BEWARE!!! Just because the box looks like Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max Diapers, these are NOT the same. My son is now 5 mo. old and we've been using Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max diapers since he was born (you know, with the blue wetness indicator on the front). However, these are NOT Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max. These are thinner, do not have the woven material inside the diaper and are not nearly as absorbent as the Swaddlers. My son has leaked out of his diaper the last 5 nights... these diapers simply are not absorbent enough to contain a night's worth of pee. We rarely had this problem with Dry Max. I won't be buying these again- they simply aren't worth the very little cost savings.
"Good-fitting diapers are important to the healthy growth and development of our smallest patients," said Anjanette Lee, MS, CCC/SLP, NTMTC, an infant development specialist at Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital in Houston, Texas, one of nine Level III and Level IV NICUs that tested the new diaper. "In our experience, we found Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers conformed to the baby's bottom without gapping or limiting leg movement. The thinner fasteners and less material at the waist provided a good fit for baby while still protecting their fragile skin."
[Aside: Look, every time I throw a diaper in the trash can, I feel bad, okay? I am otherwise a very good citizen of the earth: I recycle and compost, I take mass transit every day instead of driving, I [used to] make baby food instead of buying it in the jar… but when it came to scooping poop from a diaper into the toilet, then washing a bunch of poop-stained diapers in the washing machine (for which I had to use COINS because we rented an apartment in the City), my head started to explode. I’m sorry, Mother Earth. I hope you’ll find it in your earthy heart to forgive me. I still love you.]
We got these diapers because the price was unbeatable with the Amazon Mom subscription. We cloth diaper but use disposables at night and on long outings. These diapers have been great on her little bum and can get her through a six or seven hour stretch no problem. They do smell though- its a baby powder scent that's a bit on the chemical side. We've gotten used to it.
A nationwide network of clothing closets can be used. While some of them sell low cost goods, others will provide the essentials that a new, low income parent needs at no cost to them. Some struggling families may be given help for a newborn, or free diapers may be offered in an emergency. They also provide referrals. Find sources of free clothes and household items.
I normally do not write reviews. But this time I feel like I have to let other parents know what to expect with these diapers before going through the same negative experience I went through! The diapers are extremely thin. As soon as I put a diaper on my child, even if he does not pee for a while, the dry diaper becomes deformed and the cotton inside turns into clusters of cotton! As soon as my child pees even a little, the diaper automatically turns into a deformed diaper from the inside. The cotton inside breaks into a few clusters of cotton and if you dont change the diaper soon enough it will release all the urine onto your child's clothes. I was suprised to see that whether used or not, the diaper is very bad quality even if my child only has it on before it becomes a dirty diaper. I normally buy Luvs since they are less expensive and lock wetness pretty well. But they are not as popular as Huggies which was shocking to me. I guess ill be going back to other diapers. Please see attached an image where you can see transparently what happens with the diaper with just a very few use.
San Francisco, San Mateo, San Jose, and Bay area California - The goal of the Bay Area Diaper Bank and other local groups is to distribute free diapers to agencies throughout northern California that serve mothers and children in need. Thousands of families take advantage of the assistance program every month. Find resources in San Francisco and San Mateo County.
With our 1st child we relayed on swaddlers as much as possible. She was a skinny baby and they fit her around the lags and waist the best of all brands. We moved to another brand as she got older and more active because of the need for the extra fastening support none of the pampers have, but the swddlers always fit her the best and we had never had a blow out. Now on baby #2 and saddly this chunky child makes the waist fit a bit too tight. Swaddlers worked much better for our 1st child than it os for our second. Baby #2 has had the mesh liner stick to her when she her diapers comes off, it would not be so great to peel that off her if she had a rash. Sizing up makes the legs too big so we are using up our stock and moving to another brand for our 2nd baby. But for our 1st we still buy pampers when we can its just a hair more affordable. Overall swaddlers are a good diaper for a skinnier child than a chunky baby from my experience, i only wish they would find a way so the mesh didn't stick to your child as that happened all the time with both children.
Intro: After five years and three kiddos I have used a variety of diapers including Pampers (Swaddles and Baby Dry), Huggies (Little Snugglers and Snug &Dry), Honest, Target, and Luvs. I personally only bought Honest, Target (Up&Up), Babyganics and Luvs a couple times because I didn’t like the feel (Honest diapers and Babyganics are very stiff and papery) and absorption. That being said, I had found that Pampers and Huggies had ‘premium’ (Pampers Swaddlers and Huggies Little Snugglers) and ‘regular’ (Pampers Baby Dry and Huggies Snug & Dry) classes of diapers. I have compared these four different diapers - all in my current purchasing size (Size 5).
Huggies believes deeply in the Power of Hugs. That's why every Huggies diaper and wipe is inspired by parents' hugs. For nearly 40 years, Huggies has been helping parents provide love, care and reassurance to help babies thrive. No Baby Unhugged is Huggies promise to ensure babies get the care they need to thrive, including innovative everyday products, growing hospital hugger programs, specially-designed products for the smallest of babies, on-going clinical research and resources, and diaper and wipes donations. Huggies is the fastest growing diaper brand in hospitals and partners with NICU nurses to develop diapers and wipes that meet the specific needs of pre-term infants. For more information on Huggies No Baby Unhugged program visit the "Why Huggies?" page at Huggies.com.
These early diapers were bulky, heavy products composed of fluff pulp with a rayon topsheet, polyethylene backsheet. In 1966, Pampers launched a 'wingfold' design and by 1969 started a "third size". By this time, Pampers had become a national brand in the United States.[citation needed] Procter and Gamble replaced the pin-on design with tapes in 1971. Toddler and Premature Infant sizes were also introduced. In 1973, P&G developed elasticized single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas to aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which had not been absorbed. In fact, the first patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper was in 1973 by P&G.[1] In 1982, Pampers introduced an elasticized wingfold diaper with elastic leg gathers and refastenable tapes which was a cross between the early 1960s design and the modern hourglass shape, a feature that was first introduced on Luvs in 1976 and evolved into an industry standard in 1985.[citation needed] In 1986, thin diapers made with absorbent gelling material were released. This made the average weight of a typical medium size diaper decrease by 50%.[2] In 1987, Pampers and Huggies both introduced frontal tape systems which allow repositioning of the lateral tape without tearing the diaper. In the 1990s Pampers introduced a thinner diaper known as Ultra Dry Thins.

Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
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