Earlier this month, Procter & Gamble PG, +0.82%  Pampers’ parent company, announced this week that prices for Pampers products will increase by an average of 4%, though it depends on the size and type of diaper as well as the retailer. Target TGT, -2.09% sells a 100-count pack of Pampers Swaddlers diapers for $24.99, which, with the increase, would rise to almost $26.
Congratulations @givehealthjmh, and all other recent recipients of our #NoBabyUnhugged grant program: @ChildrensHealthcareofAtlanta, @ChildrensHospitalFoxValley, @PalmBeachChildrensHospital, @sanfordhealthfoundation, @StJohnsRegionalMedicalCenter, and @UMarylandChildrensHospital! Huggies is proud to support your volunteer hugger programs to share the Power of Hugs! ❤ Learn more or apply for a grant for your hospital at the Power of Hugs page on HuggiesHealthcare.com.
Luvs makes a much cheaper diaper and you get what you pay for. It’s a decent diaper, although not very well made. Coincidentally, Luvs and Pampers are both made by Procter & Gamble, Pampers being the premium brand and Luvs being the economy brand. If you’re on a tight budget, I would instead recommend a chlorine-free store brand, such as Target’s up & up, which runs about 13 cents per diaper.

There are resources available to you if you need them, though. Also, don't discount cloth diapers if you have the means to launder them. They're often easier to get at free or reduced cost, not to mention they're way better for the environment, and you can be super smug about that. (Unrelated, but once you're done diapering your baby, those diapers really make the best dusting cloths and glass cleaners.)
For the design-conscious, an awesome yet pricier diaper pail is the Ubbi Steel Diaper Pail (right). At $69, this sleek diaper pail comes in dozens of different colors, is made of odor-blocking steel, AND doesn’t require special bags–  it’s the top selling diaper pail on Amazon. If you have the money, the Ubbi is as good as it gets. And really? This is a worthwhile place to spend a little extra. If you have more than one kid, you could be using this for years.
Huggies Little Snugglers diapers are specially designed for gentle skin protection. With features like the pocketed-back waistband and GentleAbsorb liner that contain and draw the mess away, Little Snugglers help keep your baby?s delicate skin clean and healthy. Little Snugglers diapers also feature premium softness and breathability to help keep them comfortable. Little Snugglers diapers have double grip strips for a comfy fit that lasts, plus a wetness indicator that lets you know when it?s time for a change. In addition, Little Snugglers disposable diapers are fragrance-free, and feature NEW adorable Disney Baby Winnie the Pooh designs. Start your diaper-changing routine with Huggies Natural Care Wipes for a soft, gentle clean, then finish with Little Snugglers diapers. Join Huggies Rewards to earn points on all your Huggies purchases.
I noticed something different about these diapers, 1. was the character print which I liked. 2. was the quilted pattern on the inside of the diaper and 3. the blue strip liner. I also unfortunately noticed that these diapers consistently leaked at night. I at first thought that I hadn't pulled the side tabs snug enough but after having my baby waking up wet night after night I knew it was not user error but that these diapers suck. These diapers may absorb more but they leak out some of the moisture that they've absorbed. I have some of the older version of snug and dry left over that I use at night but these "new" version I will only use during the day. I also noticed that these new diapers cause itchiness on my sons private parts I have to apply a bit more diaper cream to prevent him from having irritation. I don't like these new diapers and wish I could get some sort of refund otherwise I may have to switch back to using pampers. They cost a tad bit more but pampers in this case is a better product. I have Huggies on amazon prime auto-shipment but will stop any future shipment.
In October 2008, "An updated lifecycle assessment study for disposable and reusable nappies" by the UK Environment Agency and Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs stated that reusable diapers can cause significantly less (up to 40 per cent) or significantly more damage to the environment than disposable ones, depending mostly on how parents wash and dry them. The "baseline scenario" showed that the difference in green-house emissions was insignificant (in fact, disposables even scored slightly better). However, much better results (emission cuts of up to 40 per cent) could be achieved by using reusable diapers more rationally. "The report shows that, in contrast to the use of disposable nappies, it is consumers' behaviour after purchase that determines most of the impacts from reusable nappies. Cloth nappy users can reduce their environmental impacts by:

Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]

Luvs makes a much cheaper diaper and you get what you pay for. It’s a decent diaper, although not very well made. Coincidentally, Luvs and Pampers are both made by Procter & Gamble, Pampers being the premium brand and Luvs being the economy brand. If you’re on a tight budget, I would instead recommend a chlorine-free store brand, such as Target’s up & up, which runs about 13 cents per diaper.
With our 1st child we relayed on swaddlers as much as possible. She was a skinny baby and they fit her around the lags and waist the best of all brands. We moved to another brand as she got older and more active because of the need for the extra fastening support none of the pampers have, but the swddlers always fit her the best and we had never had a blow out. Now on baby #2 and saddly this chunky child makes the waist fit a bit too tight. Swaddlers worked much better for our 1st child than it os for our second. Baby #2 has had the mesh liner stick to her when she her diapers comes off, it would not be so great to peel that off her if she had a rash. Sizing up makes the legs too big so we are using up our stock and moving to another brand for our 2nd baby. But for our 1st we still buy pampers when we can its just a hair more affordable. Overall swaddlers are a good diaper for a skinnier child than a chunky baby from my experience, i only wish they would find a way so the mesh didn't stick to your child as that happened all the time with both children.
Cost — A quick calculation: unless you are using a clean-at-home cloth diaper system, you will be spending *roughly* $40/month on diapers. Some diapers are cheaper, like store brands. Some are more expensive. You may decide, after getting pooped on multiple times, that a higher quality diaper is worth the extra money. Or maybe you’re into it (hard for me to say, we just met). According to Consumer Reports, the average family spends about $2,500 on diapers per child. If you opt for eco-friendly (more pricey) diapers –  good for you, btw –  that number is even higher: $3,500.

Ok, these diapers are getting 3 stars because they HAVE held in what they're supposed to hold in. However, I really hate the texture of the diapers. They are "plastic-y". I LOVE the Pampers Swaddlers because they are soft, almost fabric-feeling. I bought a huge box of the Baby Dry kind because they were a few bucks cheaper, and thank God we are almost out of this box because I hate the plastic texture of the diaper. I guess that's just personal preference since they seem to perform just fine, but I prefer to have a soft little baby butt when I hold my little one, not a squishy plastic butt!
As of 2018, name-brand, mid-range disposable diapers in the U.S., such as Huggies and Pampers, were sold at an average cost of approximately US $0.20 to $0.30 cents each, and their manufacturers earned about two cents in profit from each diaper sold.[44] Premium brands had eco-friendly features, and sold for approximately twice that price.[44] Generic disposable diapers cost less per diaper, at an average price of $0.15 cents each, and the typical manufacturer's profit was about one cent per diaper.[44] However, the low-cost diapers needed to be changed more frequently, so the total cost savings was limited, as the lower cost per diaper was offset by the need to buy more diapers.[44]
Don't get me wrong, I was exceedingly grateful for those things. Baby messes are something special, that's for sure. But between diapers, wipes, creams, ointments, new sheets and sleepers, stain remover, and sweat equity, the expense of it all is fairly extreme. It can put a heavy burden on families. No one should ever wonder how they're going to keep their baby clean in 2017, but here we are. In the United States, there is no government program available that pays for diapers. WIC and food stamps only cover nutrition, leaving families in the lurch when it comes to basics like diapers, wipes, and feminine hygiene products. In some states, they're even a taxable good, which seems to be just an insult to injury, but there you have it.
I used nothing but Pampers Swaddlers for my twin newborn babies 4 years ago and then switched to Pampers pull ups for them. None of the other brands compare to the comfort for your babies and children because they are so stretchy without any hard velcro-like corners on them like other brands. I was beyond excited when I found the Pampers Pure line for my most recent baby, 9 months now, because I try to buy everything as natural as possible. They’re super cute and better all the way around than any other diaper sold!
I was always a Pampers user with my first kid 4 years ago and just had my second. I was given Pampers again at the hospital when he was born and loved them again from the start. I love the wetness indicator so I know when to change him, they hold everything in well, and fit great. I'll keep relying only on Pampers for this baby like I did for my first!
If you can’t afford diapers right now, then I want to mention that there are loads of places that give out FREE Diapers to those in need. They are called “Diaper Banks” and they are on a mission to make up for the diaper “gap” in order for every baby to have clean diapers. If you have extra diapers, BabyCycle in St. Pete and HereWeGrow in Dunedin are both in desperate need of your diapers.
Things of My Very Own, Inc.-Crisis Intervention Center, 202 Front Street, Schenectady New York 12305, 518-630-5146. The capital region and down state are covered. So if you live in Albany or New York City you can call for information on diaper assistance programs. Thousands of working poor families with young babies get the free diapers they need from this NYC non-profit.
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