WARINING To avoid risk of choking, do not allow your child to tear the covering. Choking may result from anything children put in their mouths. Discard any torn or unsealed diaper. CAUTION: Like almost any article of clothing, disposable diapers will burn if exposed to flame. Always keep your child away from any source of flame. IMPORTANT: Shake baby soil into toilet. Wrap diaper inside its backsheet before discarding.DO NOT FLUSH DIAPER. PLEASE DO NOT LITTER. Made in the U.S.A. with domestic and imported parts.
As parents ourselves, we never want your little one uncomfortable. While irritation can occur for a variety of reasons, we'd like to learn more and see how we can help. When you have a moment, please connect with us online at http://bit.ly/2IumGnR or by phone at 1-877-648-2484 anytime Monday-Friday, 7:30AM-7PM CT. One of our specialists will be happy to help since we expect nothing but the best from our products and want the same for you and your baby. We look forward to hearing back from you!

San Francisco, San Mateo, San Jose, and Bay area California - The goal of the Bay Area Diaper Bank and other local groups is to distribute free diapers to agencies throughout northern California that serve mothers and children in need. Thousands of families take advantage of the assistance program every month. Find resources in San Francisco and San Mateo County.
In 2002, the Vienna city council proposed that horses be made to wear diapers to prevent them from defecating in the street. This caused controversy amongst animal rights groups, who claimed that wearing diapers would be uncomfortable for the animals. The campaigners protested by lining the streets wearing diapers themselves, which spelled out the message "Stop pooh bags".[38] In the Kenyan town of Limuru, donkeys were also diapered at the council's behest.[39] A similar scheme in Blackpool ordered that horses be fitted with rubber and plastic diapers to stop them littering the promenade with dung. The council consulted the RSPCA to ensure that the diapers were not harmful to the horses' welfare.[40][41][42]
The Middle English word diaper originally referred to a type of cloth rather than the use thereof; "diaper" was the term for a pattern of repeated, rhombic shapes, and later came to describe a white cotton or linen fabric with this pattern.[2] The first cloth diapers consisted of a specific type of soft tissue sheet, cut into geometric shapes. This type of pattern was called diapering and eventually gave its name to the cloth used to make diapers and then to the diaper itself, which was traced back to 1590s England.[3] This usage stuck in the United States and Canada following the British colonization of North America, but in the United Kingdom the word "nappy" took its place. Most sources believe nappy is a diminutive form of the word napkin, which itself was originally a diminutive.[4]
Our new and best-ever diaper has arrived! These super-absorbent, eco-friendly* diapers are made with naturally derived and sustainable materials* and they’re gentle for your baby’s delicate skin. Now featuring an improved fit and advanced leak protection like never before, this super-soft diaper is designed to perform. Oh, and did we mention how adorable they are?
In March 2010, Pampers announced a change to their popular Cruisers and Swaddlers diapers with the addition of the new Dry-Max technology. Many parents reported[22] rashes and chemical burns as a result of using the new diapers. Procter & Gamble claim that pediatric experts have reviewed the Pampers with DryMax safety data and have seen no correlation between the reported rash and diaper.[23] In May 2010, a lawsuit was filed against Procter & Gamble based on the injuries allegedly caused by the diapers.[24] In September 2010, the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission issued the results of its investigation into the matter, finding no evidence that these diapers cause diaper rash.[25]
Huggies Little Snugglers diapers are specially designed for gentle skin protection. With features like the pocketed-back waistband and GentleAbsorb liner that contain and draw the mess away, Little Snugglers help keep your baby?s delicate skin clean and healthy. Little Snugglers diapers also feature premium softness and breathability to help keep them comfortable. Little Snugglers diapers have double grip strips for a comfy fit that lasts, plus a wetness indicator that lets you know when it?s time for a change. In addition, Little Snugglers disposable diapers are fragrance-free, and feature NEW adorable Disney Baby Winnie the Pooh designs. Start your diaper-changing routine with Huggies Natural Care Wipes for a soft, gentle clean, then finish with Little Snugglers diapers. Join Huggies Rewards to earn points on all your Huggies purchases.
Many of these groups work with companies such as Huggies and their Every Little Bottom program. They may also have partnerships in place with Pampers and other diaper manufacturers so that samples can be given out to parents that request them. These are just a few of the non-profits and charities that distribute free diapers, but each state will also have clothing closets that can be contacted.

Like many other reviewers on here, we tried Baby Dry diapers as an alternative to Swaddlers and were sorry that we did. On a baby who is still on breast milk, the diapers resulted in feces going up their back and stomach, which soaked clothing, blankets and whatever else she happen to be touching. Our daughter's onesie was completely saturated in fecal matter, so we had to cut it off of her as to not get it on her face while trying to pull it over her head. So we lost $50 and a onesie, had to wash the bouncer, blanket, and my clothing, but we gained 276 useless diapers. It seems like you'd be better off using a handkerchief instead of Baby Dry diapers. I could only imagine the damage if she were on solid foods. Now that we're out diapers that work, we have to run to Babies-R-Us to get Swaddlers until the ones from Amazon arrive.


A diaper (American English) or a nappy (Australian English and British English) is a type of underwear that allows the wearer to defecate or urinate without the use of a toilet, by absorbing or containing waste products to prevent soiling of outer clothing or the external environment. When diapers become soiled, they require changing, generally by a second person such as a parent or caregiver. Failure to change a diaper on a sufficiently regular basis can result in skin problems around the area covered by the diaper.
Note: The pricing here isn’t static: these are the approximate costs for size 1 diapers bought in bulk (and even those are liable to change frequently online). As you go up in sizing (to size 2, 3, etc.), the price per diaper will increase. And, like anything else, the more you buy, the cheaper diapers are. Thus, buying in bulk saves a fair amount. More on sizing and pricing in a minute….
Kimberly-Clark (NYSE: KMB) and its well-known global brands are an indispensable part of life for people in more than 175 countries. Every day, nearly a quarter of the world's population trust Kimberly-Clark brands and the solutions they provide to enhance their health, hygiene and well-being. With brands such as Kleenex, Scott, Huggies, Pull-Ups, Kotex and Depend, Kimberly-Clark holds the No.1 or No. 2 share position in 80 countries. To keep up with the latest news and to learn more about the company's 145-year history of innovation, visit www.kimberly-clark.com or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
DO NOT BUY THESE! These are not the same Huggies I've used for years. We went up a size and these ones are paper thin, cut oddly and there are hard clumps of dried powder of some sort and they don't bend. I'm attaching a photo to the clump. They are in different parts of each diaper. These seem like knock off Huggies. And Amazon will NOT let me return them. I'm sending a letter to Huggies.
These are my favorite diapers and a favorite among eco-moms. They are hypoallergenic, chlorine-free, affordable, and perform exceptionally well. IMO, these diapers are the best combo of eco-friendly and absorbent. All of that, and they cost about the same as Pampers or Huggies. Some users say they run smaller than these mainstream brands, just FYI.

Things of My Very Own, Inc.-Crisis Intervention Center, 202 Front Street, Schenectady New York 12305, 518-630-5146. The capital region and down state are covered. So if you live in Albany or New York City you can call for information on diaper assistance programs. Thousands of working poor families with young babies get the free diapers they need from this NYC non-profit.
These early diapers were bulky, heavy products composed of fluff pulp with a rayon topsheet, polyethylene backsheet. In 1966, Pampers launched a 'wingfold' design and by 1969 started a "third size". By this time, Pampers had become a national brand in the United States.[citation needed] Procter and Gamble replaced the pin-on design with tapes in 1971. Toddler and Premature Infant sizes were also introduced. In 1973, P&G developed elasticized single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas to aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which had not been absorbed. In fact, the first patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper was in 1973 by P&G.[1] In 1982, Pampers introduced an elasticized wingfold diaper with elastic leg gathers and refastenable tapes which was a cross between the early 1960s design and the modern hourglass shape, a feature that was first introduced on Luvs in 1976 and evolved into an industry standard in 1985.[citation needed] In 1986, thin diapers made with absorbent gelling material were released. This made the average weight of a typical medium size diaper decrease by 50%.[2] In 1987, Pampers and Huggies both introduced frontal tape systems which allow repositioning of the lateral tape without tearing the diaper. In the 1990s Pampers introduced a thinner diaper known as Ultra Dry Thins.

"We're passionate about helping all babies thrive, especially the smallest and most fragile. This Huggies diaper reflects our ongoing commitment to deliver innovative solutions for the NICU," said Eleonora Daireaux, Vice President, Huggies North America. "After hearing of the need for a diaper that meets the special requirements of these babies, our expert teams in skin science, research, product safety and manufacturing were inspired. Knowing every second counts for these babies, the team acted quickly to bring Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers from concept to launch in hospitals in just six months."


I was always a Pampers user with my first kid 4 years ago and just had my second. I was given Pampers again at the hospital when he was born and loved them again from the start. I love the wetness indicator so I know when to change him, they hold everything in well, and fit great. I'll keep relying only on Pampers for this baby like I did for my first!
Medical institutions such as the doctor’s offices and hospitals frequently get free samples of diapers from manufacturers to distribute to patients. Since those samples are usually samples of new products, there is no guarantee of what types or sizes are available, but if you call local doctors and hospitals in your area, you can find out what’s currently available.

In March 2010, Pampers announced a change to their popular Cruisers and Swaddlers diapers with the addition of the new Dry-Max technology. Many parents reported[22] rashes and chemical burns as a result of using the new diapers. Procter & Gamble claim that pediatric experts have reviewed the Pampers with DryMax safety data and have seen no correlation between the reported rash and diaper.[23] In May 2010, a lawsuit was filed against Procter & Gamble based on the injuries allegedly caused by the diapers.[24] In September 2010, the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission issued the results of its investigation into the matter, finding no evidence that these diapers cause diaper rash.[25]


The eco-factor — The sad truth is that 3.5 million tons of diapers end up in landfills every year. While cloth diapers don’t end up in the landfill, they do require lots of water and power to launder. Some say the carbon footprint of cloth and other eco diapers may not be that much less, in reality. (You can reduce the carbon footprint of cloth diapers by washing them in cold water and hanging them to dry.) What about disposable diapers? We recommend fragrance-free diapers, as toxic chemicals can be lumped in with a “fragrance” so they don’t have to be disclosed on the list of ingredients (due to “trade secret” laws). We also prefer chlorine-free diapers if they’re available to you.
There are resources available to you if you need them, though. Also, don't discount cloth diapers if you have the means to launder them. They're often easier to get at free or reduced cost, not to mention they're way better for the environment, and you can be super smug about that. (Unrelated, but once you're done diapering your baby, those diapers really make the best dusting cloths and glass cleaners.)
"We're passionate about helping all babies thrive, especially the smallest and most fragile. This Huggies diaper reflects our ongoing commitment to deliver innovative solutions for the NICU," said Eleonora Daireaux, Vice President, Huggies North America. "After hearing of the need for a diaper that meets the special requirements of these babies, our expert teams in skin science, research, product safety and manufacturing were inspired. Knowing every second counts for these babies, the team acted quickly to bring Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers from concept to launch in hospitals in just six months."
In March 2010, Pampers announced a change to their popular Cruisers and Swaddlers diapers with the addition of the new Dry-Max technology. Many parents reported[22] rashes and chemical burns as a result of using the new diapers. Procter & Gamble claim that pediatric experts have reviewed the Pampers with DryMax safety data and have seen no correlation between the reported rash and diaper.[23] In May 2010, a lawsuit was filed against Procter & Gamble based on the injuries allegedly caused by the diapers.[24] In September 2010, the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission issued the results of its investigation into the matter, finding no evidence that these diapers cause diaper rash.[25]

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Earlier this month, Procter & Gamble PG, +0.82%  Pampers’ parent company, announced this week that prices for Pampers products will increase by an average of 4%, though it depends on the size and type of diaper as well as the retailer. Target TGT, -2.09% sells a 100-count pack of Pampers Swaddlers diapers for $24.99, which, with the increase, would rise to almost $26.
Our new and best-ever diaper has arrived! These super-absorbent, eco-friendly* diapers are made with naturally derived and sustainable materials* and they’re gentle for your baby’s delicate skin. Now featuring an improved fit and advanced leak protection like never before, this super-soft diaper is designed to perform. Oh, and did we mention how adorable they are?
The first disposable diaper was invented in 1946 by Marion Donovan, a professional-turned-housewife who wanted to ensure her children's cloth diapers remained dry while they slept.[16] Donovan patented her design (called 'Boaters') in 1951. She also invented the first paper diapers, but executives did not invest in this idea and it was consequently scrapped for over ten years, until Procter & Gamble used Donovan's design ideas to create Pampers.
My baby girl is allergic to every other diaper out there all we can use is pampers everything about the Daimler’s is great but I personally thought the fitting size was off my baby was breach and born via c section at 37 weeks she was only 7lbs 11oz and within one week of being home with weight lost mind you she weight 7lbs 2oz when we left the hospital and three days later went to first pediatrician appointment weighed 7lbs 5 oz her legs were getting cut up by the diapers!!! As soon as I saw this I immediately sent my husband to the store for size one and she was so small and the size 1 was so big she 2 1/2 months now and is 9lbs 13oz and she still fits in them. Overall the diapers are great everything about them but the fitting for new born sizes even my pediatrician said that she still should have fit in them she fir just right in the new born sized diapers they were just right fit not to big not to small and they cut her legs up so when we switched to size 1 she was so small in them she was swimming in the diaper.
Luvs makes a much cheaper diaper and you get what you pay for. It’s a decent diaper, although not very well made. Coincidentally, Luvs and Pampers are both made by Procter & Gamble, Pampers being the premium brand and Luvs being the economy brand. If you’re on a tight budget, I would instead recommend a chlorine-free store brand, such as Target’s up & up, which runs about 13 cents per diaper.
John’s wife, Chrissy Teigen, officially joined the Pampers family in March as the Creative Consultant for Pampers Pure. Made with premium cotton and other thoughtfully selected materials, stylish prints and 100% Pampers protection, the Pampers Pure Collection is a new choice for parents searching for diaper and wipe options in the “natural” category who don’t want to sacrifice performance.
An average child will go through several thousand diapers in their life.[45] Since disposable diapers are discarded after a single use, usage of disposable diapers increases the burden on landfill sites, and increased environmental awareness has led to a growth in campaigns for parents to use reusable alternatives such as cloth or hybrid diapers.[46] An estimated 27.4 billion disposable diapers are used each year in the US, resulting in a possible 3.4 million tons of used diapers adding to landfills each year.[47] A discarded disposable diaper takes up to 450 years to decompose.[48]
Don't get me wrong, I was exceedingly grateful for those things. Baby messes are something special, that's for sure. But between diapers, wipes, creams, ointments, new sheets and sleepers, stain remover, and sweat equity, the expense of it all is fairly extreme. It can put a heavy burden on families. No one should ever wonder how they're going to keep their baby clean in 2017, but here we are. In the United States, there is no government program available that pays for diapers. WIC and food stamps only cover nutrition, leaving families in the lurch when it comes to basics like diapers, wipes, and feminine hygiene products. In some states, they're even a taxable good, which seems to be just an insult to injury, but there you have it.
The Middle English word diaper originally referred to a type of cloth rather than the use thereof; "diaper" was the term for a pattern of repeated, rhombic shapes, and later came to describe a white cotton or linen fabric with this pattern.[2] The first cloth diapers consisted of a specific type of soft tissue sheet, cut into geometric shapes. This type of pattern was called diapering and eventually gave its name to the cloth used to make diapers and then to the diaper itself, which was traced back to 1590s England.[3] This usage stuck in the United States and Canada following the British colonization of North America, but in the United Kingdom the word "nappy" took its place. Most sources believe nappy is a diminutive form of the word napkin, which itself was originally a diminutive.[4]
The charity type agencies listed below receive donations of diapers (or the money to pay for them) from local businesses, civic groups, community businesses, schools and faith-based organizations. Free samples can also be provided to some clients. The goal is to help ensure children and their parents have diapers, wipes, and other personal cleaning supplies to ensure that the child is healthy. Find a listing of resources by state below.
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