There are several different organizations around the country that distribute free diapers to needy and low income families. Many of these are charities or churches, with some government programs also assisting. There are programs for single mothers, teenage moms, and families living in poverty. Anyone that needs free or low cost diapers near where they live, and that meets qualifications, may apply.
DALLAS, Feb. 1, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Huggies, the fastest growing diaper brand in U.S. hospitals, is launching a new diaper for the smallest babies – Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers. These diapers are made explicitly for babies weighing less than two pounds (900 grams), and specially-designed to protect the delicate skin of premature babies, while promoting healthy growth and development. The new diaper is part of No Baby Unhugged, Huggies promise to ensure babies get the hugs they need to thrive. 
The process to create Huggies Little Snugglers Nano Preemie Diapers included intensive research and design optimization, as well as interviews with nurses and neonatal therapists to ensure the design provided optimal fit for healthy growth and development. The diaper features gentle, specially-sized fasteners and a narrow, absorbent pad to provide a flexible fit so that baby can be comfortably positioned in a fetal tuck, with arms and legs close to the body. The soft, smooth liner and gentle leg gathers offer leakage protection without irritating fragile, underdeveloped skin.
If you’re spending that much, and you’re in the market for something with a few more bells and whistles, I also like the Hatch Baby Grow ($129), an integrated baby scale and changing pad in one. The scale allows you to track weight gain, milk intake and other such things that are typically only ascertained by a visit to a pediatrician’s office. I would especially recommend this for parents who are the “need to know” type (those who like to have lots of data) or if you have any reason to expect a preemie (you are pregnant with multiples, high risk, etc.).

When you have a kid (or kids) in diapers, it can be absurd how fast those boxes get emptied. Many may be wondering if you can use food stamps to buy diapers, but unfortunately Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits can only be used to buy food items, according to the United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services.
Free diapers may be available for low-income families with young children, household with elderly and disabled, and other struggling individuals from the Diaper Bank of Northern Indiana. They partner with local social service agencies and companies like Huggies and their Every Little Bottom Program, and diapers are distributed through many of the local non-profit agencies across Indiana. South Bend Indiana. info@diaperbankni.org
*Ad dates and offers vary by market. mPerks offers good with mPerks digital coupon(s). See coupon(s) for terms. Buy one, get one (BOGO) promotional items must be of equal or lesser value. Special pricing and offers are good only while supplies last. No rainchecks or substitutions unless otherwise stated. Buy/save offers must be purchased in a single transaction; no cash back. Other conditions and/or exclusions may apply. Meijer.com reserves the right to limit quantities (including after you've submitted your order).
There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
Keeping your little ones clean and comfortable while wearing a baby diaper can be simple. Choose the size to fit your baby, whether you need preemie or newborn diapers or your child is near 40 pounds. Some disposable diapers are made differently to meet your needs at various developmental stages. For example, certain larger sizes from Pampers and Huggies can move to meet the active demands of a toddler.
The environmental impact of cloth as compared to disposable diapers has been studied several times. In one cradle-to-grave study sponsored by the National Association of Diaper Services (NADS) and conducted by Carl Lehrburger and colleagues, results found that disposable diapers produce seven times more solid waste when discarded and three times more waste in the manufacturing process. In addition, effluents from the plastic, pulp, and paper industries are far more hazardous than those from the cotton-growing and -manufacturing processes. Single-use diapers consume less water than reusables laundered at home, but more than those sent to a commercial diaper service. Washing cloth diapers at home uses 50 to 70 gallons (approx. 189 to 264 litres) of water every three days, which is roughly equivalent to flushing the toilet 15 times a day, unless the user has a high-efficiency washing machine. An average diaper service puts its diapers through an average of 13 water changes, but uses less water and energy per diaper than one laundry load at home.[49]
Baby diapers come in packages that contain anywhere from 12 to 160 diapers. This way, you can start by trying out smaller packages of different kinds and then stock up once you find your favorite. If you prefer cloth diapers, we carry different colors and sizes from brand gDiapers that are machine washable. You'll also find eco friendly diapers that are chlorine-free and sometimes plastic-free.
In March 2010, Pampers announced a change to their popular Cruisers and Swaddlers diapers with the addition of the new Dry-Max technology. Many parents reported[22] rashes and chemical burns as a result of using the new diapers. Procter & Gamble claim that pediatric experts have reviewed the Pampers with DryMax safety data and have seen no correlation between the reported rash and diaper.[23] In May 2010, a lawsuit was filed against Procter & Gamble based on the injuries allegedly caused by the diapers.[24] In September 2010, the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission issued the results of its investigation into the matter, finding no evidence that these diapers cause diaper rash.[25]
To help support new and expecting moms, Target is giving away a free Welcome Kit when you set up a baby registry.  The kit includes $50+ worth of coupons and free diapers. After creating your registry, visit the Target service desk to pick up your free Welcome Kit. Items may vary by stores, but may include: Munchkin bottle, Lansinoh samples, MAM Newborn pacifier, Honest Wipes, and Diapers sample pack, Baby Bag and much more!
Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]
Usually I don't like store brand diapers I've been accustomed to buying huggies, pampers, or sometimes luvs. On occasion when there's sales or I'm on the go and on my last diaper I've tried a few store brands that were horrible quality. Thanks to this sample I now know that walgreens well beginnings diapers are awesome, I will definitely keep purchasing these!
When you have a kid (or kids) in diapers, it can be absurd how fast those boxes get emptied. Many may be wondering if you can use food stamps to buy diapers, but unfortunately Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits can only be used to buy food items, according to the United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services.
Sometimes when you complete a baby registry you are often given free diapers and other coupons or freebies (like bottles or formula samples). I am not sure which stores offer what exactly, but most will offer you a discount on items left on your registry after your baby’s arrival (and that someone didn’t buy you), often including diapers and wipes! Target Baby Registry offers a free welcome gift for $60 worth of coupons and handpicked samples of their favorite brands. And Amazon Baby Registry‘s Welcome Box is valued at $35 and currently offers a package of baby wipes (among other items). See my full list of 5 Best Baby Registry Stores to see what other sites are offering.
Luvs makes a much cheaper diaper and you get what you pay for. It’s a decent diaper, although not very well made. Coincidentally, Luvs and Pampers are both made by Procter & Gamble, Pampers being the premium brand and Luvs being the economy brand. If you’re on a tight budget, I would instead recommend a chlorine-free store brand, such as Target’s up & up, which runs about 13 cents per diaper.
Cloth diapers are reusable and can be made from natural fibers, synthetic materials, or a combination of both.[21] They are often made from industrial cotton which may be bleached white or left the fiber's natural color. Other natural fiber cloth materials include wool, bamboo, and unbleached hemp. Man-made materials such as an internal absorbent layer of microfiber toweling or an external waterproof layer of polyurethane laminate (PUL) may be used. Polyester fleece and faux suedecloth are often used inside cloth diapers as a "stay-dry" wicking liner because of the non-absorbent properties of those synthetic fibers.

Most hospitals will give you a free diaper bag when you deliver your baby. Call your local hospital before your due date to see if they participate. Some hospitals require that you print out a certificate and bring it with you to get your free diaper bag. Your OB/Gyn and Pediatrician are also great resources to get free baby stuff like free diapers, free baby bottles, baby formula samples, etc. Many times they’ll have plenty of baby samples on hand – just ask!
Give your baby the best start with a comfortable, absorbent diaper that provides up to 12 hours of protection. Cuties diapers and wipes are made with love to keep your baby’s skin soft and healthy: both have a hypoallergenic extra soft liner with natural botanicals, Vitamin E and aloe.  The diaper features a stretch waistband and nonwoven back sheet that keeps comfort a priority and the liquid resistant inner leg cuff works to prevent any leaks. The wipes use Tri-Form technology for a fabric with two outer layers to protect baby’s skin, and a durable inner layer prevents tears.

Seventh Generation – Get a free trial of Seventh Generation diapers and wipes from Grove Collaborative. The trial kit includes a full-size pack of diapers (36 count) and a pack of travel wipes (30 count). It’s a $16.98 value! The kit is free, you just pay $4.99 shipping. Plus, they have a refer-a-friend program. Send a friend $10 and you’ll get a $10 credit too. Win-win!
[Aside: Look, every time I throw a diaper in the trash can, I feel bad, okay? I am otherwise a very good citizen of the earth: I recycle and compost, I take mass transit every day instead of driving, I [used to] make baby food instead of buying it in the jar… but when it came to scooping poop from a diaper into the toilet, then washing a bunch of poop-stained diapers in the washing machine (for which I had to use COINS because we rented an apartment in the City), my head started to explode. I’m sorry, Mother Earth. I hope you’ll find it in your earthy heart to forgive me. I still love you.]

Keeping your little ones clean and comfortable while wearing a baby diaper can be simple. Choose the size to fit your baby, whether you need preemie or newborn diapers or your child is near 40 pounds. Some disposable diapers are made differently to meet your needs at various developmental stages. For example, certain larger sizes from Pampers and Huggies can move to meet the active demands of a toddler.
In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]
DO NOT BUY THESE! These are not the same Huggies I've used for years. We went up a size and these ones are paper thin, cut oddly and there are hard clumps of dried powder of some sort and they don't bend. I'm attaching a photo to the clump. They are in different parts of each diaper. These seem like knock off Huggies. And Amazon will NOT let me return them. I'm sending a letter to Huggies.
Cloth diapers are reusable and can be made from natural fibers, synthetic materials, or a combination of both.[21] They are often made from industrial cotton which may be bleached white or left the fiber's natural color. Other natural fiber cloth materials include wool, bamboo, and unbleached hemp. Man-made materials such as an internal absorbent layer of microfiber toweling or an external waterproof layer of polyurethane laminate (PUL) may be used. Polyester fleece and faux suedecloth are often used inside cloth diapers as a "stay-dry" wicking liner because of the non-absorbent properties of those synthetic fibers.

Things of My Very Own, Inc.-Crisis Intervention Center, 202 Front Street, Schenectady New York 12305, 518-630-5146. The capital region and down state are covered. So if you live in Albany or New York City you can call for information on diaper assistance programs. Thousands of working poor families with young babies get the free diapers they need from this NYC non-profit.

×