I called Enfamil and they told me that I should receive the samples around my due date. I also called Gerber they said the only thing they will do is send out email stating samples are available and you would have to proceed through the email. I will keep a watch out for this email. Gerber also mentioned they discontinued the nutrition pack about a year ago.

The eco-factor — The sad truth is that 3.5 million tons of diapers end up in landfills every year. While cloth diapers don’t end up in the landfill, they do require lots of water and power to launder. Some say the carbon footprint of cloth and other eco diapers may not be that much less, in reality. (You can reduce the carbon footprint of cloth diapers by washing them in cold water and hanging them to dry.) What about disposable diapers? We recommend fragrance-free diapers, as toxic chemicals can be lumped in with a “fragrance” so they don’t have to be disclosed on the list of ingredients (due to “trade secret” laws). We also prefer chlorine-free diapers if they’re available to you.
Do you have a favorite brand that also makes diapers? I really like the dish soap from Seventh Generation, and they also have baby diapers. Sign up for their “Generation Good” club and you might get selected to receive product samples! Start noticing the companies you use that also make diapers, and reach out to them to see if you can try a sample from them!
For your other diaper changing needs, you'll find changing pads and disposable diaper bags that can have different scents. A variety of colors, sizes and styles of diaper bags can help simplify taking everything on the go. Soothe and cleanse your baby's skin with diaper rash cream, baby lotion and baby wipes. If you use cloth diapers, you can stock up on diaper liners. For different occasions and stages of development, there are training pants and swim diapers.
I normally do not write reviews. But this time I feel like I have to let other parents know what to expect with these diapers before going through the same negative experience I went through! The diapers are extremely thin. As soon as I put a diaper on my child, even if he does not pee for a while, the dry diaper becomes deformed and the cotton inside turns into clusters of cotton! As soon as my child pees even a little, the diaper automatically turns into a deformed diaper from the inside. The cotton inside breaks into a few clusters of cotton and if you dont change the diaper soon enough it will release all the urine onto your child's clothes. I was suprised to see that whether used or not, the diaper is very bad quality even if my child only has it on before it becomes a dirty diaper. I normally buy Luvs since they are less expensive and lock wetness pretty well. But they are not as popular as Huggies which was shocking to me. I guess ill be going back to other diapers. Please see attached an image where you can see transparently what happens with the diaper with just a very few use.
The Atlanta Community Food Bank provides free diapers in partnership with local charities and national businesses such as Pampers and Huggies Every Little Bottom Program assistance. Many of the cloth or disposable diapers distributed are available to low income because the box may have been damaged by the retailer, but the products themselves are in great condition. Some may refer to them as salvaged. Atlanta Georgia (404) 892-3333.

In 2018 the company launched its newest diaper line called Pampers Pure[6] which was designed without chlorine bleaching, fragrance, lotion, parabens, natural rubber latex and 26 allergens identified by the European Union. [7] The wipes launched with the new collection contain 99% water and premium cotton. Pampers announced that the goal was to give parents an option for an affordable natural diaper brand. [8]
Women and Children's Center of the Sierras, 3905 Neil Road, Suite 2, Reno Nevada 89509, (775) 825-7395. If you live in Las Vegas or the Clark County region, call this agency or use the following resource for referrals and additional information. Diapers, food stamps applications, and other support for pregnant mothers and low income parents is offered. Find diapers in Clark County and Las Vegas.
Luvs makes a much cheaper diaper and you get what you pay for. It’s a decent diaper, although not very well made. Coincidentally, Luvs and Pampers are both made by Procter & Gamble, Pampers being the premium brand and Luvs being the economy brand. If you’re on a tight budget, I would instead recommend a chlorine-free store brand, such as Target’s up & up, which runs about 13 cents per diaper.
Most hospitals will give you a free diaper bag when you deliver your baby. Call your local hospital before your due date to see if they participate. Some hospitals require that you print out a certificate and bring it with you to get your free diaper bag. Your OB/Gyn and Pediatrician are also great resources to get free baby stuff like free diapers, free baby bottles, baby formula samples, etc. Many times they’ll have plenty of baby samples on hand – just ask!

Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]
Baby diapers come in packages that contain anywhere from 12 to 160 diapers. This way, you can start by trying out smaller packages of different kinds and then stock up once you find your favorite. If you prefer cloth diapers, we carry different colors and sizes from brand gDiapers that are machine washable. You'll also find eco friendly diapers that are chlorine-free and sometimes plastic-free.
If you buy Huggies or Pampers diapers, both of them offer rewards for entering codes found on packages, or special promo codes you find online. You can also earn points for doing other things like watching their videos, leaving reviews, or reading their articles. Your points can add up over time and equal coupons for free diapers (or other rewards). Signup for Pampers Rewards HERE and/or the Huggies Rewards HERE.
In the first couple of months, you may find yourself changing diapers up to 10 times in 24 hours. Diapers should be changed whenever they are wet or soiled. Your baby will often (but not always) let you know. With a super-absorbent diaper like Pampers diapers, you can tell if it's wet by feeling for lumps in the absorbent material. Here are some common times for changing diapers:
At the time the Pampers Size 6 were introduced, there was a debate between a pediatrician, T. Berry Brazelton, and syndicated columnist and best-selling author of books for parents, John Rosemond. The controversy was about the length of time a baby should wear diapers and when to start toilet training. Rosemond believes it is a "slap to the intelligence of a human being that one would allow baby to continue soiling and wetting him/herself past age 2."[20] While Rosemond concedes that Brazelton has been giving the same advice for decades, he criticized the pediatrician for serving as a consultant to Pampers, a division of Procter & Gamble, and for appearing in Pampers commercials.[21]

There are resources available to you if you need them, though. Also, don't discount cloth diapers if you have the means to launder them. They're often easier to get at free or reduced cost, not to mention they're way better for the environment, and you can be super smug about that. (Unrelated, but once you're done diapering your baby, those diapers really make the best dusting cloths and glass cleaners.)
A diaper bank known as Happy Bottoms serves people in the Kansas City area. The organization is a partnership of Cornerstones of Care and Healthy Families of Kansas City. The goal is to coordinate free diaper drives that will then go ahead and support local agencies serving low income families in the community. They also offer information on WIC and government benefits. Provides free diapers to Kansas City area agencies and social service groups.
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