In the first couple of months, you may find yourself changing diapers up to 10 times in 24 hours. Diapers should be changed whenever they are wet or soiled. Your baby will often (but not always) let you know. With a super-absorbent diaper like Pampers diapers, you can tell if it's wet by feeling for lumps in the absorbent material. Here are some common times for changing diapers:
You’ll also need 2 or 3 changing pad covers (roughly $10 a piece). They get soiled pretty quickly so you’ll need more than one. On top of the changing pad cover, you will also need a whole bunch of waterproof pads (the white pad) as an added layer of protection — these are much easier to wash than the covers, and run $13 for a 3 pack. Get a whole bunch; you’ll be washing them all the time.
Cloth diapers are reusable and can be made from natural fibers, synthetic materials, or a combination of both.[21] They are often made from industrial cotton which may be bleached white or left the fiber's natural color. Other natural fiber cloth materials include wool, bamboo, and unbleached hemp. Man-made materials such as an internal absorbent layer of microfiber toweling or an external waterproof layer of polyurethane laminate (PUL) may be used. Polyester fleece and faux suedecloth are often used inside cloth diapers as a "stay-dry" wicking liner because of the non-absorbent properties of those synthetic fibers.
Huggies Rewards follows the same model — download the app, earn points (here, you do get 500 just for signing up), and then shop the Huggies rewards marketplace. Again, it requires a heck of a lot of diaper purchases to accumulate enough points to get a free pack, but Huggies does offer additional ways to earn points — like participating in surveys, sharing on social media, and reading articles.
We have two kiddos and have always been loyal to Pampers diapers. We loved their super soft design and their adorable characters that we know and love. Recently that all changed. The diapers are far less soft and are prone to leakage. As soon as they are wet, the diapers smell immediately. We are so disappointed with the new design and changes recently made. Hoping Pampers will consider returning to their old quality standards so we can continue to be loyal customers. ☹️

All those diaper expenses add up. In its first year, a baby can go through 2,500 to 3,000 diapers, costing parents between $500 and $1,000, said Jen Dicks Burg, blogger at the The Suburban Mom and mother to three girls. BabyCenter, an online media company for parents and expectant parents, estimates that disposable diapers cost $72 per month for the first year (or $864 a year), based on a survey of more than 1,000 new moms.
In the first couple of months, you may find yourself changing diapers up to 10 times in 24 hours. Diapers should be changed whenever they are wet or soiled. Your baby will often (but not always) let you know. With a super-absorbent diaper like Pampers diapers, you can tell if it's wet by feeling for lumps in the absorbent material. Here are some common times for changing diapers:
Did you know that when you sign up for a free magazine it puts your name on a list that says that you probably have young children? And you know who would like to send you promotional items (and maybe coupons) because you have small children? Diaper companies! Diaper companies buy marketing lists so that they can send you advertisements to win you over. Plus, lots of times the FREE Magazine Subscriptions I receive come with bonus coupons inside! Randomly I will see Huggies, Pampers or Luvs coupons.
First Coast Women's Services. The mailing address is 11215 San Jose Boulevard, Jacksonville, Florida 32223. The non-profit supports lower income women in Duval County. Diapers, referrals, and other aid is provided to those that qualify. Call (904) 262-6300, or try another non-profit known as Emergency Pregnancy Services at (904) 308-7510. More diaper programs in Duval County.
Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
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