Did you know Diaper Companies want your used diapers? Yes! And they pay around $100 for 4 hours of your time just to have your babies wet in them. Google (or do a search on Facebook) Diaper Study Market Research {and your city state} and you’ll find several companies to sign up and work with. Her are a couple I found to get you started: Nieto Research Diaper Studies  Focus Pointe Global Marketing Research Company
Huggies believes deeply in the Power of Hugs. That's why every Huggies diaper and wipe is inspired by parents' hugs. For nearly 40 years, Huggies has been helping parents provide love, care and reassurance to help babies thrive. No Baby Unhugged is Huggies promise to ensure babies get the care they need to thrive, including innovative everyday products, growing hospital hugger programs, specially-designed products for the smallest of babies, on-going clinical research and resources, and diaper and wipes donations. Huggies is the fastest growing diaper brand in hospitals and partners with NICU nurses to develop diapers and wipes that meet the specific needs of pre-term infants. For more information on Huggies No Baby Unhugged program visit the "Why Huggies?" page at Huggies.com.

Choosing the best diaper for your baby is an important decision that you may start to make before your baby even arrives! From eco-friendly to special leakage protection, there's a perfect diaper for every size and stage of life. Consider which diaper will offer the best protection based on your baby's size, weight, activity level, and night-time protection.


Diapers have been worn throughout human history. They are made of cloth or synthetic disposable materials. Cloth diapers are composed of layers of fabric such as cotton, hemp, bamboo, microfiber, or even plastic fibers such as PLA, and can be washed and reused multiple times. Disposable diapers contain absorbent chemicals and are thrown away after use. Plastic pants can be worn over diapers to avoid leaks, but with modern cloth diapers, this is no longer necessary.[citation needed]

“At the Diaper Bank of Central Arizona, we collect money, diapers, and wipes from the public and then we partner with around 30 non-profits around the Phoenix metro area whom we give our diapers to. They then go on to hand those diapers out in one of two ways. 1.) Our partners give out emergency supplies of diapers that last usually around 2 days. 2.) Other agencies we work with take on families as part of their normal case management, and they provide diapers for a longer period of time so long as that family is in their program.”

Sometimes when you complete a baby registry you are often given free diapers and other coupons or freebies (like bottles or formula samples). I am not sure which stores offer what exactly, but most will offer you a discount on items left on your registry after your baby’s arrival (and that someone didn’t buy you), often including diapers and wipes! Target Baby Registry offers a free welcome gift for $60 worth of coupons and handpicked samples of their favorite brands. And Amazon Baby Registry‘s Welcome Box is valued at $35 and currently offers a package of baby wipes (among other items). See my full list of 5 Best Baby Registry Stores to see what other sites are offering.
The first disposable diaper was invented in 1946 by Marion Donovan, a professional-turned-housewife who wanted to ensure her children's cloth diapers remained dry while they slept.[16] Donovan patented her design (called 'Boaters') in 1951. She also invented the first paper diapers, but executives did not invest in this idea and it was consequently scrapped for over ten years, until Procter & Gamble used Donovan's design ideas to create Pampers.
This diaper is very economical and does what it needs to do. It doesn't have the wetness indicator but you can feel or smell for yourself if the diaper is wet. Because of its thinness, you can also see clearly when your baby poops. I prefer the diapers with the wetness indicator. This one does what it needs to do; there's nothing fancy about it. If your baby has a sensitive bottom, though, I would recommend using another type of diaper. There's a reason this one is cheaper than the others.

WARINING To avoid risk of choking, do not allow your child to tear the covering. Choking may result from anything children put in their mouths. Discard any torn or unsealed diaper. CAUTION: Like almost any article of clothing, disposable diapers will burn if exposed to flame. Always keep your child away from any source of flame. IMPORTANT: Shake baby soil into toilet. Wrap diaper inside its backsheet before discarding.DO NOT FLUSH DIAPER. PLEASE DO NOT LITTER. Made in the U.S.A. with domestic and imported parts.

If your goal is to get a trash can to conceal the smell, there are three that parents favor: the Baby Trend Diaper Champ ($34, pictured left) is an inexpensive pail that uses regular tall kitchen trash bags (yay!). Simply place the diaper in the opening, then pull the handle so it drops down into the can. So easy and best of all, no squishing a poop-filled mess through a narrow slot, like with the Diaper Genie (yuck!), although I will admit you can still smell poop with this one.


The Atlanta Community Food Bank provides free diapers in partnership with local charities and national businesses such as Pampers and Huggies Every Little Bottom Program assistance. Many of the cloth or disposable diapers distributed are available to low income because the box may have been damaged by the retailer, but the products themselves are in great condition. Some may refer to them as salvaged. Atlanta Georgia (404) 892-3333.
In the hospital, Pampers Swaddlers will (probably) be the first diaper to hit your baby’s bottom. I am very happy with the performance of Pampers; they are soft, fit well, and contain leaks. Pampers Swaddlers are incredibly soft and have an umbilical cord notch for newbies. They also have a line that changes color to indicate wetness (Swaddlers also come in a Sensitive version).

There are resources available to you if you need them, though. Also, don't discount cloth diapers if you have the means to launder them. They're often easier to get at free or reduced cost, not to mention they're way better for the environment, and you can be super smug about that. (Unrelated, but once you're done diapering your baby, those diapers really make the best dusting cloths and glass cleaners.)

The Atlanta Community Food Bank provides free diapers in partnership with local charities and national businesses such as Pampers and Huggies Every Little Bottom Program assistance. Many of the cloth or disposable diapers distributed are available to low income because the box may have been damaged by the retailer, but the products themselves are in great condition. Some may refer to them as salvaged. Atlanta Georgia (404) 892-3333.
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