health and Wellness website claims that diapering a child can prolong bedwetting, as it sends a "message of permission" to urinate in their sleep.[32] Dr Anthony Page of the Creative Child Online Magazine claims that children can get used to their diapers and begin to view them as a comfort, and that of the children surveyed, most would rather wear diapers than worry about getting up at night to go to the toilet.[33] In a series of online surveys, Robert A Pretlow, MD, of eHealth International, Inc., cites an identical figure. He argues that if Internet users are representative of society as a whole, these surveys imply that a fetishistic or emotional attraction to diapers may be responsible for these "comfort" cases, and that "these behaviors are a significant cause of enuresis and incontinence." He called for further studies to be done on the topic.[34]
Ever since their introduction several decades ago, product innovations include the use of superabsorbent polymers, resealable tapes, and elasticised waist bands. They are now much thinner and much more absorbent. The product range has more recently been extended into children's toilet training phase with the introduction of training pants and pant diapers, which are now undergarments.
Huggies Little Snugglers diapers are specially designed for gentle skin protection. With features like the pocketed-back waistband and GentleAbsorb liner that contain and draw the mess away, Little Snugglers help keep your baby?s delicate skin clean and healthy. Little Snugglers diapers also feature premium softness and breathability to help keep them comfortable. Little Snugglers diapers have double grip strips for a comfy fit that lasts, plus a wetness indicator that lets you know when it?s time for a change. In addition, Little Snugglers disposable diapers are fragrance-free, and feature NEW adorable Disney Baby Winnie the Pooh designs. Start your diaper-changing routine with Huggies Natural Care Wipes for a soft, gentle clean, then finish with Little Snugglers diapers. Join Huggies Rewards to earn points on all your Huggies purchases.
Cuties Wipes are made with the same high quality materials as Cuties Diapers — Aloe, Vitamin E and Chamomile. These hypoallergenic wipes are soft on baby’s skin, yet durable enough to clean up tough messes. Cuties Wipes Tri-Form fabric has two soft outer layers and one strong inner layer to prevent the wipe from tearing. Soft pack wipes can be easily opened with a push of the finger to ensure that clean-up is sanitary.
A baby may need to be changed up to 14 times a day, which makes buying diapers and wipes in bulk a smart and convenient solution. Stock up on baby wipes designed to keep your baby's face, hands and bottom clean and soft. Choose from wipes that feature soothing aloe, are eco-friendly, or fragrance-free for sensitive skin. From preemie to toddler sizes, you can wrap your baby in a diaper that gently hugs their body and offers superb absorbent protection both day and night.
Congratulations @givehealthjmh, and all other recent recipients of our #NoBabyUnhugged grant program: @ChildrensHealthcareofAtlanta, @ChildrensHospitalFoxValley, @PalmBeachChildrensHospital, @sanfordhealthfoundation, @StJohnsRegionalMedicalCenter, and @UMarylandChildrensHospital! Huggies is proud to support your volunteer hugger programs to share the Power of Hugs! ❤ Learn more or apply for a grant for your hospital at the Power of Hugs page on HuggiesHealthcare.com.

A diaper bank known as Happy Bottoms serves people in the Kansas City area. The organization is a partnership of Cornerstones of Care and Healthy Families of Kansas City. The goal is to coordinate free diaper drives that will then go ahead and support local agencies serving low income families in the community. They also offer information on WIC and government benefits. Provides free diapers to Kansas City area agencies and social service groups.
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