Wrap your baby in a diaper that's 2x softer and the #1 Choice of Hospitals, Nurses and Parents. Its comforting Heart Quilts liner provides breathability and comfort while pulling wetness and mess away from the skin. In addition, Air Channels help distribute moisture evenly, providing up to 12 hours of protection, while a Wetness Indicator tells you when your baby might need a change. For complete comfort, the outer cover is Blankie Soft with a special Umbilical Cord Notch to protect your newborn baby's belly with a perfectly contoured fit (sizes N-2). Hospitals: based on hospital sales data; nurses: vs. other hospital brands, among those with a preference; parents: based on retail sales. vs. the every-day-of-the-year brand
The eco-factor — The sad truth is that 3.5 million tons of diapers end up in landfills every year. While cloth diapers don’t end up in the landfill, they do require lots of water and power to launder. Some say the carbon footprint of cloth and other eco diapers may not be that much less, in reality. (You can reduce the carbon footprint of cloth diapers by washing them in cold water and hanging them to dry.) What about disposable diapers? We recommend fragrance-free diapers, as toxic chemicals can be lumped in with a “fragrance” so they don’t have to be disclosed on the list of ingredients (due to “trade secret” laws). We also prefer chlorine-free diapers if they’re available to you.
All those diaper expenses add up. In its first year, a baby can go through 2,500 to 3,000 diapers, costing parents between $500 and $1,000, said Jen Dicks Burg, blogger at the The Suburban Mom and mother to three girls. BabyCenter, an online media company for parents and expectant parents, estimates that disposable diapers cost $72 per month for the first year (or $864 a year), based on a survey of more than 1,000 new moms.

Pampers is marketed in various ways, such as print ads and television commercials. Print ads often appear in magazines and other periodicals. Television commercials appear during soap operas co-produced by Procter and Gamble, such as Bold and the Beautiful & Young and the Restless, and during the airing of parenting shows. Another way Pampers is promoted is through product placement. Pampers paid $50,000 to be featured in the film Three Men and a Baby.[citation needed] P&G has also sponsored the program Make Room for Baby on the Discovery Health Channel. Pampers has been promoted in some countries on billboards. Another method that has been used to promote the product is direct marketing program where relevant content is mailed to mothers with babies. These mailings can include Pampers samples or Pampers Coupons.


An average child will go through several thousand diapers in their life.[45] Since disposable diapers are discarded after a single use, usage of disposable diapers increases the burden on landfill sites, and increased environmental awareness has led to a growth in campaigns for parents to use reusable alternatives such as cloth or hybrid diapers.[46] An estimated 27.4 billion disposable diapers are used each year in the US, resulting in a possible 3.4 million tons of used diapers adding to landfills each year.[47] A discarded disposable diaper takes up to 450 years to decompose.[48]
There are resources available to you if you need them, though. Also, don't discount cloth diapers if you have the means to launder them. They're often easier to get at free or reduced cost, not to mention they're way better for the environment, and you can be super smug about that. (Unrelated, but once you're done diapering your baby, those diapers really make the best dusting cloths and glass cleaners.)
These early diapers were bulky, heavy products composed of fluff pulp with a rayon topsheet, polyethylene backsheet. In 1966, Pampers launched a 'wingfold' design and by 1969 started a "third size". By this time, Pampers had become a national brand in the United States.[citation needed] Procter and Gamble replaced the pin-on design with tapes in 1971. Toddler and Premature Infant sizes were also introduced. In 1973, P&G developed elasticized single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas to aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which had not been absorbed. In fact, the first patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper was in 1973 by P&G.[1] In 1982, Pampers introduced an elasticized wingfold diaper with elastic leg gathers and refastenable tapes which was a cross between the early 1960s design and the modern hourglass shape, a feature that was first introduced on Luvs in 1976 and evolved into an industry standard in 1985.[citation needed] In 1986, thin diapers made with absorbent gelling material were released. This made the average weight of a typical medium size diaper decrease by 50%.[2] In 1987, Pampers and Huggies both introduced frontal tape systems which allow repositioning of the lateral tape without tearing the diaper. In the 1990s Pampers introduced a thinner diaper known as Ultra Dry Thins.
“At the Diaper Bank of Central Arizona, we collect money, diapers, and wipes from the public and then we partner with around 30 non-profits around the Phoenix metro area whom we give our diapers to. They then go on to hand those diapers out in one of two ways. 1.) Our partners give out emergency supplies of diapers that last usually around 2 days. 2.) Other agencies we work with take on families as part of their normal case management, and they provide diapers for a longer period of time so long as that family is in their program.”
*Ad dates and offers vary by market. mPerks offers good with mPerks digital coupon(s). See coupon(s) for terms. Buy one, get one (BOGO) promotional items must be of equal or lesser value. Special pricing and offers are good only while supplies last. No rainchecks or substitutions unless otherwise stated. Buy/save offers must be purchased in a single transaction; no cash back. Other conditions and/or exclusions may apply. Meijer.com reserves the right to limit quantities (including after you've submitted your order).
John’s wife, Chrissy Teigen, officially joined the Pampers family in March as the Creative Consultant for Pampers Pure. Made with premium cotton and other thoughtfully selected materials, stylish prints and 100% Pampers protection, the Pampers Pure Collection is a new choice for parents searching for diaper and wipe options in the “natural” category who don’t want to sacrifice performance.
With Pampers Rewards, you need to download an app to scan in the in-pack codes. I did it and it's actually super easy. You get 100 points for signing up, 50 more when you scan in your first code. The one hitch is that while Pampers Rewards has loads of stuff you can get with relatively few points, it actually takes a lot of freaking points to earn a pack of free diapers. I did the math, and it would take 16 purchases of 166-count Pamper Swaddlers Size 4s to earn the 2100 points required to get a free pack. Now that's a lot, but also, you're going to buy the 16 packs anyway, so you may as well get one for free.
If you can’t afford diapers right now, then I want to mention that there are loads of places that give out FREE Diapers to those in need. They are called “Diaper Banks” and they are on a mission to make up for the diaper “gap” in order for every baby to have clean diapers. If you have extra diapers, BabyCycle in St. Pete and HereWeGrow in Dunedin are both in desperate need of your diapers.
Luvs makes a much cheaper diaper and you get what you pay for. It’s a decent diaper, although not very well made. Coincidentally, Luvs and Pampers are both made by Procter & Gamble, Pampers being the premium brand and Luvs being the economy brand. If you’re on a tight budget, I would instead recommend a chlorine-free store brand, such as Target’s up & up, which runs about 13 cents per diaper.
At the time the Pampers Size 6 were introduced, there was a debate between a pediatrician, T. Berry Brazelton, and syndicated columnist and best-selling author of books for parents, John Rosemond. The controversy was about the length of time a baby should wear diapers and when to start toilet training. Rosemond believes it is a "slap to the intelligence of a human being that one would allow baby to continue soiling and wetting him/herself past age 2."[20] While Rosemond concedes that Brazelton has been giving the same advice for decades, he criticized the pediatrician for serving as a consultant to Pampers, a division of Procter & Gamble, and for appearing in Pampers commercials.[21]
In the 19th century, the modern diaper began to take shape and mothers in many parts of the world used cotton material, held in place with a fastening—eventually the safety pin. Cloth diapers in the United States were first mass-produced in 1887 by Maria Allen. In the UK, nappies were made out of terry towelling, often with an inner lining made out of soft muslin.
An average child will go through several thousand diapers in their life.[45] Since disposable diapers are discarded after a single use, usage of disposable diapers increases the burden on landfill sites, and increased environmental awareness has led to a growth in campaigns for parents to use reusable alternatives such as cloth or hybrid diapers.[46] An estimated 27.4 billion disposable diapers are used each year in the US, resulting in a possible 3.4 million tons of used diapers adding to landfills each year.[47] A discarded disposable diaper takes up to 450 years to decompose.[48]
The Honest Co. – I requested a FREE Diaper Bundle from The Honest Company and chose the sizes and prints I wanted. There are lots of cute prints for both boys and girls! They sent me 7 free diaper samples and a package of wipes in my bundle (see photo above). The Honest Co also offers a FREE Essentials Bundle which contains baby and household products. Both trial bundles are FREE, you just pay a flat $5.95 shipping fee. This is a fantastic deal, since the Diapers Bundle sells for $79.95 and the Essentials bundle is $39.95! I personally think paying just $5.95 for them to ship it straight to your door makes it a no-brainer. TIP: To save on shipping, you can add BOTH the FREE Diapers Bundle and the Essentials bundle to the same order and you’ll still pay only $5.95 total. 🙂
Yes, Honest Company (and others) get a lot of publicity for their celebrity founders and Kardashian product placement, but generally, we are not impressed (to say the least, I’m being kind). They may be super cute, but parents frequently complain that diapers from the Honest Company and Parasol really don’t contain the elements, so to speak…which is the whole point. (Seriously, they have horror stories. And if you end up having to use twice as many diapers to prevent leakage, how much greener can they really be? Plus, who wants to be changing twice as many diapers?)
We have tried almost all other brands including, Target, Luvs and Huggies. Although usually more expensive, Pampers by far have done a better job with diaper rash. We change diapers probably more than usual (approx.) 12-15/day. That said, the other than Pampers diapers left red rashes on bottom. Some of the rashes looked like open wounds. On a hunch, I believed it was from the specific diapers. Sure enough, the Pampers and the mesh lining did away with the rash. I did apply cream to alleviate rash but I usually don't have to use if baby is in Pampers swaddlers. It's true that you get what you pay ft
We have two kiddos and have always been loyal to Pampers diapers. We loved their super soft design and their adorable characters that we know and love. Recently that all changed. The diapers are far less soft and are prone to leakage. As soon as they are wet, the diapers smell immediately. We are so disappointed with the new design and changes recently made. Hoping Pampers will consider returning to their old quality standards so we can continue to be loyal customers. ☹️
Absorbent Bio-Core [Totally Chlorine-Free (TCF) Wood Pulp From Sustainably Managed Forests, Sodium Polyacrylate Containing Renewable Materials & Odor Inhibitors Including Citrus Extract & Liquid Chlorophyll], Outer Layer (Plant-Based PLA), Inner Layer (Polyethylene & Polypropylene), Leg/Waist System (Polymer Spandex & Polypropylene), Polyolefin Adhesives in the Seams & Joints, Super-Cute Design on Backsheet (Inks)
Amazon Family is a program I highly recommend, although it’s not as good as it used to be (formerly known as Amazon Mom). With your Amazon Prime membership ($99 per year with a free 30-day trial), you get free 2-day shipping, PLUS 20% off diapers when ordered with Subscribe & Save. The savings on shipping for last-minute birthday and holidays gifts alone is worth it to me, but if you don’t shop a lot online, it may not make sense.
Seattle area residents can contact WestSide Baby for free diapers. The non-profit organization is mostly run by volunteers from the community. They currently distribute almost 300,000 diapers to the low income, unemployed, and working poor in Washington. They also partner with numerous local organizations, including more than 100 social service agencies and charities. People can not only get free diapers from the organization, but they can also get toys, clothing, and baby equipment like cribs and car seats. Call (206) 767-1662
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