"We're passionate about helping all babies thrive, especially the smallest and most fragile. This Huggies diaper reflects our ongoing commitment to deliver innovative solutions for the NICU," said Eleonora Daireaux, Vice President, Huggies North America. "After hearing of the need for a diaper that meets the special requirements of these babies, our expert teams in skin science, research, product safety and manufacturing were inspired. Knowing every second counts for these babies, the team acted quickly to bring Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers from concept to launch in hospitals in just six months."

These early diapers were bulky, heavy products composed of fluff pulp with a rayon topsheet, polyethylene backsheet. In 1966, Pampers launched a 'wingfold' design and by 1969 started a "third size". By this time, Pampers had become a national brand in the United States.[citation needed] Procter and Gamble replaced the pin-on design with tapes in 1971. Toddler and Premature Infant sizes were also introduced. In 1973, P&G developed elasticized single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas to aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which had not been absorbed. In fact, the first patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper was in 1973 by P&G.[1] In 1982, Pampers introduced an elasticized wingfold diaper with elastic leg gathers and refastenable tapes which was a cross between the early 1960s design and the modern hourglass shape, a feature that was first introduced on Luvs in 1976 and evolved into an industry standard in 1985.[citation needed] In 1986, thin diapers made with absorbent gelling material were released. This made the average weight of a typical medium size diaper decrease by 50%.[2] In 1987, Pampers and Huggies both introduced frontal tape systems which allow repositioning of the lateral tape without tearing the diaper. In the 1990s Pampers introduced a thinner diaper known as Ultra Dry Thins.
Sometimes when you complete a baby registry you are often given free diapers and other coupons or freebies (like bottles or formula samples). I am not sure which stores offer what exactly, but most will offer you a discount on items left on your registry after your baby’s arrival (and that someone didn’t buy you), often including diapers and wipes! Target Baby Registry offers a free welcome gift for $60 worth of coupons and handpicked samples of their favorite brands. And Amazon Baby Registry‘s Welcome Box is valued at $35 and currently offers a package of baby wipes (among other items). See my full list of 5 Best Baby Registry Stores to see what other sites are offering.
These are my favorite diapers and a favorite among eco-moms. They are hypoallergenic, chlorine-free, affordable, and perform exceptionally well. IMO, these diapers are the best combo of eco-friendly and absorbent. All of that, and they cost about the same as Pampers or Huggies. Some users say they run smaller than these mainstream brands, just FYI.
Do you want free diaper samples, wipes, plus more free baby stuff? To save you time and money, I’ve created a list of 11 Free Diaper Resources below. Browse the list and click on the blue links of any offer(s) you’re interested in. You will be taken to a website to fill out a request form. Complete the form and then the manufacturer will mail the freebies to you. That’s it! 🙂
When you have a kid (or kids) in diapers, it can be absurd how fast those boxes get emptied. Many may be wondering if you can use food stamps to buy diapers, but unfortunately Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits can only be used to buy food items, according to the United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services.
There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
I called Enfamil and they told me that I should receive the samples around my due date. I also called Gerber they said the only thing they will do is send out email stating samples are available and you would have to proceed through the email. I will keep a watch out for this email. Gerber also mentioned they discontinued the nutrition pack about a year ago.
I agree to be a Huggies Club Member. By being a member, I agree that Kimberly-Clark Singapore Pte Ltd and its parent companies and related entities ("K-C") and K-C's agents may collect, use and store all the personal data provided for marketing, survey, promotional and research purposes, including sending you information about K-C products and promotions.
But honestly, cloth diapers, as I mentioned earlier, have the most robust free diaper programs and they're the easiest to access. Groups like Giving Diapers, Giving Hope and The Rebecca Foundation's Cloth Diaper Closet offer free cloth diapers to those in need. Alternatively, you can get free or very cheap cloth diapers from online forums like Diaper Swappers that specialize in recycled (highly laundered) cloth diapers. Change-Diapers.com is a great resource with a link every Friday for cloth diaper giveaways they've found online, too.
Cloth diapers are reusable and can be made from natural fibers, synthetic materials, or a combination of both.[21] They are often made from industrial cotton which may be bleached white or left the fiber's natural color. Other natural fiber cloth materials include wool, bamboo, and unbleached hemp. Man-made materials such as an internal absorbent layer of microfiber toweling or an external waterproof layer of polyurethane laminate (PUL) may be used. Polyester fleece and faux suedecloth are often used inside cloth diapers as a "stay-dry" wicking liner because of the non-absorbent properties of those synthetic fibers.
Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
×