My baby girl is allergic to every other diaper out there all we can use is pampers everything about the Daimler’s is great but I personally thought the fitting size was off my baby was breach and born via c section at 37 weeks she was only 7lbs 11oz and within one week of being home with weight lost mind you she weight 7lbs 2oz when we left the hospital and three days later went to first pediatrician appointment weighed 7lbs 5 oz her legs were getting cut up by the diapers!!! As soon as I saw this I immediately sent my husband to the store for size one and she was so small and the size 1 was so big she 2 1/2 months now and is 9lbs 13oz and she still fits in them. Overall the diapers are great everything about them but the fitting for new born sizes even my pediatrician said that she still should have fit in them she fir just right in the new born sized diapers they were just right fit not to big not to small and they cut her legs up so when we switched to size 1 she was so small in them she was swimming in the diaper.
Care for your baby's delicate skin from the very start with HUGGIES Natural Care Baby Wipes. Safe for sensitive skin, Natural Care Wipes contain 99% triple-filtered water for a pure, gentle clean. Plus, they are pH-balanced to help maintain your newborn's natural skin barrier and enriched with aloe and vitamin E to help keep skin healthy and conditioned. The #1 branded wipe*, HUGGIES Wipes are dermatologically tested and hypo-allergenic. In addition, Natural Care sensitive wipes are fragrance-free, alcohol-free and paraben-free, and they contain no phenoxyethanol or MIT. You can feel confident you're giving your baby a safe, gentle clean with every wipe. HUGGIES Natural Care moist wipes come in a wide variety of package sizes and styles, perfect for use at home and on the go: travel pack, flip-top pack, refill pack, reusable pop-up tub and the stylish Clutch 'N' Clean refillable travel pack. Don't get caught without wipes. Order online for convenient delivery right to your doorstep.
At the time the Pampers Size 6 were introduced, there was a debate between a pediatrician, T. Berry Brazelton, and syndicated columnist and best-selling author of books for parents, John Rosemond. The controversy was about the length of time a baby should wear diapers and when to start toilet training. Rosemond believes it is a "slap to the intelligence of a human being that one would allow baby to continue soiling and wetting him/herself past age 2."[20] While Rosemond concedes that Brazelton has been giving the same advice for decades, he criticized the pediatrician for serving as a consultant to Pampers, a division of Procter & Gamble, and for appearing in Pampers commercials.[21]
The environmental impact of cloth as compared to disposable diapers has been studied several times. In one cradle-to-grave study sponsored by the National Association of Diaper Services (NADS) and conducted by Carl Lehrburger and colleagues, results found that disposable diapers produce seven times more solid waste when discarded and three times more waste in the manufacturing process. In addition, effluents from the plastic, pulp, and paper industries are far more hazardous than those from the cotton-growing and -manufacturing processes. Single-use diapers consume less water than reusables laundered at home, but more than those sent to a commercial diaper service. Washing cloth diapers at home uses 50 to 70 gallons (approx. 189 to 264 litres) of water every three days, which is roughly equivalent to flushing the toilet 15 times a day, unless the user has a high-efficiency washing machine. An average diaper service puts its diapers through an average of 13 water changes, but uses less water and energy per diaper than one laundry load at home.[49]
There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
I called gerber today and they don’t send out the bags or do the nutrition kits. I called inquiring explaining I’m doing a home birth so instead there gonna send a pregnancy kit but that’s it. Enfamil is making the exception to send me the diaper bag they do for the hospitals since I’m having a home birth. Still have to call similac their closed so have to wait til Monday.

Sometimes when you complete a baby registry you are often given free diapers and other coupons or freebies (like bottles or formula samples). I am not sure which stores offer what exactly, but most will offer you a discount on items left on your registry after your baby’s arrival (and that someone didn’t buy you), often including diapers and wipes! Target Baby Registry offers a free welcome gift for $60 worth of coupons and handpicked samples of their favorite brands. And Amazon Baby Registry‘s Welcome Box is valued at $35 and currently offers a package of baby wipes (among other items). See my full list of 5 Best Baby Registry Stores to see what other sites are offering.
In March 2010, Pampers announced a change to their popular Cruisers and Swaddlers diapers with the addition of the new Dry-Max technology. Many parents reported[22] rashes and chemical burns as a result of using the new diapers. Procter & Gamble claim that pediatric experts have reviewed the Pampers with DryMax safety data and have seen no correlation between the reported rash and diaper.[23] In May 2010, a lawsuit was filed against Procter & Gamble based on the injuries allegedly caused by the diapers.[24] In September 2010, the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission issued the results of its investigation into the matter, finding no evidence that these diapers cause diaper rash.[25]
Wool pants, or, once available, rubber pants, were sometimes used over the cloth diaper to prevent leakage. Doctors believed that rubber pants were harmful because they thought the rubber acted as a poultice and damaged the skin of infants.[citation needed] The constant problem to be overcome was diaper rash, and the infection thereof. The concern was that lack of air circulation would worsen this condition. While lack of air circulation is a factor, it was later found that poor hygiene involving inefficiently washed diapers and infrequent changes of diapers, along with allowing the baby to lie for prolonged periods of time with fecal matter in contact with the skin, were the two main causes of these problems.[citation needed]

Some disposable diapers include fragrance, lotions or essential oils in order to help mask the scent of a soiled diaper, or to protect the skin. Care of disposable diapers is minimal, and primarily consists of keeping them in a dry place before use, with proper disposal in a garbage receptacle upon soiling. Stool is supposed to be deposited in the toilet, but is generally put in the garbage with the rest of the diaper.
Amazon – You can get a FREE Baby Welcome Box worth $35 when you create a baby registry at Amazon. One of my favorite things I received was a large package of sensitive baby wipes. The contents of the box varies, but you’ll definitely get some full-size baby products and lots of samples for Mom and Baby. This offer is available for Amazon Prime members. If you’re not a member yet, get a free 30 day trial here. As a member, you’ll save 20% off diapers and wipes, 20% off household items, and get FREE 2-day shipping so it’s definitely worth a try! Make sure to request your welcome box before your free trial ends. 😉 To be eligible for the free baby box, you’ll need to create a baby registry. For complete details, click here.
Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]

[Aside: Look, every time I throw a diaper in the trash can, I feel bad, okay? I am otherwise a very good citizen of the earth: I recycle and compost, I take mass transit every day instead of driving, I [used to] make baby food instead of buying it in the jar… but when it came to scooping poop from a diaper into the toilet, then washing a bunch of poop-stained diapers in the washing machine (for which I had to use COINS because we rented an apartment in the City), my head started to explode. I’m sorry, Mother Earth. I hope you’ll find it in your earthy heart to forgive me. I still love you.]


I like to use my diaper pail for pee diapers only. For the poopy diapers, buy rolls of Arm and Hammer diaper disposal bags (mentioned above). Put your poopy diapers in the little bag and simply throw it out every night (outside, like in the big garbage can). Is it a pain? Yeah, sort of, but it’s the only real way to keep your nursery from smelling like, well, shit. Or you can just put the poop diapers in there and deal with the smell. Your choice.
Cost — A quick calculation: unless you are using a clean-at-home cloth diaper system, you will be spending *roughly* $40/month on diapers. Some diapers are cheaper, like store brands. Some are more expensive. You may decide, after getting pooped on multiple times, that a higher quality diaper is worth the extra money. Or maybe you’re into it (hard for me to say, we just met). According to Consumer Reports, the average family spends about $2,500 on diapers per child. If you opt for eco-friendly (more pricey) diapers –  good for you, btw –  that number is even higher: $3,500.

Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]
The Diaper Bank of Greater Atlanta, 2774 North Cobb Pkwy. Ste. 109-353, Kennesaw, Georgia 30152, phone (404) 910-3242. Both Fulton County low income families and residents of metro Atlanta can receive assistance in the form of free diapers, baby wipes, referrals, and meals. There is also help for DeKalb County families. More free diapers in Atlanta.
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