With our 1st child we relayed on swaddlers as much as possible. She was a skinny baby and they fit her around the lags and waist the best of all brands. We moved to another brand as she got older and more active because of the need for the extra fastening support none of the pampers have, but the swddlers always fit her the best and we had never had a blow out. Now on baby #2 and saddly this chunky child makes the waist fit a bit too tight. Swaddlers worked much better for our 1st child than it os for our second. Baby #2 has had the mesh liner stick to her when she her diapers comes off, it would not be so great to peel that off her if she had a rash. Sizing up makes the legs too big so we are using up our stock and moving to another brand for our 2nd baby. But for our 1st we still buy pampers when we can its just a hair more affordable. Overall swaddlers are a good diaper for a skinnier child than a chunky baby from my experience, i only wish they would find a way so the mesh didn't stick to your child as that happened all the time with both children.
Most hospitals will give you a free diaper bag when you deliver your baby. Call your local hospital before your due date to see if they participate. Some hospitals require that you print out a certificate and bring it with you to get your free diaper bag. Your OB/Gyn and Pediatrician are also great resources to get free baby stuff like free diapers, free baby bottles, baby formula samples, etc. Many times they’ll have plenty of baby samples on hand – just ask!
Congratulations @givehealthjmh, and all other recent recipients of our #NoBabyUnhugged grant program: @ChildrensHealthcareofAtlanta, @ChildrensHospitalFoxValley, @PalmBeachChildrensHospital, @sanfordhealthfoundation, @StJohnsRegionalMedicalCenter, and @UMarylandChildrensHospital! Huggies is proud to support your volunteer hugger programs to share the Power of Hugs! ❤ Learn more or apply for a grant for your hospital at the Power of Hugs page on HuggiesHealthcare.com.
In addition to the other two baby Registries, Babies R Us will PAY YOU 10% in reward dollars for anything purchased on your registry! WHAT?! Yes, that means you can use the money (via a gift card) to buy more items (aka get Diapers for FREE!), and remember, Babies R Us (or Toys R Us) take coupons. And, you can also use a manufacturer coupon on those diapers to get even more for your money!
Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]
Some disposable diapers include fragrance, lotions or essential oils in order to help mask the scent of a soiled diaper, or to protect the skin. Care of disposable diapers is minimal, and primarily consists of keeping them in a dry place before use, with proper disposal in a garbage receptacle upon soiling. Stool is supposed to be deposited in the toilet, but is generally put in the garbage with the rest of the diaper.
I used nothing but Pampers Swaddlers for my twin newborn babies 4 years ago and then switched to Pampers pull ups for them. None of the other brands compare to the comfort for your babies and children because they are so stretchy without any hard velcro-like corners on them like other brands. I was beyond excited when I found the Pampers Pure line for my most recent baby, 9 months now, because I try to buy everything as natural as possible. They’re super cute and better all the way around than any other diaper sold!
Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]
The early 1990s also saw the introduction of gender-specific diapers in the Pampers brand; the product returned to unisex diapers towards the end of the decade. In 1993, Pampers introduced training pants, but the Pampers Trainers were a short lived product. Pampers did not sell training pants again until the introduction of Easy Up.[3] In 1996, P&G acquired Baby Fresh wipes from Kimberly-Clark; Kimberly-Clark had recently acquired Baby Fresh owner Scott Paper Company and was ordered to sell the wipes business.[4] In 1998, Procter & Gamble introduced its largest diaper at the time, Pampers Baby-Dry Size 6. It was promoted in an advertising campaign featuring pediatrician and child development expert Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, who said to let the child decide when the time is right to potty train. The size 6 diapers were billed for growing toddlers. Huggies also introduced a size 6 diaper at this time.[5]
Create your Baby Registry online and then stop by the Guest Service desk at any Target store to receive $50 worth of great samples and coupons. Not only is it easy for guests to use this registry, but that’ll put your name on the Target mailing list for great baby saving coupons in the future which you can stack with other coupons to help get Free or Cheap Diapers.

In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]
San Francisco, San Mateo, San Jose, and Bay area California - The goal of the Bay Area Diaper Bank and other local groups is to distribute free diapers to agencies throughout northern California that serve mothers and children in need. Thousands of families take advantage of the assistance program every month. Find resources in San Francisco and San Mateo County.
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