In 1946, Marion Donovan used a shower curtain from her bathroom to create the "Boater", a plastic cover to be donned outside a diaper. First sold in 1949 at Saks Fifth Avenue's flagship store in New York City, patents were later issued in 1951 to Donovan, who later sold the rights to the waterproof diaper for $1 million.[6] Donovan also designed a paper disposable diaper, but was unsuccessful in marketing it.[7]
Another aspect to consider when choosing between disposable diapers and cloth diapers is cost. It is estimated that an average baby will use from $1,500 to $2,000 or more in disposable diapers before being potty-trained.[54] In contrast, cloth diapers, while initially more expensive than disposables, cost as low as $300 for a basic set of cloth diapers, although costs can rise with more expensive options.[55][56] The cost of washing and drying diapers must also be considered. The basic set, if one-sized, can last from birth to potty-training.
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"Good-fitting diapers are important to the healthy growth and development of our smallest patients," said Anjanette Lee, MS, CCC/SLP, NTMTC, an infant development specialist at Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital in Houston, Texas, one of nine Level III and Level IV NICUs that tested the new diaper. "In our experience, we found Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers conformed to the baby's bottom without gapping or limiting leg movement. The thinner fasteners and less material at the waist provided a good fit for baby while still protecting their fragile skin."
"Good-fitting diapers are important to the healthy growth and development of our smallest patients," said Anjanette Lee, MS, CCC/SLP, NTMTC, an infant development specialist at Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital in Houston, Texas, one of nine Level III and Level IV NICUs that tested the new diaper. "In our experience, we found Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers conformed to the baby's bottom without gapping or limiting leg movement. The thinner fasteners and less material at the waist provided a good fit for baby while still protecting their fragile skin."
Cost — A quick calculation: unless you are using a clean-at-home cloth diaper system, you will be spending *roughly* $40/month on diapers. Some diapers are cheaper, like store brands. Some are more expensive. You may decide, after getting pooped on multiple times, that a higher quality diaper is worth the extra money. Or maybe you’re into it (hard for me to say, we just met). According to Consumer Reports, the average family spends about $2,500 on diapers per child. If you opt for eco-friendly (more pricey) diapers –  good for you, btw –  that number is even higher: $3,500.
All those diaper expenses add up. In its first year, a baby can go through 2,500 to 3,000 diapers, costing parents between $500 and $1,000, said Jen Dicks Burg, blogger at the The Suburban Mom and mother to three girls. BabyCenter, an online media company for parents and expectant parents, estimates that disposable diapers cost $72 per month for the first year (or $864 a year), based on a survey of more than 1,000 new moms.
I have really enjoyed using Pampers diapers, along with Pampers wipes (which seem to be the only wipes that don’t bother my newborn). The diapers have a yellow line on the, which changes colors when your little one has wet the diaper. I didn’t realize how useful this was until I used honest diapers, which don’t have this feature and it made it difficult to always know if an immediate change was necessary. I have found that the fit of the diaper makes it so a blow out is less likely as well. I have noticed that the diaper can hold a lot of poop and fluid. The only other diaper brands I have used are Kirkland signature and Huggies, both of which were also fine. We will continue to use Pampers diapers because they have a high quality product and particularly the Pampers wipes, which we really like. We received some free diapers in exchange for this review, however, we had already been using the Pampers products and will continue to.
Do you have a favorite brand that also makes diapers? I really like the dish soap from Seventh Generation, and they also have baby diapers. Sign up for their “Generation Good” club and you might get selected to receive product samples! Start noticing the companies you use that also make diapers, and reach out to them to see if you can try a sample from them!
Another favorite is the Munchkin Step Diaper Pail ($64), which wins the odor control contest. This pail requires special bags and uses a baking soda dispenser (which you also have to refill) to control odor. It does require a bit of diaper-squishing, but not nearly as much as the Diaper Genie. If odor control is a top priority and you don’t mind buying special bags, this is your go-to.
We have tried almost all other brands including, Target, Luvs and Huggies. Although usually more expensive, Pampers by far have done a better job with diaper rash. We change diapers probably more than usual (approx.) 12-15/day. That said, the other than Pampers diapers left red rashes on bottom. Some of the rashes looked like open wounds. On a hunch, I believed it was from the specific diapers. Sure enough, the Pampers and the mesh lining did away with the rash. I did apply cream to alleviate rash but I usually don't have to use if baby is in Pampers swaddlers. It's true that you get what you pay ft
In the 20th century, the disposable diaper was conceived. In the 1930s, Robinsons of Chesterfield had what were labeled "Destroyable Babies Napkins" listed in their catalogue for the wholesale market.[5] In 1944, Hugo Drangel of the Swedish paper company Pauliström suggested a conceptual design which would entail the placing of sheets of paper tissue (cellulose wadding) inside the cloth diaper and rubber pants. However, cellulose wadding was rough against the skin and crumbled into balls when exposed to moisture.
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The Middle English word diaper originally referred to a type of cloth rather than the use thereof; "diaper" was the term for a pattern of repeated, rhombic shapes, and later came to describe a white cotton or linen fabric with this pattern.[2] The first cloth diapers consisted of a specific type of soft tissue sheet, cut into geometric shapes. This type of pattern was called diapering and eventually gave its name to the cloth used to make diapers and then to the diaper itself, which was traced back to 1590s England.[3] This usage stuck in the United States and Canada following the British colonization of North America, but in the United Kingdom the word "nappy" took its place. Most sources believe nappy is a diminutive form of the word napkin, which itself was originally a diminutive.[4]
Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
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