Many of these groups work with companies such as Huggies and their Every Little Bottom program. They may also have partnerships in place with Pampers and other diaper manufacturers so that samples can be given out to parents that request them. These are just a few of the non-profits and charities that distribute free diapers, but each state will also have clothing closets that can be contacted.


Target – Did you know you can get this awesome gift bag filled with free baby stuff when you create a Target Baby Registry? The picture above shows what I got; free diaper samples, wipes, bottles, pacifiers, coupons, plus much more. To see a detailed list of what came in my Target gift bag, click here. To get your free gift, just create a baby registry online. You’ll get an email from Target explaining how to pick up your gift bag at a Target store. This is a limited supply offer, so make sure to get yours today! 🙂
Kimberly-Clark (NYSE: KMB) and its well-known global brands are an indispensable part of life for people in more than 175 countries. Every day, nearly a quarter of the world's population trust Kimberly-Clark brands and the solutions they provide to enhance their health, hygiene and well-being. With brands such as Kleenex, Scott, Huggies, Pull-Ups, Kotex and Depend, Kimberly-Clark holds the No.1 or No. 2 share position in 80 countries. To keep up with the latest news and to learn more about the company's 145-year history of innovation, visit www.kimberly-clark.com or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
First Coast Women's Services. The mailing address is 11215 San Jose Boulevard, Jacksonville, Florida 32223. The non-profit supports lower income women in Duval County. Diapers, referrals, and other aid is provided to those that qualify. Call (904) 262-6300, or try another non-profit known as Emergency Pregnancy Services at (904) 308-7510. More diaper programs in Duval County.
BEWARE!!! Just because the box looks like Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max Diapers, these are NOT the same. My son is now 5 mo. old and we've been using Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max diapers since he was born (you know, with the blue wetness indicator on the front). However, these are NOT Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max. These are thinner, do not have the woven material inside the diaper and are not nearly as absorbent as the Swaddlers. My son has leaked out of his diaper the last 5 nights... these diapers simply are not absorbent enough to contain a night's worth of pee. We rarely had this problem with Dry Max. I won't be buying these again- they simply aren't worth the very little cost savings.

As parents ourselves, we never want your little one uncomfortable. While irritation can occur for a variety of reasons, we'd like to learn more and see how we can help. When you have a moment, please connect with us online at http://bit.ly/2IumGnR or by phone at 1-877-648-2484 anytime Monday-Friday, 7:30AM-7PM CT. One of our specialists will be happy to help since we expect nothing but the best from our products and want the same for you and your baby. We look forward to hearing back from you!

A diaper (American English) or a nappy (Australian English and British English) is a type of underwear that allows the wearer to defecate or urinate without the use of a toilet, by absorbing or containing waste products to prevent soiling of outer clothing or the external environment. When diapers become soiled, they require changing, generally by a second person such as a parent or caregiver. Failure to change a diaper on a sufficiently regular basis can result in skin problems around the area covered by the diaper.


In October 2008, "An updated lifecycle assessment study for disposable and reusable nappies" by the UK Environment Agency and Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs stated that reusable diapers can cause significantly less (up to 40 per cent) or significantly more damage to the environment than disposable ones, depending mostly on how parents wash and dry them. The "baseline scenario" showed that the difference in green-house emissions was insignificant (in fact, disposables even scored slightly better). However, much better results (emission cuts of up to 40 per cent) could be achieved by using reusable diapers more rationally. "The report shows that, in contrast to the use of disposable nappies, it is consumers' behaviour after purchase that determines most of the impacts from reusable nappies. Cloth nappy users can reduce their environmental impacts by:
The early 1990s also saw the introduction of gender-specific diapers in the Pampers brand; the product returned to unisex diapers towards the end of the decade. In 1993, Pampers introduced training pants, but the Pampers Trainers were a short lived product. Pampers did not sell training pants again until the introduction of Easy Up.[3] In 1996, P&G acquired Baby Fresh wipes from Kimberly-Clark; Kimberly-Clark had recently acquired Baby Fresh owner Scott Paper Company and was ordered to sell the wipes business.[4] In 1998, Procter & Gamble introduced its largest diaper at the time, Pampers Baby-Dry Size 6. It was promoted in an advertising campaign featuring pediatrician and child development expert Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, who said to let the child decide when the time is right to potty train. The size 6 diapers were billed for growing toddlers. Huggies also introduced a size 6 diaper at this time.[5]
The early 1990s also saw the introduction of gender-specific diapers in the Pampers brand; the product returned to unisex diapers towards the end of the decade. In 1993, Pampers introduced training pants, but the Pampers Trainers were a short lived product. Pampers did not sell training pants again until the introduction of Easy Up.[3] In 1996, P&G acquired Baby Fresh wipes from Kimberly-Clark; Kimberly-Clark had recently acquired Baby Fresh owner Scott Paper Company and was ordered to sell the wipes business.[4] In 1998, Procter & Gamble introduced its largest diaper at the time, Pampers Baby-Dry Size 6. It was promoted in an advertising campaign featuring pediatrician and child development expert Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, who said to let the child decide when the time is right to potty train. The size 6 diapers were billed for growing toddlers. Huggies also introduced a size 6 diaper at this time.[5]
Wrap your baby in Pampers Swaddlers diapers, our most trusted comfort and protection and the #1 choice of US hospitals.* Our Blankie Soft™ diaper with a unique Absorb Away Liner™ pulls wetness and mess away from baby's skin to help keep your baby comfortable. It also has a color-changing wetness indicator that tells you when your baby might need a change. And we make sure your baby's delicate belly is protected with the contoured umbilical notch.**
Nice old, soft bits of good Turkish towelling, properly washed, will make the softest of diaper coverings, inside which specially absorbent napkins (diapers), see below at 1A, soft, light, and easily washed, are contained. These should rarely be soiled once regular habits have been inculcated, especially during the night period in which it is most important to prevent habit formation
This diaper is very economical and does what it needs to do. It doesn't have the wetness indicator but you can feel or smell for yourself if the diaper is wet. Because of its thinness, you can also see clearly when your baby poops. I prefer the diapers with the wetness indicator. This one does what it needs to do; there's nothing fancy about it. If your baby has a sensitive bottom, though, I would recommend using another type of diaper. There's a reason this one is cheaper than the others.

Choosing the best diaper for your baby is an important decision that you may start to make before your baby even arrives! From eco-friendly to special leakage protection, there's a perfect diaper for every size and stage of life. Consider which diaper will offer the best protection based on your baby's size, weight, activity level, and night-time protection.

During the 1950s, companies such as Johnson and Johnson, Kendall, Parke-Davis, Playtex, and Molnlycke entered the disposable diaper market, and in 1956, Procter & Gamble began researching disposable diapers. Victor Mills, along with his project group including William Dehaas (both men who worked for the company) invented what would be trademarked "Pampers". Although Pampers were conceptualized in 1959, the diapers themselves were not launched into the market until 1961.[11] Pampers now accounts for more than $10 billion in annual revenue at Procter & Gamble.[12]
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