Before I dive into some of the awesome ways you can access free diapers, I think it's important to acknowledge that we're a diverse community of mamas here, and all of our needs are different. While every parent in the world could appreciate free diapers now and then, many moms are dealing with financial hardships that make the prospect of getting free diapers essential. One in three American families do not have enough diapers to keep their baby clean, dry and healthy, according to the National Diaper Bank Network.
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The only thing you get is some coupons and sample packs of infant formula from enfamil. Oh, and a bunch of spam emails from the companies they sell your email address too. Not worth the hundreds of questions you have to answer and other offers you have to sign up for. Your hospital will give you a bag with a can of formula and sometimes coupons from some companies they use (Johnson and Johnson) and that’s about it. When I had my daughter in December all I got was a bag and my nurses were wonderful and gave us extra diapers, wipes, wash and lotion but it came from the hospitals stash and nothing that Gerber gives to them to give each new mom like they did in 20012 and 2005 when I had my other kids.

The environmental impact of cloth as compared to disposable diapers has been studied several times. In one cradle-to-grave study sponsored by the National Association of Diaper Services (NADS) and conducted by Carl Lehrburger and colleagues, results found that disposable diapers produce seven times more solid waste when discarded and three times more waste in the manufacturing process. In addition, effluents from the plastic, pulp, and paper industries are far more hazardous than those from the cotton-growing and -manufacturing processes. Single-use diapers consume less water than reusables laundered at home, but more than those sent to a commercial diaper service. Washing cloth diapers at home uses 50 to 70 gallons (approx. 189 to 264 litres) of water every three days, which is roughly equivalent to flushing the toilet 15 times a day, unless the user has a high-efficiency washing machine. An average diaper service puts its diapers through an average of 13 water changes, but uses less water and energy per diaper than one laundry load at home.[49]
If you can’t afford diapers right now, then I want to mention that there are loads of places that give out FREE Diapers to those in need. They are called “Diaper Banks” and they are on a mission to make up for the diaper “gap” in order for every baby to have clean diapers. If you have extra diapers, BabyCycle in St. Pete and HereWeGrow in Dunedin are both in desperate need of your diapers.
San Francisco, San Mateo, San Jose, and Bay area California - The goal of the Bay Area Diaper Bank and other local groups is to distribute free diapers to agencies throughout northern California that serve mothers and children in need. Thousands of families take advantage of the assistance program every month. Find resources in San Francisco and San Mateo County.
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