Many of these groups work with companies such as Huggies and their Every Little Bottom program. They may also have partnerships in place with Pampers and other diaper manufacturers so that samples can be given out to parents that request them. These are just a few of the non-profits and charities that distribute free diapers, but each state will also have clothing closets that can be contacted.

For more than 50 years, parents have trusted Pampers to care for their babies. Pampers is a part of The Procter & Gamble Company (NYSE:PG) and is the #1-selling diaper worldwide. Every day, more than 25 million babies in 100 countries around the world wear Pampers. Pampers offers a complete range of diapers, wipes and training pants designed to provide protection and comfort for every stage of baby’s development. Visit www.pampers.com to learn more about Pampers products, join the Pampers Rewards program, and find ideas and information to help your baby get the most out of love, sleep and play.
Did you know Diaper Companies want your used diapers? Yes! And they pay around $100 for 4 hours of your time just to have your babies wet in them. Google (or do a search on Facebook) Diaper Study Market Research {and your city state} and you’ll find several companies to sign up and work with. Her are a couple I found to get you started: Nieto Research Diaper Studies  Focus Pointe Global Marketing Research Company
CINCINNATI--(BUSINESS WIRE)--This Father’s Day, Pampers partnered with multi-Grammy award-winning musician and dad, John Legend, to celebrate all the ways dads make every moment special, including changing diapers. From tickles and giggles to singing songs, Pampers recognizes it is in these everyday routines that the best baby bonding moments happen.

Baby diapers come in packages that contain anywhere from 12 to 160 diapers. This way, you can start by trying out smaller packages of different kinds and then stock up once you find your favorite. If you prefer cloth diapers, we carry different colors and sizes from brand gDiapers that are machine washable. You'll also find eco friendly diapers that are chlorine-free and sometimes plastic-free.
These early diapers were bulky, heavy products composed of fluff pulp with a rayon topsheet, polyethylene backsheet. In 1966, Pampers launched a 'wingfold' design and by 1969 started a "third size". By this time, Pampers had become a national brand in the United States.[citation needed] Procter and Gamble replaced the pin-on design with tapes in 1971. Toddler and Premature Infant sizes were also introduced. In 1973, P&G developed elasticized single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas to aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which had not been absorbed. In fact, the first patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper was in 1973 by P&G.[1] In 1982, Pampers introduced an elasticized wingfold diaper with elastic leg gathers and refastenable tapes which was a cross between the early 1960s design and the modern hourglass shape, a feature that was first introduced on Luvs in 1976 and evolved into an industry standard in 1985.[citation needed] In 1986, thin diapers made with absorbent gelling material were released. This made the average weight of a typical medium size diaper decrease by 50%.[2] In 1987, Pampers and Huggies both introduced frontal tape systems which allow repositioning of the lateral tape without tearing the diaper. In the 1990s Pampers introduced a thinner diaper known as Ultra Dry Thins.
John’s wife, Chrissy Teigen, officially joined the Pampers family in March as the Creative Consultant for Pampers Pure. Made with premium cotton and other thoughtfully selected materials, stylish prints and 100% Pampers protection, the Pampers Pure Collection is a new choice for parents searching for diaper and wipe options in the “natural” category who don’t want to sacrifice performance.

Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
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