I like to use my diaper pail for pee diapers only. For the poopy diapers, buy rolls of Arm and Hammer diaper disposal bags (mentioned above). Put your poopy diapers in the little bag and simply throw it out every night (outside, like in the big garbage can). Is it a pain? Yeah, sort of, but it’s the only real way to keep your nursery from smelling like, well, shit. Or you can just put the poop diapers in there and deal with the smell. Your choice.
At the time the Pampers Size 6 were introduced, there was a debate between a pediatrician, T. Berry Brazelton, and syndicated columnist and best-selling author of books for parents, John Rosemond. The controversy was about the length of time a baby should wear diapers and when to start toilet training. Rosemond believes it is a "slap to the intelligence of a human being that one would allow baby to continue soiling and wetting him/herself past age 2."[20] While Rosemond concedes that Brazelton has been giving the same advice for decades, he criticized the pediatrician for serving as a consultant to Pampers, a division of Procter & Gamble, and for appearing in Pampers commercials.[21]

As parents ourselves, we can vividly remember the feelings of fear, anxiousness, and excitement that come along with the first little bundle of joy! Knowing that we've been able to offer a trustworthy diapers that have worked wonderfully for your family brings us so much joy, and we want to thank you for sharing this with us. Our number is (800)726-7377, reach out to us any time if you ever have any questions!


There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
"We're passionate about helping all babies thrive, especially the smallest and most fragile. This Huggies diaper reflects our ongoing commitment to deliver innovative solutions for the NICU," said Eleonora Daireaux, Vice President, Huggies North America. "After hearing of the need for a diaper that meets the special requirements of these babies, our expert teams in skin science, research, product safety and manufacturing were inspired. Knowing every second counts for these babies, the team acted quickly to bring Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers from concept to launch in hospitals in just six months."
In the first couple of months, you may find yourself changing diapers up to 10 times in 24 hours. Diapers should be changed whenever they are wet or soiled. Your baby will often (but not always) let you know. With a super-absorbent diaper like Pampers diapers, you can tell if it's wet by feeling for lumps in the absorbent material. Here are some common times for changing diapers:
The charity type agencies listed below receive donations of diapers (or the money to pay for them) from local businesses, civic groups, community businesses, schools and faith-based organizations. Free samples can also be provided to some clients. The goal is to help ensure children and their parents have diapers, wipes, and other personal cleaning supplies to ensure that the child is healthy. Find a listing of resources by state below.
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