Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.

But honestly, cloth diapers, as I mentioned earlier, have the most robust free diaper programs and they're the easiest to access. Groups like Giving Diapers, Giving Hope and The Rebecca Foundation's Cloth Diaper Closet offer free cloth diapers to those in need. Alternatively, you can get free or very cheap cloth diapers from online forums like Diaper Swappers that specialize in recycled (highly laundered) cloth diapers. Change-Diapers.com is a great resource with a link every Friday for cloth diaper giveaways they've found online, too.
The decision on how to diaper your baby need not be complicated – with so many modern options it's easy to browse and compare to see what's right for your family. Fans of cloth diapers can choose from flatfold cotton diapers, organic cotton prefolded diapers, snap closure diapering systems, diaper inserts, hybrid diapers and more. Make a splash with full–coverage, lightweight reusable swim diapers – they are perfect for fun at the beach, pool or back yard water play; compare disposable swim pants and reusable diapers to get the perfect fit. Your little one will be in baby diapers for at least a year or more, so take the time to research the many diapering solutions available today. Our selection of disposable diapers includes newborn diapers, diapers for sensitive skin, ultra–absorbent diapers, hypoallergenic and fragrance–free diapers, chlorine–free unbleached diapers and more. Discover the freedom of baby diaper covers and inserts too.
Earlier this month, Procter & Gamble PG, +0.82%  Pampers’ parent company, announced this week that prices for Pampers products will increase by an average of 4%, though it depends on the size and type of diaper as well as the retailer. Target TGT, -2.09% sells a 100-count pack of Pampers Swaddlers diapers for $24.99, which, with the increase, would rise to almost $26.
In addition to the other two baby Registries, Babies R Us will PAY YOU 10% in reward dollars for anything purchased on your registry! WHAT?! Yes, that means you can use the money (via a gift card) to buy more items (aka get Diapers for FREE!), and remember, Babies R Us (or Toys R Us) take coupons. And, you can also use a manufacturer coupon on those diapers to get even more for your money!
I normally do not write reviews. But this time I feel like I have to let other parents know what to expect with these diapers before going through the same negative experience I went through! The diapers are extremely thin. As soon as I put a diaper on my child, even if he does not pee for a while, the dry diaper becomes deformed and the cotton inside turns into clusters of cotton! As soon as my child pees even a little, the diaper automatically turns into a deformed diaper from the inside. The cotton inside breaks into a few clusters of cotton and if you dont change the diaper soon enough it will release all the urine onto your child's clothes. I was suprised to see that whether used or not, the diaper is very bad quality even if my child only has it on before it becomes a dirty diaper. I normally buy Luvs since they are less expensive and lock wetness pretty well. But they are not as popular as Huggies which was shocking to me. I guess ill be going back to other diapers. Please see attached an image where you can see transparently what happens with the diaper with just a very few use.
To help support new and expecting moms, Target is giving away a free Welcome Kit when you set up a baby registry.  The kit includes $50+ worth of coupons and free diapers. After creating your registry, visit the Target service desk to pick up your free Welcome Kit. Items may vary by stores, but may include: Munchkin bottle, Lansinoh samples, MAM Newborn pacifier, Honest Wipes, and Diapers sample pack, Baby Bag and much more!

If your goal is to get a trash can to conceal the smell, there are three that parents favor: the Baby Trend Diaper Champ ($34, pictured left) is an inexpensive pail that uses regular tall kitchen trash bags (yay!). Simply place the diaper in the opening, then pull the handle so it drops down into the can. So easy and best of all, no squishing a poop-filled mess through a narrow slot, like with the Diaper Genie (yuck!), although I will admit you can still smell poop with this one.
I have really enjoyed using Pampers diapers, along with Pampers wipes (which seem to be the only wipes that don’t bother my newborn). The diapers have a yellow line on the, which changes colors when your little one has wet the diaper. I didn’t realize how useful this was until I used honest diapers, which don’t have this feature and it made it difficult to always know if an immediate change was necessary. I have found that the fit of the diaper makes it so a blow out is less likely as well. I have noticed that the diaper can hold a lot of poop and fluid. The only other diaper brands I have used are Kirkland signature and Huggies, both of which were also fine. We will continue to use Pampers diapers because they have a high quality product and particularly the Pampers wipes, which we really like. We received some free diapers in exchange for this review, however, we had already been using the Pampers products and will continue to.
In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]
I tried Pampers Swadlers for the first time with my baby because those were what the hospital had when she was born. I’ve been impressed by everything about them. They’re super absorbent, great for night time, and they keep my baby dry. Even if she poops and I don’t notice right away, it doesn’t stick on her skin, which makes it a lot easier to wipe and clean up. She hasn’t had any diaper rash since she was born. I also love how soft they are, so I know she’s comfortable. I’m not a huge fan of the baby powder smell, but it’s not so strong that it’s a turn off. These diapers have exceeded my expectations!
In 1946, Marion Donovan used a shower curtain from her bathroom to create the "Boater", a plastic cover to be donned outside a diaper. First sold in 1949 at Saks Fifth Avenue's flagship store in New York City, patents were later issued in 1951 to Donovan, who later sold the rights to the waterproof diaper for $1 million.[6] Donovan also designed a paper disposable diaper, but was unsuccessful in marketing it.[7]
Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
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