I once calculated how much I'd spent in diapers between my children. The price was staggering. In the beginning, I bought the crunchiest disposable diapers available. After that messy lesson, I switched to a popular brand that cost nearly as much. I never really thought about what I would do if I couldn't pay for them, but where can you get free diapers for your baby? It makes sense to wonder — it cost me thousands of dollars to hold my baby's crap.
The Diaper Bank receives donations from local businesses and from charity run diaper drives. They can proceed to offer free diapers to poor and low income families through existing local charities and service providers in Connecticut. The agency works with daycare centers, local food pantries, soup kitchens, community action agencies, social service agencies and local shelters. New Haven Connecticut. Call (203) 934-7009
Do you have a favorite brand that also makes diapers? I really like the dish soap from Seventh Generation, and they also have baby diapers. Sign up for their “Generation Good” club and you might get selected to receive product samples! Start noticing the companies you use that also make diapers, and reach out to them to see if you can try a sample from them!
These early diapers were bulky, heavy products composed of fluff pulp with a rayon topsheet, polyethylene backsheet. In 1966, Pampers launched a 'wingfold' design and by 1969 started a "third size". By this time, Pampers had become a national brand in the United States.[citation needed] Procter and Gamble replaced the pin-on design with tapes in 1971. Toddler and Premature Infant sizes were also introduced. In 1973, P&G developed elasticized single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas to aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which had not been absorbed. In fact, the first patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper was in 1973 by P&G.[1] In 1982, Pampers introduced an elasticized wingfold diaper with elastic leg gathers and refastenable tapes which was a cross between the early 1960s design and the modern hourglass shape, a feature that was first introduced on Luvs in 1976 and evolved into an industry standard in 1985.[citation needed] In 1986, thin diapers made with absorbent gelling material were released. This made the average weight of a typical medium size diaper decrease by 50%.[2] In 1987, Pampers and Huggies both introduced frontal tape systems which allow repositioning of the lateral tape without tearing the diaper. In the 1990s Pampers introduced a thinner diaper known as Ultra Dry Thins.

Don't get me wrong, I was exceedingly grateful for those things. Baby messes are something special, that's for sure. But between diapers, wipes, creams, ointments, new sheets and sleepers, stain remover, and sweat equity, the expense of it all is fairly extreme. It can put a heavy burden on families. No one should ever wonder how they're going to keep their baby clean in 2017, but here we are. In the United States, there is no government program available that pays for diapers. WIC and food stamps only cover nutrition, leaving families in the lurch when it comes to basics like diapers, wipes, and feminine hygiene products. In some states, they're even a taxable good, which seems to be just an insult to injury, but there you have it.
In the 19th century, the modern diaper began to take shape and mothers in many parts of the world used cotton material, held in place with a fastening—eventually the safety pin. Cloth diapers in the United States were first mass-produced in 1887 by Maria Allen. In the UK, nappies were made out of terry towelling, often with an inner lining made out of soft muslin.

Don't get me wrong, I was exceedingly grateful for those things. Baby messes are something special, that's for sure. But between diapers, wipes, creams, ointments, new sheets and sleepers, stain remover, and sweat equity, the expense of it all is fairly extreme. It can put a heavy burden on families. No one should ever wonder how they're going to keep their baby clean in 2017, but here we are. In the United States, there is no government program available that pays for diapers. WIC and food stamps only cover nutrition, leaving families in the lurch when it comes to basics like diapers, wipes, and feminine hygiene products. In some states, they're even a taxable good, which seems to be just an insult to injury, but there you have it.


Ok, these diapers are getting 3 stars because they HAVE held in what they're supposed to hold in. However, I really hate the texture of the diapers. They are "plastic-y". I LOVE the Pampers Swaddlers because they are soft, almost fabric-feeling. I bought a huge box of the Baby Dry kind because they were a few bucks cheaper, and thank God we are almost out of this box because I hate the plastic texture of the diaper. I guess that's just personal preference since they seem to perform just fine, but I prefer to have a soft little baby butt when I hold my little one, not a squishy plastic butt!
Did you know that when you sign up for a free magazine it puts your name on a list that says that you probably have young children? And you know who would like to send you promotional items (and maybe coupons) because you have small children? Diaper companies! Diaper companies buy marketing lists so that they can send you advertisements to win you over. Plus, lots of times the FREE Magazine Subscriptions I receive come with bonus coupons inside! Randomly I will see Huggies, Pampers or Luvs coupons.
Sometimes when you complete a baby registry you are often given free diapers and other coupons or freebies (like bottles or formula samples). I am not sure which stores offer what exactly, but most will offer you a discount on items left on your registry after your baby’s arrival (and that someone didn’t buy you), often including diapers and wipes! Target Baby Registry offers a free welcome gift for $60 worth of coupons and handpicked samples of their favorite brands. And Amazon Baby Registry‘s Welcome Box is valued at $35 and currently offers a package of baby wipes (among other items). See my full list of 5 Best Baby Registry Stores to see what other sites are offering.
There are resources available to you if you need them, though. Also, don't discount cloth diapers if you have the means to launder them. They're often easier to get at free or reduced cost, not to mention they're way better for the environment, and you can be super smug about that. (Unrelated, but once you're done diapering your baby, those diapers really make the best dusting cloths and glass cleaners.)
Target – Did you know you can get this awesome gift bag filled with free baby stuff when you create a Target Baby Registry? The picture above shows what I got; free diaper samples, wipes, bottles, pacifiers, coupons, plus much more. To see a detailed list of what came in my Target gift bag, click here. To get your free gift, just create a baby registry online. You’ll get an email from Target explaining how to pick up your gift bag at a Target store. This is a limited supply offer, so make sure to get yours today! 🙂
In the hospital, Pampers Swaddlers will (probably) be the first diaper to hit your baby’s bottom. I am very happy with the performance of Pampers; they are soft, fit well, and contain leaks. Pampers Swaddlers are incredibly soft and have an umbilical cord notch for newbies. They also have a line that changes color to indicate wetness (Swaddlers also come in a Sensitive version).
The charity type agencies listed below receive donations of diapers (or the money to pay for them) from local businesses, civic groups, community businesses, schools and faith-based organizations. Free samples can also be provided to some clients. The goal is to help ensure children and their parents have diapers, wipes, and other personal cleaning supplies to ensure that the child is healthy. Find a listing of resources by state below.
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