The Honest Co. – I requested a FREE Diaper Bundle from The Honest Company and chose the sizes and prints I wanted. There are lots of cute prints for both boys and girls! They sent me 7 free diaper samples and a package of wipes in my bundle (see photo above). The Honest Co also offers a FREE Essentials Bundle which contains baby and household products. Both trial bundles are FREE, you just pay a flat $5.95 shipping fee. This is a fantastic deal, since the Diapers Bundle sells for $79.95 and the Essentials bundle is $39.95! I personally think paying just $5.95 for them to ship it straight to your door makes it a no-brainer. TIP: To save on shipping, you can add BOTH the FREE Diapers Bundle and the Essentials bundle to the same order and you’ll still pay only $5.95 total. 🙂
In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]
But honestly, cloth diapers, as I mentioned earlier, have the most robust free diaper programs and they're the easiest to access. Groups like Giving Diapers, Giving Hope and The Rebecca Foundation's Cloth Diaper Closet offer free cloth diapers to those in need. Alternatively, you can get free or very cheap cloth diapers from online forums like Diaper Swappers that specialize in recycled (highly laundered) cloth diapers. Change-Diapers.com is a great resource with a link every Friday for cloth diaper giveaways they've found online, too.
Our new and best-ever diaper has arrived! These super-absorbent, eco-friendly* diapers are made with naturally derived and sustainable materials* and they’re gentle for your baby’s delicate skin. Now featuring an improved fit and advanced leak protection like never before, this super-soft diaper is designed to perform. Oh, and did we mention how adorable they are?
We don't take those years of loyalty lightly, Courtney, and very much appreciate your opinion on our newest updates. Please know that we haven't made any material changes to our Swaddlers at all, so they should still be the same great quality you've always loved. Our number is (800)726-7377, we want to make this right and keep you in our Pampers family.
BEWARE!!! Just because the box looks like Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max Diapers, these are NOT the same. My son is now 5 mo. old and we've been using Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max diapers since he was born (you know, with the blue wetness indicator on the front). However, these are NOT Pampers Swaddlers Dry Max. These are thinner, do not have the woven material inside the diaper and are not nearly as absorbent as the Swaddlers. My son has leaked out of his diaper the last 5 nights... these diapers simply are not absorbent enough to contain a night's worth of pee. We rarely had this problem with Dry Max. I won't be buying these again- they simply aren't worth the very little cost savings.
Intro: After five years and three kiddos I have used a variety of diapers including Pampers (Swaddles and Baby Dry), Huggies (Little Snugglers and Snug &Dry), Honest, Target, and Luvs. I personally only bought Honest, Target (Up&Up), Babyganics and Luvs a couple times because I didn’t like the feel (Honest diapers and Babyganics are very stiff and papery) and absorption. That being said, I had found that Pampers and Huggies had ‘premium’ (Pampers Swaddlers and Huggies Little Snugglers) and ‘regular’ (Pampers Baby Dry and Huggies Snug & Dry) classes of diapers. I have compared these four different diapers - all in my current purchasing size (Size 5).
Keeping your little ones clean and comfortable while wearing a baby diaper can be simple. Choose the size to fit your baby, whether you need preemie or newborn diapers or your child is near 40 pounds. Some disposable diapers are made differently to meet your needs at various developmental stages. For example, certain larger sizes from Pampers and Huggies can move to meet the active demands of a toddler.

You’ll also need 2 or 3 changing pad covers (roughly $10 a piece). They get soiled pretty quickly so you’ll need more than one. On top of the changing pad cover, you will also need a whole bunch of waterproof pads (the white pad) as an added layer of protection — these are much easier to wash than the covers, and run $13 for a 3 pack. Get a whole bunch; you’ll be washing them all the time.


In the first couple of months, you may find yourself changing diapers up to 10 times in 24 hours. Diapers should be changed whenever they are wet or soiled. Your baby will often (but not always) let you know. With a super-absorbent diaper like Pampers diapers, you can tell if it's wet by feeling for lumps in the absorbent material. Here are some common times for changing diapers:

We have tried almost all other brands including, Target, Luvs and Huggies. Although usually more expensive, Pampers by far have done a better job with diaper rash. We change diapers probably more than usual (approx.) 12-15/day. That said, the other than Pampers diapers left red rashes on bottom. Some of the rashes looked like open wounds. On a hunch, I believed it was from the specific diapers. Sure enough, the Pampers and the mesh lining did away with the rash. I did apply cream to alleviate rash but I usually don't have to use if baby is in Pampers swaddlers. It's true that you get what you pay ft
When you buy Huggies Diapers (and remember, you can use coupons when you do), you will find little stickers inside the box/bag that have a code to enter for the Huggies Rewards Program. Essentially you enter those into your Huggies Account and when you acquire 500 points, you can get a FREE Jumbo pack. I made a diaper cake and had 10 codes lickety split… so those bad boys add up FAST.
An average child will go through several thousand diapers in their life.[45] Since disposable diapers are discarded after a single use, usage of disposable diapers increases the burden on landfill sites, and increased environmental awareness has led to a growth in campaigns for parents to use reusable alternatives such as cloth or hybrid diapers.[46] An estimated 27.4 billion disposable diapers are used each year in the US, resulting in a possible 3.4 million tons of used diapers adding to landfills each year.[47] A discarded disposable diaper takes up to 450 years to decompose.[48]

There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
[Aside: Look, every time I throw a diaper in the trash can, I feel bad, okay? I am otherwise a very good citizen of the earth: I recycle and compost, I take mass transit every day instead of driving, I [used to] make baby food instead of buying it in the jar… but when it came to scooping poop from a diaper into the toilet, then washing a bunch of poop-stained diapers in the washing machine (for which I had to use COINS because we rented an apartment in the City), my head started to explode. I’m sorry, Mother Earth. I hope you’ll find it in your earthy heart to forgive me. I still love you.]
In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]
Destiny Diaper Bank covers the entire southwest Florida area. The non-profit almost 700,000 diapers a year to the low income and needy. They may also provide free samples or coupons to buy them. They have five sites throughout southwest Florida that they distribute diapers from, and also partner with local social service agencies. The group is run by volunteers. Cape Coral, Florida. Call (239)-549-2130.
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