The Diaper Bank of Greater Atlanta, 2774 North Cobb Pkwy. Ste. 109-353, Kennesaw, Georgia 30152, phone (404) 910-3242. Both Fulton County low income families and residents of metro Atlanta can receive assistance in the form of free diapers, baby wipes, referrals, and meals. There is also help for DeKalb County families. More free diapers in Atlanta.
If you’re spending that much, and you’re in the market for something with a few more bells and whistles, I also like the Hatch Baby Grow ($129), an integrated baby scale and changing pad in one. The scale allows you to track weight gain, milk intake and other such things that are typically only ascertained by a visit to a pediatrician’s office. I would especially recommend this for parents who are the “need to know” type (those who like to have lots of data) or if you have any reason to expect a preemie (you are pregnant with multiples, high risk, etc.).

The Atlanta Community Food Bank provides free diapers in partnership with local charities and national businesses such as Pampers and Huggies Every Little Bottom Program assistance. Many of the cloth or disposable diapers distributed are available to low income because the box may have been damaged by the retailer, but the products themselves are in great condition. Some may refer to them as salvaged. Atlanta Georgia (404) 892-3333.
There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
If you’re spending that much, and you’re in the market for something with a few more bells and whistles, I also like the Hatch Baby Grow ($129), an integrated baby scale and changing pad in one. The scale allows you to track weight gain, milk intake and other such things that are typically only ascertained by a visit to a pediatrician’s office. I would especially recommend this for parents who are the “need to know” type (those who like to have lots of data) or if you have any reason to expect a preemie (you are pregnant with multiples, high risk, etc.).
[Aside: Look, every time I throw a diaper in the trash can, I feel bad, okay? I am otherwise a very good citizen of the earth: I recycle and compost, I take mass transit every day instead of driving, I [used to] make baby food instead of buying it in the jar… but when it came to scooping poop from a diaper into the toilet, then washing a bunch of poop-stained diapers in the washing machine (for which I had to use COINS because we rented an apartment in the City), my head started to explode. I’m sorry, Mother Earth. I hope you’ll find it in your earthy heart to forgive me. I still love you.]
As of 2018, name-brand, mid-range disposable diapers in the U.S., such as Huggies and Pampers, were sold at an average cost of approximately US $0.20 to $0.30 cents each, and their manufacturers earned about two cents in profit from each diaper sold.[44] Premium brands had eco-friendly features, and sold for approximately twice that price.[44] Generic disposable diapers cost less per diaper, at an average price of $0.15 cents each, and the typical manufacturer's profit was about one cent per diaper.[44] However, the low-cost diapers needed to be changed more frequently, so the total cost savings was limited, as the lower cost per diaper was offset by the need to buy more diapers.[44]
Medical institutions such as the doctor’s offices and hospitals frequently get free samples of diapers from manufacturers to distribute to patients. Since those samples are usually samples of new products, there is no guarantee of what types or sizes are available, but if you call local doctors and hospitals in your area, you can find out what’s currently available.
Pampers Diapers and Huggies have a rewards program. They have unique one time use codes found inside the packages of diapers and some wipes. Save those and enter them on their websites (after making an account-when you sign up for pampers you will get 100 pts) When you have a certain amount of points, you can cash in for Free rewards. There are a ton of different items, and they change them too. When I reached 1,000 points I cashed out for a Dora Potty Seat for my youngest! Yay!
Target – Did you know you can get this awesome gift bag filled with free baby stuff when you create a Target Baby Registry? The picture above shows what I got; free diaper samples, wipes, bottles, pacifiers, coupons, plus much more. To see a detailed list of what came in my Target gift bag, click here. To get your free gift, just create a baby registry online. You’ll get an email from Target explaining how to pick up your gift bag at a Target store. This is a limited supply offer, so make sure to get yours today! 🙂

As of 2018, name-brand, mid-range disposable diapers in the U.S., such as Huggies and Pampers, were sold at an average cost of approximately US $0.20 to $0.30 cents each, and their manufacturers earned about two cents in profit from each diaper sold.[44] Premium brands had eco-friendly features, and sold for approximately twice that price.[44] Generic disposable diapers cost less per diaper, at an average price of $0.15 cents each, and the typical manufacturer's profit was about one cent per diaper.[44] However, the low-cost diapers needed to be changed more frequently, so the total cost savings was limited, as the lower cost per diaper was offset by the need to buy more diapers.[44]
Kimberly-Clark (NYSE: KMB) and its well-known global brands are an indispensable part of life for people in more than 175 countries. Every day, nearly a quarter of the world's population trust Kimberly-Clark brands and the solutions they provide to enhance their health, hygiene and well-being. With brands such as Kleenex, Scott, Huggies, Pull-Ups, Kotex and Depend, Kimberly-Clark holds the No.1 or No. 2 share position in 80 countries. To keep up with the latest news and to learn more about the company's 145-year history of innovation, visit www.kimberly-clark.com or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The charity type agencies listed below receive donations of diapers (or the money to pay for them) from local businesses, civic groups, community businesses, schools and faith-based organizations. Free samples can also be provided to some clients. The goal is to help ensure children and their parents have diapers, wipes, and other personal cleaning supplies to ensure that the child is healthy. Find a listing of resources by state below.
×