Sometimes, a written letter or email telling a diaper company about your baby’s birth (especially if you have multiples) asking for a product to sample can result in some free diapers. I wouldn’t really recommend going the “sob story” route too strong, but companies want to know you, their customer. If you ever have faulty diapers, be sure to contact them as most have a guarantee and will replace your defective diapers for free.
Do you want free diaper samples, wipes, plus more free baby stuff? To save you time and money, I’ve created a list of 11 Free Diaper Resources below. Browse the list and click on the blue links of any offer(s) you’re interested in. You will be taken to a website to fill out a request form. Complete the form and then the manufacturer will mail the freebies to you. That’s it! 🙂
All those diaper expenses add up. In its first year, a baby can go through 2,500 to 3,000 diapers, costing parents between $500 and $1,000, said Jen Dicks Burg, blogger at the The Suburban Mom and mother to three girls. BabyCenter, an online media company for parents and expectant parents, estimates that disposable diapers cost $72 per month for the first year (or $864 a year), based on a survey of more than 1,000 new moms.
For more than 50 years, parents have trusted Pampers to care for their babies. Pampers is a part of The Procter & Gamble Company (NYSE:PG) and is the #1-selling diaper worldwide. Every day, more than 25 million babies in 100 countries around the world wear Pampers. Pampers offers a complete range of diapers, wipes and training pants designed to provide protection and comfort for every stage of baby’s development. Visit www.pampers.com to learn more about Pampers products, join the Pampers Rewards program, and find ideas and information to help your baby get the most out of love, sleep and play.

At the time the Pampers Size 6 were introduced, there was a debate between a pediatrician, T. Berry Brazelton, and syndicated columnist and best-selling author of books for parents, John Rosemond. The controversy was about the length of time a baby should wear diapers and when to start toilet training. Rosemond believes it is a "slap to the intelligence of a human being that one would allow baby to continue soiling and wetting him/herself past age 2."[20] While Rosemond concedes that Brazelton has been giving the same advice for decades, he criticized the pediatrician for serving as a consultant to Pampers, a division of Procter & Gamble, and for appearing in Pampers commercials.[21]
Huggies Rewards follows the same model — download the app, earn points (here, you do get 500 just for signing up), and then shop the Huggies rewards marketplace. Again, it requires a heck of a lot of diaper purchases to accumulate enough points to get a free pack, but Huggies does offer additional ways to earn points — like participating in surveys, sharing on social media, and reading articles.
All those diaper expenses add up. In its first year, a baby can go through 2,500 to 3,000 diapers, costing parents between $500 and $1,000, said Jen Dicks Burg, blogger at the The Suburban Mom and mother to three girls. BabyCenter, an online media company for parents and expectant parents, estimates that disposable diapers cost $72 per month for the first year (or $864 a year), based on a survey of more than 1,000 new moms.
Wrap your baby in Pampers Swaddlers diapers, the most trusted comfort and protection and the #1 Choice of US Hospitals. The Blankie Soft diaper with a unique Absorb Away Liner pulls wetness and mess away from baby's skin to help keep your baby comfortable. It also has a color-changing wetness indicator that tells you when your baby might need a change.
Usually I don't like store brand diapers I've been accustomed to buying huggies, pampers, or sometimes luvs. On occasion when there's sales or I'm on the go and on my last diaper I've tried a few store brands that were horrible quality. Thanks to this sample I now know that walgreens well beginnings diapers are awesome, I will definitely keep purchasing these!

Diapers are primarily worn by infants, toddlers who are not yet potty trained, and by children who experience bedwetting. They are also used by adults with incontinence, in certain circumstances where access to a toilet is unavailable or for psychological reasons. These can include those of advanced age, patients bed-bound in a hospital, individuals with certain types of physical or mental disability, diaper fetishists, and people working in extreme conditions, such as astronauts. It is not uncommon for people to wear diapers under dry suits.


Sometimes when you complete a baby registry you are often given free diapers and other coupons or freebies (like bottles or formula samples). I am not sure which stores offer what exactly, but most will offer you a discount on items left on your registry after your baby’s arrival (and that someone didn’t buy you), often including diapers and wipes! Target Baby Registry offers a free welcome gift for $60 worth of coupons and handpicked samples of their favorite brands. And Amazon Baby Registry‘s Welcome Box is valued at $35 and currently offers a package of baby wipes (among other items). See my full list of 5 Best Baby Registry Stores to see what other sites are offering.
Cost — A quick calculation: unless you are using a clean-at-home cloth diaper system, you will be spending *roughly* $40/month on diapers. Some diapers are cheaper, like store brands. Some are more expensive. You may decide, after getting pooped on multiple times, that a higher quality diaper is worth the extra money. Or maybe you’re into it (hard for me to say, we just met). According to Consumer Reports, the average family spends about $2,500 on diapers per child. If you opt for eco-friendly (more pricey) diapers –  good for you, btw –  that number is even higher: $3,500.
Modern cloth diapers come in a host of shapes, including preformed cloth diapers, all-in-one diapers with waterproof exteriors, fitted diaper with covers and pocket or "stuffable" diapers, which consist of a water-resistant outer shell sewn with an opening for insertion of absorbent material inserts.[22] Many design features of modern cloth diapers have followed directly from innovations initially developed in disposable diapers, such as the use of the hour glass shape, materials to separate moisture from skin and the use of double gussets, or an inner elastic band for better fit and containment of waste material.[21] Several cloth diaper brands use variations of Procter & Gamble's original 1973 patent use of a double gusset in Pampers.[13]
All those diaper expenses add up. In its first year, a baby can go through 2,500 to 3,000 diapers, costing parents between $500 and $1,000, said Jen Dicks Burg, blogger at the The Suburban Mom and mother to three girls. BabyCenter, an online media company for parents and expectant parents, estimates that disposable diapers cost $72 per month for the first year (or $864 a year), based on a survey of more than 1,000 new moms.

In the 20th century, the disposable diaper was conceived. In the 1930s, Robinsons of Chesterfield had what were labeled "Destroyable Babies Napkins" listed in their catalogue for the wholesale market.[5] In 1944, Hugo Drangel of the Swedish paper company Pauliström suggested a conceptual design which would entail the placing of sheets of paper tissue (cellulose wadding) inside the cloth diaper and rubber pants. However, cellulose wadding was rough against the skin and crumbled into balls when exposed to moisture.
For the design-conscious, an awesome yet pricier diaper pail is the Ubbi Steel Diaper Pail (right). At $69, this sleek diaper pail comes in dozens of different colors, is made of odor-blocking steel, AND doesn’t require special bags–  it’s the top selling diaper pail on Amazon. If you have the money, the Ubbi is as good as it gets. And really? This is a worthwhile place to spend a little extra. If you have more than one kid, you could be using this for years.
In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]
*Ad dates and offers vary by market. mPerks offers good with mPerks digital coupon(s). See coupon(s) for terms. Buy one, get one (BOGO) promotional items must be of equal or lesser value. Special pricing and offers are good only while supplies last. No rainchecks or substitutions unless otherwise stated. Buy/save offers must be purchased in a single transaction; no cash back. Other conditions and/or exclusions may apply. Meijer.com reserves the right to limit quantities (including after you've submitted your order).

Another favorite is the Munchkin Step Diaper Pail ($64), which wins the odor control contest. This pail requires special bags and uses a baking soda dispenser (which you also have to refill) to control odor. It does require a bit of diaper-squishing, but not nearly as much as the Diaper Genie. If odor control is a top priority and you don’t mind buying special bags, this is your go-to.
Boy or girl — Boys tend to pee more in the front of their diaper, and for girls, pee tends to collect in the middle and back. Boys often have leaky pee pee diapers because their little weenies point in a certain direction and they pee with direction and…force (ever seen a girl write her name in the snow? Didn’t think so). For boys, getting a snug fit around the thighs matters a lot.
Children may have problems with bladder control (primarily at night), until eight years or older, and may wear diapers while sleeping to control bedwetting.[31] The Children's Health and Wellness website claims that diapering a child can prolong bedwetting, as it sends a "message of permission" to urinate in their sleep.[32] Dr Anthony Page of the Creative Child Online Magazine claims that children can get used to their diapers and begin to view them as a comfort, and that of the children surveyed, most would rather wear diapers than worry about getting up at night to go to the toilet.[33] In a series of online surveys, Robert A Pretlow, MD, of eHealth International, Inc., cites an identical figure. He argues that if Internet users are representative of society as a whole, these surveys imply that a fetishistic or emotional attraction to diapers may be responsible for these "comfort" cases, and that "these behaviors are a significant cause of enuresis and incontinence." He called for further studies to be done on the topic.[34]
My baby girl is allergic to every other diaper out there all we can use is pampers everything about the Daimler’s is great but I personally thought the fitting size was off my baby was breach and born via c section at 37 weeks she was only 7lbs 11oz and within one week of being home with weight lost mind you she weight 7lbs 2oz when we left the hospital and three days later went to first pediatrician appointment weighed 7lbs 5 oz her legs were getting cut up by the diapers!!! As soon as I saw this I immediately sent my husband to the store for size one and she was so small and the size 1 was so big she 2 1/2 months now and is 9lbs 13oz and she still fits in them. Overall the diapers are great everything about them but the fitting for new born sizes even my pediatrician said that she still should have fit in them she fir just right in the new born sized diapers they were just right fit not to big not to small and they cut her legs up so when we switched to size 1 she was so small in them she was swimming in the diaper.
With Pampers Rewards, you need to download an app to scan in the in-pack codes. I did it and it's actually super easy. You get 100 points for signing up, 50 more when you scan in your first code. The one hitch is that while Pampers Rewards has loads of stuff you can get with relatively few points, it actually takes a lot of freaking points to earn a pack of free diapers. I did the math, and it would take 16 purchases of 166-count Pamper Swaddlers Size 4s to earn the 2100 points required to get a free pack. Now that's a lot, but also, you're going to buy the 16 packs anyway, so you may as well get one for free.
Did you know Diaper Companies want your used diapers? Yes! And they pay around $100 for 4 hours of your time just to have your babies wet in them. Google (or do a search on Facebook) Diaper Study Market Research {and your city state} and you’ll find several companies to sign up and work with. Her are a couple I found to get you started: Nieto Research Diaper Studies  Focus Pointe Global Marketing Research Company
The process to create Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers included intensive research and design optimization, as well as interviews with nurses and neonatal therapists to ensure the design provided optimal fit for healthy growth and development. The diaper features gentle, specially-sized fasteners and a narrow, absorbent pad to provide a flexible fit so that baby can be comfortably positioned in a fetal tuck, with arms and legs close to the body. The soft, smooth liner and gentle leg gathers offer leakage protection without irritating fragile, underdeveloped skin.
Create your Baby Registry online and then stop by the Guest Service desk at any Target store to receive $50 worth of great samples and coupons. Not only is it easy for guests to use this registry, but that’ll put your name on the Target mailing list for great baby saving coupons in the future which you can stack with other coupons to help get Free or Cheap Diapers.
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