This diaper is very economical and does what it needs to do. It doesn't have the wetness indicator but you can feel or smell for yourself if the diaper is wet. Because of its thinness, you can also see clearly when your baby poops. I prefer the diapers with the wetness indicator. This one does what it needs to do; there's nothing fancy about it. If your baby has a sensitive bottom, though, I would recommend using another type of diaper. There's a reason this one is cheaper than the others.
Boy or girl — Boys tend to pee more in the front of their diaper, and for girls, pee tends to collect in the middle and back. Boys often have leaky pee pee diapers because their little weenies point in a certain direction and they pee with direction and…force (ever seen a girl write her name in the snow? Didn’t think so). For boys, getting a snug fit around the thighs matters a lot.

We got these diapers because the price was unbeatable with the Amazon Mom subscription. We cloth diaper but use disposables at night and on long outings. These diapers have been great on her little bum and can get her through a six or seven hour stretch no problem. They do smell though- its a baby powder scent that's a bit on the chemical side. We've gotten used to it.


Most children no longer wear diapers when past two to four years of age, depending on culture, diaper type, parental habits, and the child's personality.[28] However, it is becoming increasingly common for children as old as five to still be wearing diapers because of their parents' neglect or the child's opposition to toilet training. This can pose a number of problems if the child is sent to school wearing diapers, including teasing from classmates and health issues resulting from soiled diapers. Teachers' groups—who are attributing the epidemic to an increase in full-time day care use—are requesting that diapered children be banned from the classroom.[citation needed] The disposable diaper industry has been accused of encouraging this trend by manufacturing diapers in increasingly larger sizes. "[S]uper-comfortable diapers" have also been criticized; the advanced technology in modern diapers wick wetness away from skin, leaving the child oblivious to their accident and when they need to go to the toilet. Paediatric nurse June Rogers claims that the attitude of parents plays a major role in the problem, and that toilet training is simply not a priority for many of them.[29][30]
We got these diapers because the price was unbeatable with the Amazon Mom subscription. We cloth diaper but use disposables at night and on long outings. These diapers have been great on her little bum and can get her through a six or seven hour stretch no problem. They do smell though- its a baby powder scent that's a bit on the chemical side. We've gotten used to it.
The eco-factor — The sad truth is that 3.5 million tons of diapers end up in landfills every year. While cloth diapers don’t end up in the landfill, they do require lots of water and power to launder. Some say the carbon footprint of cloth and other eco diapers may not be that much less, in reality. (You can reduce the carbon footprint of cloth diapers by washing them in cold water and hanging them to dry.) What about disposable diapers? We recommend fragrance-free diapers, as toxic chemicals can be lumped in with a “fragrance” so they don’t have to be disclosed on the list of ingredients (due to “trade secret” laws). We also prefer chlorine-free diapers if they’re available to you.
Amazon ships these to us automatically which I highly recommend. Pampers are our favorite. They are very soft, well made, and can hold a LOT of pee. Our 5 month old can sleep through the night without waking up for a diaper change in these and only these diapers. The don't sag the way some of the others do. Did I mention how soft they are? I have no idea why some diapers out there are made out of the hardest crunchiest paper ever but these feel like they are made out of fabric. LOVE pampers!

Cloth diapers are reusable and can be made from natural fibers, synthetic materials, or a combination of both.[21] They are often made from industrial cotton which may be bleached white or left the fiber's natural color. Other natural fiber cloth materials include wool, bamboo, and unbleached hemp. Man-made materials such as an internal absorbent layer of microfiber toweling or an external waterproof layer of polyurethane laminate (PUL) may be used. Polyester fleece and faux suedecloth are often used inside cloth diapers as a "stay-dry" wicking liner because of the non-absorbent properties of those synthetic fibers.


Modern cloth diapers come in a host of shapes, including preformed cloth diapers, all-in-one diapers with waterproof exteriors, fitted diaper with covers and pocket or "stuffable" diapers, which consist of a water-resistant outer shell sewn with an opening for insertion of absorbent material inserts.[22] Many design features of modern cloth diapers have followed directly from innovations initially developed in disposable diapers, such as the use of the hour glass shape, materials to separate moisture from skin and the use of double gussets, or an inner elastic band for better fit and containment of waste material.[21] Several cloth diaper brands use variations of Procter & Gamble's original 1973 patent use of a double gusset in Pampers.[13]
We have two kiddos and have always been loyal to Pampers diapers. We loved their super soft design and their adorable characters that we know and love. Recently that all changed. The diapers are far less soft and are prone to leakage. As soon as they are wet, the diapers smell immediately. We are so disappointed with the new design and changes recently made. Hoping Pampers will consider returning to their old quality standards so we can continue to be loyal customers. ☹️
Otherwise, another great option to save money on diapers is signing up for Amazon Family. You have to become an Amazon Prime Member (which means paying $99/year, however you can Try Amazon Prime with their 30-Day Free Trial first!) but you will get free two-day shipping on millions of items and unlimited music and video streaming along with your awesome diaper savings of 20% off diaper subscriptions! Plus, you can get a 15% Amazon Baby Registry completion discount. The diaper boxes from Amazon are also bigger and will cost less per diaper often than your local stores, plus you won’t have to spend gas to go pick it up!

Diapers are primarily worn by infants, toddlers who are not yet potty trained, and by children who experience bedwetting. They are also used by adults with incontinence, in certain circumstances where access to a toilet is unavailable or for psychological reasons. These can include those of advanced age, patients bed-bound in a hospital, individuals with certain types of physical or mental disability, diaper fetishists, and people working in extreme conditions, such as astronauts. It is not uncommon for people to wear diapers under dry suits.
In October 2008, "An updated lifecycle assessment study for disposable and reusable nappies" by the UK Environment Agency and Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs stated that reusable diapers can cause significantly less (up to 40 per cent) or significantly more damage to the environment than disposable ones, depending mostly on how parents wash and dry them. The "baseline scenario" showed that the difference in green-house emissions was insignificant (in fact, disposables even scored slightly better). However, much better results (emission cuts of up to 40 per cent) could be achieved by using reusable diapers more rationally. "The report shows that, in contrast to the use of disposable nappies, it is consumers' behaviour after purchase that determines most of the impacts from reusable nappies. Cloth nappy users can reduce their environmental impacts by:
Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]
Luvs makes a much cheaper diaper and you get what you pay for. It’s a decent diaper, although not very well made. Coincidentally, Luvs and Pampers are both made by Procter & Gamble, Pampers being the premium brand and Luvs being the economy brand. If you’re on a tight budget, I would instead recommend a chlorine-free store brand, such as Target’s up & up, which runs about 13 cents per diaper.
The environmental impact of cloth as compared to disposable diapers has been studied several times. In one cradle-to-grave study sponsored by the National Association of Diaper Services (NADS) and conducted by Carl Lehrburger and colleagues, results found that disposable diapers produce seven times more solid waste when discarded and three times more waste in the manufacturing process. In addition, effluents from the plastic, pulp, and paper industries are far more hazardous than those from the cotton-growing and -manufacturing processes. Single-use diapers consume less water than reusables laundered at home, but more than those sent to a commercial diaper service. Washing cloth diapers at home uses 50 to 70 gallons (approx. 189 to 264 litres) of water every three days, which is roughly equivalent to flushing the toilet 15 times a day, unless the user has a high-efficiency washing machine. An average diaper service puts its diapers through an average of 13 water changes, but uses less water and energy per diaper than one laundry load at home.[49]

HUGGIES Size Three Snug & Dry Diapers give your baby great protection at a great value. Four layers of protection absorb moisture quickly to help stop leaks for up to 12 hours, and a quilted liner helps to keep your baby dry and comfortable. Plus, Snug & Dry disposable baby diapers have a wetness indicator stripe on the outside that changes from yellow to blue when wet, which helps take the guesswork out of diaper changes. Featuring fun Disney Mickey Mouse designs, Snug & Dry Diapers are available in sizes Newborn (up to 10 lb.), 1 (8-14 lb.), 2 (12-18 lb.), 3 (16-28 lb.), 4 (22-37 lb.), 5 (27+ lb.) and 6 (35+ lb.). Join HUGGIES Rewards to earn points on every pack of HUGGIES diapers and wipes you buy.
WETNES INDICATOR: These both have the wetness indicator line (shown in yellow) which turn blue when the diaper is wet. This is not a necessary diaper function, but can be slightly helpful when doing a quick diaper check. Although, the line tends to almost immediately turn blue once the diaper is applied - but not necessarily enough to change the diaper.

A diaper (American English) or a nappy (Australian English and British English) is a type of underwear that allows the wearer to defecate or urinate without the use of a toilet, by absorbing or containing waste products to prevent soiling of outer clothing or the external environment. When diapers become soiled, they require changing, generally by a second person such as a parent or caregiver. Failure to change a diaper on a sufficiently regular basis can result in skin problems around the area covered by the diaper.


For more than 50 years, parents have trusted Pampers to care for their babies. Pampers is a part of The Procter & Gamble Company (NYSE:PG) and is the #1-selling diaper worldwide. Every day, more than 25 million babies in 100 countries around the world wear Pampers. Pampers offers a complete range of diapers, wipes and training pants designed to provide protection and comfort for every stage of baby’s development. Visit www.pampers.com to learn more about Pampers products, join the Pampers Rewards program, and find ideas and information to help your baby get the most out of love, sleep and play.

Baby companies give out a ton of free baby samples but only if they know you're out there and have a baby. If there's a company that makes a baby product you'd like to try, you should visit their website and register your information with them. This way when the baby companies decide to send out free baby samples, they'll automatically send one out to you.


Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]
Intro: After five years and three kiddos I have used a variety of diapers including Pampers (Swaddles and Baby Dry), Huggies (Little Snugglers and Snug &Dry), Honest, Target, and Luvs. I personally only bought Honest, Target (Up&Up), Babyganics and Luvs a couple times because I didn’t like the feel (Honest diapers and Babyganics are very stiff and papery) and absorption. That being said, I had found that Pampers and Huggies had ‘premium’ (Pampers Swaddlers and Huggies Little Snugglers) and ‘regular’ (Pampers Baby Dry and Huggies Snug & Dry) classes of diapers. I have compared these four different diapers - all in my current purchasing size (Size 5).
Note: The pricing here isn’t static: these are the approximate costs for size 1 diapers bought in bulk (and even those are liable to change frequently online). As you go up in sizing (to size 2, 3, etc.), the price per diaper will increase. And, like anything else, the more you buy, the cheaper diapers are. Thus, buying in bulk saves a fair amount. More on sizing and pricing in a minute….
Ok, these diapers are getting 3 stars because they HAVE held in what they're supposed to hold in. However, I really hate the texture of the diapers. They are "plastic-y". I LOVE the Pampers Swaddlers because they are soft, almost fabric-feeling. I bought a huge box of the Baby Dry kind because they were a few bucks cheaper, and thank God we are almost out of this box because I hate the plastic texture of the diaper. I guess that's just personal preference since they seem to perform just fine, but I prefer to have a soft little baby butt when I hold my little one, not a squishy plastic butt!
I have really enjoyed using Pampers diapers, along with Pampers wipes (which seem to be the only wipes that don’t bother my newborn). The diapers have a yellow line on the, which changes colors when your little one has wet the diaper. I didn’t realize how useful this was until I used honest diapers, which don’t have this feature and it made it difficult to always know if an immediate change was necessary. I have found that the fit of the diaper makes it so a blow out is less likely as well. I have noticed that the diaper can hold a lot of poop and fluid. The only other diaper brands I have used are Kirkland signature and Huggies, both of which were also fine. We will continue to use Pampers diapers because they have a high quality product and particularly the Pampers wipes, which we really like. We received some free diapers in exchange for this review, however, we had already been using the Pampers products and will continue to.

I was always a Pampers user with my first kid 4 years ago and just had my second. I was given Pampers again at the hospital when he was born and loved them again from the start. I love the wetness indicator so I know when to change him, they hold everything in well, and fit great. I'll keep relying only on Pampers for this baby like I did for my first!
Yes, Honest Company (and others) get a lot of publicity for their celebrity founders and Kardashian product placement, but generally, we are not impressed (to say the least, I’m being kind). They may be super cute, but parents frequently complain that diapers from the Honest Company and Parasol really don’t contain the elements, so to speak…which is the whole point. (Seriously, they have horror stories. And if you end up having to use twice as many diapers to prevent leakage, how much greener can they really be? Plus, who wants to be changing twice as many diapers?)
Sometimes, a written letter or email telling a diaper company about your baby’s birth (especially if you have multiples) asking for a product to sample can result in some free diapers. I wouldn’t really recommend going the “sob story” route too strong, but companies want to know you, their customer. If you ever have faulty diapers, be sure to contact them as most have a guarantee and will replace your defective diapers for free.
We have tried almost all other brands including, Target, Luvs and Huggies. Although usually more expensive, Pampers by far have done a better job with diaper rash. We change diapers probably more than usual (approx.) 12-15/day. That said, the other than Pampers diapers left red rashes on bottom. Some of the rashes looked like open wounds. On a hunch, I believed it was from the specific diapers. Sure enough, the Pampers and the mesh lining did away with the rash. I did apply cream to alleviate rash but I usually don't have to use if baby is in Pampers swaddlers. It's true that you get what you pay ft
In addition to the other two baby Registries, Babies R Us will PAY YOU 10% in reward dollars for anything purchased on your registry! WHAT?! Yes, that means you can use the money (via a gift card) to buy more items (aka get Diapers for FREE!), and remember, Babies R Us (or Toys R Us) take coupons. And, you can also use a manufacturer coupon on those diapers to get even more for your money!
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