To all ladies who have commented and those just reading…emails and calling 1-800 numbers may only get you so far. I actually took time to write a formal letter to Johnson and Johnson as a class project in school and was sent all types of samples and a really nice letter in response. Try it old school and you may at least get a good coupon if not samples of many types. BUT, you have to be nice in your letter to them not acting as if you are owed something. Tell them you’ve used their products for years, or know of those who have and that you are interested in trying certain items, your due date….if they had promotional item(s) you could try. Boost their EGO and they might boost you with gear/samples. Just throwing it out there – Good luck!
Baby companies give out a ton of free baby samples but only if they know you're out there and have a baby. If there's a company that makes a baby product you'd like to try, you should visit their website and register your information with them. This way when the baby companies decide to send out free baby samples, they'll automatically send one out to you.
The environmental impact of cloth as compared to disposable diapers has been studied several times. In one cradle-to-grave study sponsored by the National Association of Diaper Services (NADS) and conducted by Carl Lehrburger and colleagues, results found that disposable diapers produce seven times more solid waste when discarded and three times more waste in the manufacturing process. In addition, effluents from the plastic, pulp, and paper industries are far more hazardous than those from the cotton-growing and -manufacturing processes. Single-use diapers consume less water than reusables laundered at home, but more than those sent to a commercial diaper service. Washing cloth diapers at home uses 50 to 70 gallons (approx. 189 to 264 litres) of water every three days, which is roughly equivalent to flushing the toilet 15 times a day, unless the user has a high-efficiency washing machine. An average diaper service puts its diapers through an average of 13 water changes, but uses less water and energy per diaper than one laundry load at home.[49]
Otherwise, another great option to save money on diapers is signing up for Amazon Family. You have to become an Amazon Prime Member (which means paying $99/year, however you can Try Amazon Prime with their 30-Day Free Trial first!) but you will get free two-day shipping on millions of items and unlimited music and video streaming along with your awesome diaper savings of 20% off diaper subscriptions! Plus, you can get a 15% Amazon Baby Registry completion discount. The diaper boxes from Amazon are also bigger and will cost less per diaper often than your local stores, plus you won’t have to spend gas to go pick it up!

Yes, Honest Company (and others) get a lot of publicity for their celebrity founders and Kardashian product placement, but generally, we are not impressed (to say the least, I’m being kind). They may be super cute, but parents frequently complain that diapers from the Honest Company and Parasol really don’t contain the elements, so to speak…which is the whole point. (Seriously, they have horror stories. And if you end up having to use twice as many diapers to prevent leakage, how much greener can they really be? Plus, who wants to be changing twice as many diapers?)
For the design-conscious, an awesome yet pricier diaper pail is the Ubbi Steel Diaper Pail (right). At $69, this sleek diaper pail comes in dozens of different colors, is made of odor-blocking steel, AND doesn’t require special bags–  it’s the top selling diaper pail on Amazon. If you have the money, the Ubbi is as good as it gets. And really? This is a worthwhile place to spend a little extra. If you have more than one kid, you could be using this for years.
Although most commonly worn by and associated with babies and children, diapers are also worn by adults for a variety of reasons. In the medical community, they are usually referred to as "adult absorbent briefs" rather than diapers, which are associated with children and may have a negative connotation. The usage of adult diapers can be a source of embarrassment,[35] and products are often marketed under euphemisms such as incontinence pads. The most common adult users of diapers are those with medical conditions which cause them to experience urinary like bed wetting or fecal incontinence, or those who are bedridden or otherwise limited in their mobility.

Huggies believes deeply in the Power of Hugs. That's why every Huggies diaper and wipe is inspired by parents' hugs. For nearly 40 years, Huggies has been helping parents provide love, care and reassurance to help babies thrive. No Baby Unhugged is Huggies promise to ensure babies get the care they need to thrive, including innovative everyday products, growing hospital hugger programs, specially-designed products for the smallest of babies, on-going clinical research and resources, and diaper and wipes donations. Huggies is the fastest growing diaper brand in hospitals and partners with NICU nurses to develop diapers and wipes that meet the specific needs of pre-term infants. For more information on Huggies No Baby Unhugged program visit the "Why Huggies?" page at Huggies.com.
Yes, Honest Company (and others) get a lot of publicity for their celebrity founders and Kardashian product placement, but generally, we are not impressed (to say the least, I’m being kind). They may be super cute, but parents frequently complain that diapers from the Honest Company and Parasol really don’t contain the elements, so to speak…which is the whole point. (Seriously, they have horror stories. And if you end up having to use twice as many diapers to prevent leakage, how much greener can they really be? Plus, who wants to be changing twice as many diapers?)
Cuties Wipes are made with the same high quality materials as Cuties Diapers — Aloe, Vitamin E and Chamomile. These hypoallergenic wipes are soft on baby’s skin, yet durable enough to clean up tough messes. Cuties Wipes Tri-Form fabric has two soft outer layers and one strong inner layer to prevent the wipe from tearing. Soft pack wipes can be easily opened with a push of the finger to ensure that clean-up is sanitary.
There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]

You’ll also need 2 or 3 changing pad covers (roughly $10 a piece). They get soiled pretty quickly so you’ll need more than one. On top of the changing pad cover, you will also need a whole bunch of waterproof pads (the white pad) as an added layer of protection — these are much easier to wash than the covers, and run $13 for a 3 pack. Get a whole bunch; you’ll be washing them all the time.


Modern cloth diapers come in a host of shapes, including preformed cloth diapers, all-in-one diapers with waterproof exteriors, fitted diaper with covers and pocket or "stuffable" diapers, which consist of a water-resistant outer shell sewn with an opening for insertion of absorbent material inserts.[22] Many design features of modern cloth diapers have followed directly from innovations initially developed in disposable diapers, such as the use of the hour glass shape, materials to separate moisture from skin and the use of double gussets, or an inner elastic band for better fit and containment of waste material.[21] Several cloth diaper brands use variations of Procter & Gamble's original 1973 patent use of a double gusset in Pampers.[13]
DALLAS, Feb. 1, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Huggies, the fastest growing diaper brand in U.S. hospitals, is launching a new diaper for the smallest babies – Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers. These diapers are made explicitly for babies weighing less than two pounds (900 grams), and specially-designed to protect the delicate skin of premature babies, while promoting healthy growth and development. The new diaper is part of No Baby Unhugged, Huggies promise to ensure babies get the hugs they need to thrive. 

An average child will go through several thousand diapers in their life.[45] Since disposable diapers are discarded after a single use, usage of disposable diapers increases the burden on landfill sites, and increased environmental awareness has led to a growth in campaigns for parents to use reusable alternatives such as cloth or hybrid diapers.[46] An estimated 27.4 billion disposable diapers are used each year in the US, resulting in a possible 3.4 million tons of used diapers adding to landfills each year.[47] A discarded disposable diaper takes up to 450 years to decompose.[48]
A baby may need to be changed up to 14 times a day, which makes buying diapers and wipes in bulk a smart and convenient solution. Stock up on baby wipes designed to keep your baby's face, hands and bottom clean and soft. Choose from wipes that feature soothing aloe, are eco-friendly, or fragrance-free for sensitive skin. From preemie to toddler sizes, you can wrap your baby in a diaper that gently hugs their body and offers superb absorbent protection both day and night.
KEEP AWAY FROM ANY SOURCE OF FLAME. PAMPERS DIAPERS, LIKE ALMOST ANY ARTICLE OF CLOTHING, WILL BURN IF EXPOSED TO FLAME. TO AVOID RISK OF CHOKING ON PLASTIC, PADDING, OR OTHER MATERIALS, DO NOT ALLOW YOUR CHILD TO TEAR THE DIAPER, OR HANDLE ANY LOOSE PIECES OF THE DIAPER. DISCARD ANY TORN OR UNSEALED DIAPER, OR ANY LOOSE PIECES OF THE DIAPER. TO AVOID SUFFOCATION, KEEP ALL PLASTIC BAGS AWAY FROM BABIES AND CHILDREN. IF YOU NOTICE GEL-LIKE MATERIAL ON YOUR BABY'S SKIN, DON'T BE ALARMED. THIS COMES FROM THE DIAPER PADDING AND CAN BE EASILY REMOVED BY WIPING YOUR BABY'S SKIN WITH A SOFT, DRY CLOTH.
Other common features of disposable diapers include one or more pairs of either adhesive or mechanical fastening tapes to keep the diaper securely fastened. Some diapers have tapes which are refastenable to allow adjusting of fit or reapplication after inspection. Elasticized fabric single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which has not been absorbed. Some diapers lines now commonly include wetness indicators, in which a chemical included in the fabric of the diaper changes color in the presence of moisture to alert the carer or user that the diaper is wet.[20] A disposable diaper may also include an inner fabric designed to hold moisture against the skin for a brief period before absorption to alert a toilet training or bedwetting user that they have urinated. Most materials in the diaper are held together with the use of a hot-melt adhesive, which is applied in spray form or multi lines, an elastic hot melt is also used to help with pad integrity when the diaper is wet.
Cindy – the formula companies do change their freebie offers from time-to-time. I received a free diaper bag from Enfamil with a cooler pack, 2 free cans of formula, and other baby samples. Similac & Gerber both sent me cans of formula and coupons but not in an actual diaper bag. Some of our visitors have received the free diaper bags at the hospital when they delivered their baby. However, not all hospitals participate.
Amazon ships these to us automatically which I highly recommend. Pampers are our favorite. They are very soft, well made, and can hold a LOT of pee. Our 5 month old can sleep through the night without waking up for a diaper change in these and only these diapers. The don't sag the way some of the others do. Did I mention how soft they are? I have no idea why some diapers out there are made out of the hardest crunchiest paper ever but these feel like they are made out of fabric. LOVE pampers!
Give your baby the best start with a comfortable, absorbent diaper that provides up to 12 hours of protection. Cuties diapers and wipes are made with love to keep your baby’s skin soft and healthy: both have a hypoallergenic extra soft liner with natural botanicals, Vitamin E and aloe.  The diaper features a stretch waistband and nonwoven back sheet that keeps comfort a priority and the liquid resistant inner leg cuff works to prevent any leaks. The wipes use Tri-Form technology for a fabric with two outer layers to protect baby’s skin, and a durable inner layer prevents tears.
Ever since their introduction several decades ago, product innovations include the use of superabsorbent polymers, resealable tapes, and elasticised waist bands. They are now much thinner and much more absorbent. The product range has more recently been extended into children's toilet training phase with the introduction of training pants and pant diapers, which are now undergarments.

Create your Baby Registry online and then stop by the Guest Service desk at any Target store to receive $50 worth of great samples and coupons. Not only is it easy for guests to use this registry, but that’ll put your name on the Target mailing list for great baby saving coupons in the future which you can stack with other coupons to help get Free or Cheap Diapers.
In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]
In 2002, the Vienna city council proposed that horses be made to wear diapers to prevent them from defecating in the street. This caused controversy amongst animal rights groups, who claimed that wearing diapers would be uncomfortable for the animals. The campaigners protested by lining the streets wearing diapers themselves, which spelled out the message "Stop pooh bags".[38] In the Kenyan town of Limuru, donkeys were also diapered at the council's behest.[39] A similar scheme in Blackpool ordered that horses be fitted with rubber and plastic diapers to stop them littering the promenade with dung. The council consulted the RSPCA to ensure that the diapers were not harmful to the horses' welfare.[40][41][42]
Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
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