There are several different organizations around the country that distribute free diapers to needy and low income families. Many of these are charities or churches, with some government programs also assisting. There are programs for single mothers, teenage moms, and families living in poverty. Anyone that needs free or low cost diapers near where they live, and that meets qualifications, may apply.

Basically these are the best diapers around. You look at them and think, “what is that mesh layer for?” Then one night, around 3 am, you discuss with your husband sending gifts to the makers of Pampers, specifically the engineers and designers who made said mesh layer. You have enough to think about as a new parent. Just buys these diapers would ya?

To all ladies who have commented and those just reading…emails and calling 1-800 numbers may only get you so far. I actually took time to write a formal letter to Johnson and Johnson as a class project in school and was sent all types of samples and a really nice letter in response. Try it old school and you may at least get a good coupon if not samples of many types. BUT, you have to be nice in your letter to them not acting as if you are owed something. Tell them you’ve used their products for years, or know of those who have and that you are interested in trying certain items, your due date….if they had promotional item(s) you could try. Boost their EGO and they might boost you with gear/samples. Just throwing it out there – Good luck!
There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]

Cloth diapers are reusable and can be made from natural fibers, synthetic materials, or a combination of both.[21] They are often made from industrial cotton which may be bleached white or left the fiber's natural color. Other natural fiber cloth materials include wool, bamboo, and unbleached hemp. Man-made materials such as an internal absorbent layer of microfiber toweling or an external waterproof layer of polyurethane laminate (PUL) may be used. Polyester fleece and faux suedecloth are often used inside cloth diapers as a "stay-dry" wicking liner because of the non-absorbent properties of those synthetic fibers.
Many of these groups work with companies such as Huggies and their Every Little Bottom program. They may also have partnerships in place with Pampers and other diaper manufacturers so that samples can be given out to parents that request them. These are just a few of the non-profits and charities that distribute free diapers, but each state will also have clothing closets that can be contacted.
All those diaper expenses add up. In its first year, a baby can go through 2,500 to 3,000 diapers, costing parents between $500 and $1,000, said Jen Dicks Burg, blogger at the The Suburban Mom and mother to three girls. BabyCenter, an online media company for parents and expectant parents, estimates that disposable diapers cost $72 per month for the first year (or $864 a year), based on a survey of more than 1,000 new moms.

For the design-conscious, an awesome yet pricier diaper pail is the Ubbi Steel Diaper Pail (right). At $69, this sleek diaper pail comes in dozens of different colors, is made of odor-blocking steel, AND doesn’t require special bags–  it’s the top selling diaper pail on Amazon. If you have the money, the Ubbi is as good as it gets. And really? This is a worthwhile place to spend a little extra. If you have more than one kid, you could be using this for years.


Kelly – yes they are encouraging breastfeeding – but there are many of our visitors who are receiving the free diaper bags. Enfamil has a new diaper bag that contains bottles for pumped (expressed) milk, milk storage bags, and other samples for breastfeeding included with the free formula. You may want to call Enfamil, Similac, and Gerber directly to request free samples. 🙂
I called Enfamil and they told me that I should receive the samples around my due date. I also called Gerber they said the only thing they will do is send out email stating samples are available and you would have to proceed through the email. I will keep a watch out for this email. Gerber also mentioned they discontinued the nutrition pack about a year ago.
Of course, diapers are just one of the many expenses parents incur by raising a child; parents can spend up to $24,000 in the first year alone. Subscription services for diapers can seem convenient, but aren’t the most economical, Burg added. “Those who coupon and deal hunt are able to significantly reduce that number, but that takes dedication,” she said.
Modern cloth diapers come in a host of shapes, including preformed cloth diapers, all-in-one diapers with waterproof exteriors, fitted diaper with covers and pocket or "stuffable" diapers, which consist of a water-resistant outer shell sewn with an opening for insertion of absorbent material inserts.[22] Many design features of modern cloth diapers have followed directly from innovations initially developed in disposable diapers, such as the use of the hour glass shape, materials to separate moisture from skin and the use of double gussets, or an inner elastic band for better fit and containment of waste material.[21] Several cloth diaper brands use variations of Procter & Gamble's original 1973 patent use of a double gusset in Pampers.[13]

Service Center of Catholic Social Services, main address 555 Dauphin Street, Mobile Alabama 36602, main phone 215-431-1511. In addition to free diapers, other government funded social services may be provided. This can include cribs for a thrift store, free formula, and applications for the WIC Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children program.

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