There are several different organizations around the country that distribute free diapers to needy and low income families. Many of these are charities or churches, with some government programs also assisting. There are programs for single mothers, teenage moms, and families living in poverty. Anyone that needs free or low cost diapers near where they live, and that meets qualifications, may apply.
Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]
Many of these groups work with companies such as Huggies and their Every Little Bottom program. They may also have partnerships in place with Pampers and other diaper manufacturers so that samples can be given out to parents that request them. These are just a few of the non-profits and charities that distribute free diapers, but each state will also have clothing closets that can be contacted.

An average child will go through several thousand diapers in their life.[45] Since disposable diapers are discarded after a single use, usage of disposable diapers increases the burden on landfill sites, and increased environmental awareness has led to a growth in campaigns for parents to use reusable alternatives such as cloth or hybrid diapers.[46] An estimated 27.4 billion disposable diapers are used each year in the US, resulting in a possible 3.4 million tons of used diapers adding to landfills each year.[47] A discarded disposable diaper takes up to 450 years to decompose.[48]
Many of these groups work with companies such as Huggies and their Every Little Bottom program. They may also have partnerships in place with Pampers and other diaper manufacturers so that samples can be given out to parents that request them. These are just a few of the non-profits and charities that distribute free diapers, but each state will also have clothing closets that can be contacted.
If your goal is to get a trash can to conceal the smell, there are three that parents favor: the Baby Trend Diaper Champ ($34, pictured left) is an inexpensive pail that uses regular tall kitchen trash bags (yay!). Simply place the diaper in the opening, then pull the handle so it drops down into the can. So easy and best of all, no squishing a poop-filled mess through a narrow slot, like with the Diaper Genie (yuck!), although I will admit you can still smell poop with this one.
Cuties Wipes are made with the same high quality materials as Cuties Diapers — Aloe, Vitamin E and Chamomile. These hypoallergenic wipes are soft on baby’s skin, yet durable enough to clean up tough messes. Cuties Wipes Tri-Form fabric has two soft outer layers and one strong inner layer to prevent the wipe from tearing. Soft pack wipes can be easily opened with a push of the finger to ensure that clean-up is sanitary.

With our 1st child we relayed on swaddlers as much as possible. She was a skinny baby and they fit her around the lags and waist the best of all brands. We moved to another brand as she got older and more active because of the need for the extra fastening support none of the pampers have, but the swddlers always fit her the best and we had never had a blow out. Now on baby #2 and saddly this chunky child makes the waist fit a bit too tight. Swaddlers worked much better for our 1st child than it os for our second. Baby #2 has had the mesh liner stick to her when she her diapers comes off, it would not be so great to peel that off her if she had a rash. Sizing up makes the legs too big so we are using up our stock and moving to another brand for our 2nd baby. But for our 1st we still buy pampers when we can its just a hair more affordable. Overall swaddlers are a good diaper for a skinnier child than a chunky baby from my experience, i only wish they would find a way so the mesh didn't stick to your child as that happened all the time with both children.
The only thing you get is some coupons and sample packs of infant formula from enfamil. Oh, and a bunch of spam emails from the companies they sell your email address too. Not worth the hundreds of questions you have to answer and other offers you have to sign up for. Your hospital will give you a bag with a can of formula and sometimes coupons from some companies they use (Johnson and Johnson) and that’s about it. When I had my daughter in December all I got was a bag and my nurses were wonderful and gave us extra diapers, wipes, wash and lotion but it came from the hospitals stash and nothing that Gerber gives to them to give each new mom like they did in 20012 and 2005 when I had my other kids.
Most children no longer wear diapers when past two to four years of age, depending on culture, diaper type, parental habits, and the child's personality.[28] However, it is becoming increasingly common for children as old as five to still be wearing diapers because of their parents' neglect or the child's opposition to toilet training. This can pose a number of problems if the child is sent to school wearing diapers, including teasing from classmates and health issues resulting from soiled diapers. Teachers' groups—who are attributing the epidemic to an increase in full-time day care use—are requesting that diapered children be banned from the classroom.[citation needed] The disposable diaper industry has been accused of encouraging this trend by manufacturing diapers in increasingly larger sizes. "[S]uper-comfortable diapers" have also been criticized; the advanced technology in modern diapers wick wetness away from skin, leaving the child oblivious to their accident and when they need to go to the toilet. Paediatric nurse June Rogers claims that the attitude of parents plays a major role in the problem, and that toilet training is simply not a priority for many of them.[29][30]
Things of My Very Own, Inc.-Crisis Intervention Center, 202 Front Street, Schenectady New York 12305, 518-630-5146. The capital region and down state are covered. So if you live in Albany or New York City you can call for information on diaper assistance programs. Thousands of working poor families with young babies get the free diapers they need from this NYC non-profit.
Do you have a favorite brand that also makes diapers? I really like the dish soap from Seventh Generation, and they also have baby diapers. Sign up for their “Generation Good” club and you might get selected to receive product samples! Start noticing the companies you use that also make diapers, and reach out to them to see if you can try a sample from them!

Another favorite is the Munchkin Step Diaper Pail ($64), which wins the odor control contest. This pail requires special bags and uses a baking soda dispenser (which you also have to refill) to control odor. It does require a bit of diaper-squishing, but not nearly as much as the Diaper Genie. If odor control is a top priority and you don’t mind buying special bags, this is your go-to.
Earlier this month, Procter & Gamble PG, +0.82%  Pampers’ parent company, announced this week that prices for Pampers products will increase by an average of 4%, though it depends on the size and type of diaper as well as the retailer. Target TGT, -2.09% sells a 100-count pack of Pampers Swaddlers diapers for $24.99, which, with the increase, would rise to almost $26.
To help support new and expecting moms, Target is giving away a free Welcome Kit when you set up a baby registry.  The kit includes $50+ worth of coupons and free diapers. After creating your registry, visit the Target service desk to pick up your free Welcome Kit. Items may vary by stores, but may include: Munchkin bottle, Lansinoh samples, MAM Newborn pacifier, Honest Wipes, and Diapers sample pack, Baby Bag and much more!
The Atlanta Community Food Bank provides free diapers in partnership with local charities and national businesses such as Pampers and Huggies Every Little Bottom Program assistance. Many of the cloth or disposable diapers distributed are available to low income because the box may have been damaged by the retailer, but the products themselves are in great condition. Some may refer to them as salvaged. Atlanta Georgia (404) 892-3333.
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